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Über dieses Buch

Make an app from start to finish on your own or with a dedicated team. This book is your all-in-one, go-to resource for designing, building, and marketing, a trending app that others flock to buy. Use detailed analysis to decide what designs you should choose and whether you should learn to code or hire someone else to do the trench work for you.

If you plan carefully and make intelligent decisions when establishing your viral app business, you will find success on the App Store. Remember, though, the App Store is not a lottery. Apps are not randomly featured, and it is not happenstance that makes your app successful.

Luck and fortuitous timing tempered by hard work and a good app idea are key factors to success. You can't aimlessly create an app, throw it on the App Store, and watch the dollars roll in. You’ll get back what you put in. This book lays the foundation and outlines the skills needed by aspiring entrepreneurs with no coding experience for selling a killer app.

What You'll LearnDesign apps that are impressive, wow users, and most importantly, are easy to use.

Build a business model around an app that turns a profit

Determine when its OK to build your own app or when it's better to hire a third party to do so.

Who This Book Is For

Small business owners who want to create an app, but have no programming experience

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Design

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Refining Your Idea

Abstract
A great idea with poor execution is a poor app, but a poor idea with excellent execution is a great app. This means that it matters far less what your app idea is, and far more that it's a well made app.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 2. Website

Abstract
One of the first things you're going to need is a website for your app—you need this before you've even made your app. Websites are free and easy to make. All you need is an app idea. It is not nearly as difficult as making an app.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 3. Idea Validation

Abstract
You need to make sure people will buy your app before building it, because you liking an idea doesn't mean lots of people will like an idea. Even if a few others have told you the idea is brilliant, that doesn't mean it will actually sell well.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 4. Business Models

Abstract
Once you’ve ironed out what your app is actually going to be, you need to decide how you're going to make money off of it. In other words, you need to decide how your app company is going to work. This is the essence of creating a business model.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 5. Fair Pricing

Abstract
After you've decided on a business model, you need to determine how you'll make money. Picking a good pricing model for your app is difficult. The App Store is a highly volatile market, and the best pricing model can change as quickly as the App Store itself. Additionally, price wars have driven the median price of an app down to $0.99, so it can be hard to justify an app that’s more expensive than that.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 6. Planning Your App

Abstract
Hopefully the last section in this book gave you a solid idea of what you want your app to be. Not only do you have a core mission for your app that is aligned with what users want, you have identified the problems they experience in their lives.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 7. User Experience Design

Abstract
The designing you're doing now and have been doing up until now is known as User Experience Design. It's a huge and growing field in software design, and it is why Apple's apps all work so smoothly. It's what you're going to learn to do so that you, too, can have a really great iOS app. So that you can talk fluently about what you're learning to do with other people, here's a bunch of basic jargon that is going to be used from here on out:
Megan Holstein

Chapter 8. Case Study: Scribe

Abstract
Scribe is an app that solved one very small but very serious problem for some people—copying and pasting between their Macs and iOS devices.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 9. Design Personality

Abstract
Graphic design is the part of app design everyone is familiar with—the area in which the pixels, colors, animation, and visuals of the app appear. This is where your wireframes become mockups. Before you start on your graphic design, you need to have in mind what you want your graphic design to be like.
Megan Holstein

Development

Frontmatter

Chapter 10. Funding Sources

Abstract
So you've got a plan for an app, and you’ve determined a way to bring that app into reality. Now it's time to tally up the costs. Let’s go over possible costs briefly so you can get an idea of what you're up against.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 11. Case Study: Applits

Abstract
Applits is a company that relies on crowd-sourcing to bring its app ideas to market. The Applits platform takes a unique approach to the industry, running as a monthly competition where site members submit their app ideas and vote on their favorites, and the most popular ones are developed by Applits. Submitters of the winning app idea receive 15% of the profits the app makes once on the market.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 12. Development Methods

Abstract
You have your idea all fleshed out, and you're ready to get your app made. However, there are a couple of options available as to how you can get your app made. Each has its pros and cons, and each costs varying amounts of money.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 13. Hiring Developers

Abstract
If you've decided to contract out your development work, you need to know how to avoid common mistakes and pitfalls when working with a contractor, whether that’s locally or online.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 14. Code Add-Ons

Abstract
There are sets of code you can get for free and add to your app directly, which can save your developer time and you money when it comes to adding key features to your app. You want to know about these before you begin the development process, so that you can consciously include them in your app.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 15. Beta-Testing

Abstract
Beta-testing is a critical stage of app development that a lot of indie developers don't spend enough time on. Many indies build their app and they test it within their personal network and perhaps get their friends to test the app, but don't test the app with target users.
Megan Holstein

Deployment

Frontmatter

Chapter 16. Pre-Launch Marketing

Abstract
Before you get started marketing your app, you have to do to first things first. This means making a plan and getting all your ducks in a row before launching your marketing plan.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 17. App Store Listing

Abstract
The most important marketing for any app is listing the app in the App Store. Every listing is formatted by Apple automatically, so the only thing that differentiates your app is the content you put on it. This is the thing everyone in the world sees before downloading your app.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 18. Mailing List

Abstract
I would be remiss to leave out the importance of your email list when discussing marketing techniques. Your email list is an asset we're going to be using repeatedly throughout the rest of the marketing section, so you need to make a good one now.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 19. Social Media

Abstract
You don't need this book to know you should have social media. Effectively using social media is another obvious step in the path to making your own app. The challenging part of social media is not making the accounts, but actually coming up with good content that gets you more downloads, more press, and more success.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 20. Online Community

Abstract
The reason you are constructing customer support, a mailing list, social media, and a website is to cultivate an online community. An online community is a large group or groups of users who talk about your app, suggest features, and helpfully guide development. An organized community is an invaluable resource in making users happy.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 21. Case Study: Everest

Abstract
Everest is an app that helps users achieve their dreams by breaking them into small steps that they share with other users. Users can follow one another and let them know when they have inspired them. It has all the traditional sharing vehicles, such as sharing photos, texting, and having conversations. In addition to tracking your progress, you can share captured moments with your followers.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 22. App Video

Abstract
Online videos are one of the most popular search options in the world, and you want your app in those listings. Many people check out YouTube or Vimeo videos of apps before buying, and yet others randomly peruse videos for hours on end of things that interest them. Video is an immersive and engaging medium, and you want a video in front of these engaged users.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 23. The Press

Abstract
Everybody wonders what the big secret is to getting picked up by a major news outlet. The problem is that the big secret is to be famous. So how do you generate buzz if you're not already famous?
Megan Holstein

Chapter 24. Advertising Space

Abstract
Should you invest in ads for your app startup? If the answer were a clear and concise "no," you wouldn't ever see an app advertised, but you do. But the answer is not a simple "yes," either.
Megan Holstein

Chapter 25. Discounts and Promotions

Abstract
Once your app is out, you can periodically run standard discount campaigns and promotions to boost sales of your app. These are quick and easy things you can do periodically to keep sales up and your app relevant.
Megan Holstein

Backmatter

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