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Über dieses Buch

This cutting edge book considers how advances in technologies and new media have transformed our perception of education, and focuses on the impact of the privatisation of digital tools as a mean of knowledge production. Arguing that education needs to adapt to the modern learner, the book’s unique approach is based on a disassociation with the deeply ingrained attitude with which people have traditionally viewed education – learning the existing symbolic systems of certain disciplines and then expressing themselves strictly within the operational modes of these systems. The ways of knowledge production – exploring, recording, representing, making meaning of and sharing human experiences – have been fundamentally transformed through the infusion of digital technologies into all aspects of human activity, allowing learners to engage with their immediate natural, social and cultural environments by capitalising on their individual abilities and interests. This book proposes a new approach to teaching and learning termed ‘cinematic bricolage’, which involves generating knowledge from heterogeneous resources in a ‘do-it-yourself’ manner while making meaning through multimodal representations. It shows how cinematic bricolage reconnects ways of knowing with ways of being, empowering the individual with a sense of personal identity and responsibility, helping to shape more aware social citizens.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
This chapter examines aspects of contemporary reality such as dynamic interconnectedness between the self and others and the enmeshment of human and technology logic. Throughout the following chapters, these two conceptual couplings are developed into undulating circularities that pulse through and activate all other circularities of the proposed pedagogical model. Current education methods are considered alienating the learner from their own psychological predispositions and their immediate natural/sociocultural environments. The proposed pedagogical model suggests establishing learning conditions in which the learner can reconnect with him/herself by discovering, extending and strengthening his/her natural abilities through a kindled reconnection with others, remixed with technological tools of knowledge-production and entanglement with their living experiences.
Lena Redman

Chapter 2. Paradigm Shift: From Far-Ends to Circularities

Abstract
This chapter discusses the supremacy of common puzzle-solving systems established by a particular set of scientific and moral principles characteristic of a certain historical period. In modern education, strict adherence to a specific set of paradigmatic assumptions and puzzle-solving methods converges to a centralised system of a benchmarked evaluation of students’ performance, manifesting in the glaring neglect of their individual psychological dispositions and needs. An emphasis on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education reinforces this imbalance and pushes humanities subjects further away from the curriculum. The chapter discusses some of the reasons for, and effects of, such a synthetic disturbance in the balance between the algorithmic(puzzle-solving) and androrithmic (human essence) parts of students’ development and argues for the reassessment and reconsideration of this biased state. To this end, the Ripple model suggests considering two operational learning circularities: divergence https://static-content.springer.com/image/chp%3A10.1007%2F978-981-13-1361-5_2/MediaObjects/466394_1_En_2_Figa_HTML.png convergence and conventional wisdom https://static-content.springer.com/image/chp%3A10.1007%2F978-981-13-1361-5_2/MediaObjects/466394_1_En_2_Figa_HTML.png individual curiosity.
Lena Redman

Chapter 3. Mind-Cinema and Cinematic Writing

Abstract
This chapter introduces the concept of mind-cinema and suggests viewing its embodiment on the pages of a digital document through the application of the genre of cinematic writing: writing with images, sounds and movements. Taking advantage of the affordances of digital media, the knower constructs their knowledge by recording the world around them and placing the bricole—material elements of the digital data—on software’s representational layers. In this, we can observe a feedback looping circularity of stimulus https://static-content.springer.com/image/chp%3A10.1007%2F978-981-13-1361-5_3/MediaObjects/466394_1_En_3_Figa_HTML.png response. The bricoles are viewed as the elements of a database, while the responses are the implicit reactions of the narrative dimension. The database bricoles are juxtaposed on the production layers by the composite organisation of the narrative steps, establishing narrative https://static-content.springer.com/image/chp%3A10.1007%2F978-981-13-1361-5_3/MediaObjects/466394_1_En_3_Figa_HTML.png database circularity. Therefore, the application of the narrative https://static-content.springer.com/image/chp%3A10.1007%2F978-981-13-1361-5_3/MediaObjects/466394_1_En_3_Figa_HTML.png database looping generates the representing https://static-content.springer.com/image/chp%3A10.1007%2F978-981-13-1361-5_3/MediaObjects/466394_1_En_3_Figa_HTML.png meaning-making circularity.
Lena Redman

Chapter 4. Writing a Subtext

Abstract
This chapter elaborates on the overtonal montage discussed in the previous chapter. It is the congruence of the dynamism of a given context with the key-element in the presentation. The key-element is interpreted in the context of the ‘collateral vibration’ that it is represented by, and the two are therefore inseparable. Leaning on alphabetic text as a methodology for articulating the mind that has been in use for millennia, cinematic writing suggests considering it as the key element in multimodal representations. Multimodal components are integrated into the alphabetic text not as additional embellishments but as an integral conglomerate in representing https://static-content.springer.com/image/chp%3A10.1007%2F978-981-13-1361-5_4/MediaObjects/466394_1_En_4_Figa_HTML.png meaning-making. The gestalt—an interplay of all modes—entails the compositional unity in which every element of different modes plays its own role in signifying meaning. Given that every individual has a unique perception of the world, it is people’s rhetorical sovereignty to express themselves using the semiotic resources most congruent to the articulations of their mind-cinemas.
Lena Redman

Chapter 5. Culture of Webworking: Knowing with an Endless Catalogue of Resources

Abstract
This chapter articulates the participatory character of digitised society facilitated by the ubiquity of postproduction tools. Liberalising the acquisition of cultural resources engenders a pervasive expansion of the universal phenomenon of remixing. In a digitised society, the remix spawns rapidly into a multi-hybridised category. It manifests itself through mashups, collages, montages, memes and vidding and becomes the prevalent medium of message-transmission. Its hybridisation is actualised not only within related modes of expressions but also within those that were considered incompatible before. Therefore, it is recognised as a form of deep remixability and is associated with the practices of do-it-yourself (DIY). Thus, people with even minimal knowledge of a given topic and having basic skills sufficient for their participation can engage in the social exchange of their opinions, representations and knowledge constructions. Following this trait, cinematic writing is merged with a DIY knowledge-production methodology based on a deep remixability hybrid that is termed cinematic bricolage.
Lena Redman

Chapter 6. Complexity of the World: Circular Interconnectedness

Abstract
This chapter frames cinematic bricolage (CB) into a systemic view of the world. According to natural science, the living organism is viewed within a systemic structure and in continuous interactions with its environment. By means of the feedback loops, it continuously undergoes self-organisation congruent to the medium of its existence. This chapter develops a contextual infrastructure for a learning model that is based on a view of dynamic ripplework and frames CB within its configuration. The teaching and learning approach underpinned by the ripplework infrastructure is termed the Ripple pedagogy or the Ripple model. The heartbeat of the Ripple pedagogy is charged by the regular feedback loops taking place within self-reflective https://static-content.springer.com/image/chp%3A10.1007%2F978-981-13-1361-5_6/MediaObjects/466394_1_En_6_Figa_HTML.png collaborative circularities. The core focus of the Ripple pedagogy is to create learning conditions in which the learner assimilates new knowledge and by self-designing, equilibrates him/herself with the environment by capitalising on individual psychological needs and abilities and in collaboration with others.
Lena Redman

Chapter 7. Cinematic Bricolage as Reconnected Learning

Abstract
Chapter seven delineates the infrastructural layers of the Ripple pedagogy . It establishes the Ripple model as a learner-centred, life-reconnected and inquiry-based approach to learning. The model is underpinned by the integrated system of five operational modes: self-reflection, collaboration, multimodal communication, distributed agency and DIY creativity. The students organise their learning tasks around their individual interests and abilities. Thus, they establish their reconnection with natural and sociocultural environments by discovering and cherishing their own innate inclinations and talents and through the application of multimodal ways of communication that suit most their personal predispositions. The progress of the learning task is activated by the feedback loops mobilised by self-reflective https://static-content.springer.com/image/chp%3A10.1007%2F978-981-13-1361-5_7/MediaObjects/466394_1_En_7_Figa_HTML.png collaborative circularity. Through utilising this mode of operation, the students exercise their own agency and learn to recognise and reconnect their own assertiveness with the agentic values of others, as well as the agentic power of the environments and the tools of production.
Lena Redman

Chapter 8. DIY Creativity: Culture of Self-Sufficiency

Abstract
This chapter suggests examining creativity as an underlying mechanism in the production of knowledge. Setting themselves up for the quest to formulate new, surprising, coherent, valuable and elegant concepts or products, students benefit from ‘making do’ with subjects that interest them and to which they are predisposed. Being intrinsically motivated, students put themselves under the pressure of circumstances through which they must find a solution to the set question of what if …? The DIY culture of the creative approach is considered an essential mode of operations. Students construct new knowledge not through the quality of final representations but through the development of the ability to use information and objects as psychological tools for finding a solution. This chapter discusses and proposes some creative strategies and techniques that can scaffold the dynamics of Ripple learning.
Lena Redman

Chapter 9. Engine Room of Creative Software

Abstract
This chapter discusses the implementation of mobile and stationary digital tools and resources of knowledge-production that are ubiquitously available to the modern learner. This chapter is an expedition into the ‘engine room’ of creative software. It delves into the specifics of the operational modes of digital objects construction. These modes are categorised as: numerical representation, automation, modularity, variability and transcoding. The chapter examines each of these categories in relation to how deep remixability can be realised and the role it plays in representational https://static-content.springer.com/image/chp%3A10.1007%2F978-981-13-1361-5_9/MediaObjects/466394_1_En_9_Figa_HTML.png meaning-making circularity within the context of the Ripple model. This chapter also examines reciprocity between the parallel structure of the mind perception and the instrumentality of the production layers of creative software. The link is examined from the point of view of unified sensory experiences and the unified projection of the production layers, thus, indicating a more precise representation of mental grasp and deeper awareness of sensory data in experiential meaning-making.
Lena Redman

Chapter 10. Assessment, Learning and Sociological Imagination: From Word-Count to the Value of Learning

Abstract
This chapter links the development of the Ripple model of knowing with the two probes implemented in my doctoral study for the trial of cinematic writing (CW) as a multimodal approach of representing https://static-content.springer.com/image/chp%3A10.1007%2F978-981-13-1361-5_10/MediaObjects/466394_1_En_10_Figa_HTML.png meaning-making, as well as cinematic bricolage (CB) as a methodology of gathering, recording, reorganising and analysing data. It starts with a discussion of a substantial problem that can be faced by the user of CW as a meaning-making approach. This is the assessment of a learning task by word-count. In contemporary learning conditions, the word-count assessment is designed such that that the importance of the number of linguistic symbols in articulating meaning draws to itself the entirety of time and effort allocated to the task. The Ripple pedagogy proposes the method of feedback loops, analysed and represented with self-reflective cinematic writing to be employed as an assessment methodology. This chapter also argues for considering the process of knowing as a social practice through which free minds can be cultivated to live in a democratic society.
Lena Redman

Chapter 11. Probes’ Review Decoding Symbols and Making-Meaning with Others

Abstract
Chapter eleven analyses the probes. It discusses the application of the multimodal metaphoric methodology in embodying the mind-cinema’s grasps within the context of the two examined probes. This investigation leads to the realisation that visual, audio or kinaesthetic symbols, often playing inconspicuously in our mind-cinema, can be infused with rich emotional value linked to certain events, situations or accumulated body of knowledge. If given the role of valued interlocutors and treated as coded messages from the unconscious, these symbols uncover things we did not pay enough attention to previously. The metaphoric logic of understanding one thing in terms of another, which in cinematic writing is amplified by the unification of a variety of representational modes, advances our self-awareness. Mapping links between our self-discoveries and other people’s representational expressions unfolds sociocultural connections and psychological coherence in the human perception of reality. This promotes the sense of self-agency—the ability not only to think critically but to act upon this criticality in accordance with individual strength and in collaboration with others.
Lena Redman

Chapter 12. Conclusion

Abstract
This chapter draws together ‘the ripples’ discussed throughout the book and provides a consolidated overview of the proposed Ripple pedagogy. Following the instrumentality of the Ripple model, this chapter oscillates back to the outset of the argument as a reminder of why pedagogical innovations are urgently necessary and why the current educational trends may prove themselves invalid in an ever-changing world. The Ripple model suggests a system of knowledge-construction based on the discovery and development of the individual’s intrinsic potential, and acting upon personal agency, reconnecting this potential with the natural and sociocultural environments of the learner. Learning through the equilibration of the internal milieu within the medium of existence is proposed as a life-savvy development, more essential in the rapidly changing world the than standardised, technological acquisition of knowledge.
Lena Redman

Backmatter

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