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Über dieses Buch

From the reviews: Computer Communications "Although the concept of ISDN has been with us now for over a decade, and much development work has been carried out du- ring this period, there are very few comprehensive books available on the subject. This is perhaps one of the best of them.The book aims to provide engineers and potential engi- neers with an overview of the requirements and features of ISDN that will be useful in thedesign, construction and operation of such systems. The author and his six collabora- tors have succeeded in this respect, producing a readable, yet thorough, technical book that can be recommended to a wider audience... Throughout the book the explanations are enhanced byclear, well-presented, relevant diagrams, and there is a very use- ful annex on the full set of standards relating to ISDN. This is a good book that will definitely be used as a refe- rence over the next few years by many engineers working in the area..." IEEE Computer "ISDN is a slimbut very effective book dealing with almost every aspect of the evolution ofpublic communications net- works...I highly recommend this book to engineerswho are new either to the field of ISDN or to specific ISDN topics. It is clear, concise, and is excellent padding for those tackling the CCITT recommendations."

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

1. The Function of Telecommunications

Abstract
Communication means the exchange of information. The function of telecommunications is to facilitate communication for people.
Peter Bocker

2. Telecommunication Services

Abstract
The communication facilities in a network are made available to the user in the form of defined telecommunication services. In the ISDN, the 64-kbit/s B-channel (basic channel), the H-channels with bit rates of 384 kbit/s or more and the 16 kbit/s or 64 kbit/s D-channel (signaling channel) (see Sect. 4.2.1.1) enable powerful new services and supplementary services to be provided. For reasons of continuity the ISDN also includes the existing services of the present-day telephone network. Furthermore, existing terminals from the telephone network and public dedicated data networks for circuit-switched or packet-switched data transmission (CSPDN, PSPDN) can also be operated on an ISDN line. This means that the user can enjoy the advantages of integrated services without having to replace all his existing terminal equipment.
Peter Bocker

3. ISDN Structure

Abstract
Communication networks essentially comprise three components (Fig. 3.1): the subscriber line network, the exchanges and the trunk network.
Peter Bocker

4. Subscriber Access

Abstract
Compared with the digital telephone network in which analog signals are transmitted to the user equipment, the essential technical innovation of ISDN is the digitization of the subscriber line (see Fig. 3.4). The majority of the internationally agreed ISDN specifications (see list of CCITT Recommendations of the I Series in the Annex to this book) on which the following remarks are based therefore deal with subscriber access.
Peter Bocker

5. ISDN Terminals

Abstract
The services of a communication network are accessed via the terminal equipments connected to the user-network interfaces (see Sect. 4.2). The term terminal equipment covers terminals for interpersonal communication (e.g. the telephone), terminals for communication between user and data processing systems, and also data processing systems themselves. As the integration of services does not give rise to any special considerations for data processing systems, this chapter therefore deals solely with terminals enabling the human user to gain access to ISDN services.
Peter Bocker

6. Switching in the ISDN

Abstract
The cost-effective realization in LSI chips of digital time-division multiplexing and speech digitization (64 kbit/s pulse code modulation-PCM-in accordance with CCITT Rec. G.711 [6.1]) has resulted in a new concept for switching equipment.
Peter Bocker

7. Transmission Methods in the ISDN

Abstract
According to its CCITT definition [7.1], the ISDN is based on the digitized telephone network. It can therefore use the same digital transmission systems as the telephone network on the interexchange (trunk) circuits. However, in order to use the subscriber lines for ISDN basic accesses at 144 kbit/s (cf. Sect. 4.2.1.2), new transmission methods must be employed, although existing cables can be retained. Moreover, for the B-ISDN access, an optical fiber has to be provided.
Peter Bocker

8. ISDN — The User’s View

Abstract
The evaluation of the ISDN from the user—s point of view is intended to show the ways in which the ISDN improves communication in terms of meeting user needs and supporting new applications. It also considers those requirements that will for some time have to remain unsatisfied. In general, it should be emphasized that the ISDN improves communication through simpler operation, improved accessibility as well as easier and faster access to information. These improvements ultimately result in a better communications cost/ performance ratio, a speeding-up of communication processes (and therefore greater productivity) and an improvement in the quality of decisions through being better informed. The three main groups of users, each with their own profile of communication requirements, will be considered separately: people in the office, people at home and people on the move.
Peter Bocker

Backmatter

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