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Über dieses Buch

This book reconciles competing and sometimes contradictory forms of land use, while also promoting sustainable land use options. It highlights land use planning, spatial planning, territorial (or regional) planning, and ecosystem-based or environmental land use planning as tools that strengthen land governance. Further, it demonstrates how to use these types of land-use planning to improve economic opportunities based on sustainable management of land resources, and to develop land use options that strike a balance between conservation and development objectives.

Competition for land is increasing as demand for multiple land uses and ecosystem services rises. Food security issues, renewable energy and emerging carbon markets are creating pressures for the conversion of agricultural land to other uses such as reforestation and biofuels. At the same time, there is a growing demand for land in connection with urbanization and recreation, mining, food production, and biodiversity conservation. Managing the increasing competition between these services, and balancing different stakeholders’ interests, requires efficient allocation of land resources.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
Competition for land is increasing as demand for multiple land uses and ecosystem services rises.
Graciela Metternicht

Chapter 2. Planning: Definitions and Evolution in the Context of SLM

Abstract
Planning is contained within, and constrained by, economic and political forces, and priorities (Owens 1992).
Graciela Metternicht

Chapter 3. Principles of Best Practice in Land Use Planning for SLM

Abstract
Unpacking the different aspects of SLM (i.e., maximizing economic and social benefits, and maintaining or enhancing the ecological support functions of land resources).
Graciela Metternicht

Chapter 4. Contributions of Land Use Planning to Sustainable Land Use and Management

Abstract
This Chapter discusses the contributions of LUP to the identification and promotion of sustainable land use and management options (Table 4.4). LUP (including spatial planning) fosters a participatory definition of future land uses. Keeping LUP in mind is therefore useful whenever natural resources and/or biodiversity need to be protected, rehabilitated, or when unexplored land use potential needs to be identified and evaluated (see Sect. 4.4) (GIZ 2012).
Graciela Metternicht

Chapter 5. Land Use Planning for Advancing Internationally Agreed Development Goals

Abstract
In September 2015, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the 2030 agenda for sustainable development, a plan of action for people, the planet and prosperity (UNGA 2015).
Graciela Metternicht

Chapter 6. Concluding Remarks

Abstract
This brief presented evidence and lessons of best practice of LUP for sustainable land use and management.
Graciela Metternicht

Backmatter

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