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31.01.2020 | Original Paper | Ausgabe 4/2020

Biodiversity and Conservation 4/2020

Landscape anthropization shapes the survival of a top avian scavenger

Zeitschrift:
Biodiversity and Conservation > Ausgabe 4/2020
Autoren:
Eneko Arrondo, Ana Sanz-Aguilar, Juan Manuel Pérez-García, Ainara Cortés-Avizanda, José Antonio Sánchez-Zapata, José Antonio Donázar
Wichtige Hinweise
Communicated by Karen E. Hodges.

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (https://​doi.​org/​10.​1007/​s10531-020-01942-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
Eneko Arrondo and Ana Sanz-Aguilar have contributed equally to this work.

Publisher's Note

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Abstract

Events of non-natural mortality in human-dominated landscapes are especially challenging for populations of large vertebrates with K strategies. Among birds, vultures are one of the most threatened groups experiencing sharp population declines due to non-natural mortality. Factors causing non-natural mortality are usually studied separately. However, the potential use of an integrated index able to predict large-scale mortality risks of avian scavengers could be especially useful for planning conservation strategies. Here, we used the Human Footprint index to examine the impact of landscape anthropization on the survival rates of 66 GPS-tagged adult Eurasian griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus) in two Spanish regions. Foraging in more anthropized areas resulted in a significantly higher individual mortality risk mainly due to collisions with vehicles, poisonings, electrocutions and fatalities with wind turbines. Mean yearly survival rates were estimated at 0.817 ± 0.043 SE and 0.968 ± 0.018 SE for individuals from the more and less anthropized regions, respectively. Additional research should investigate whether some vulture populations could be acting as sinks unnoticed due to metapopulation dynamics. From a broader point of view, our study shows that a straightforward Human Footprint was a useful index to predict the survival of top scavengers and can be highly applicable to planning large-scale conservation measures.

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