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Über dieses Buch

This book argues that organizations, corporations, and governments have the abilities and resources to drive deep systemic change, yet fail to evoke change strategies that can significantly improve the social fabric of our global environment. It actively engages the reader in a conversation that reviews, evaluates, and challenges these issues juxtaposed to current strategies and resulting positions regarding business ethics, social responsibility, our view towards humanity, and the role of leaders.
Provocative in its voice and message, this book demonstrates how more robust contributions can lead to effective change. The author includes a detailed change model designed to invoke significant global change that builds upon the current work of the United Nations’ Global Compact, and incorporates the participation of all critical stakeholders including corporate leaders, civil society, government leaders, and the people who are challenged daily by ethical dilemmas and social responsibility initiatives. It speaks to academics and students of change management, social responsibility, and business ethics, as well as the organizations and communities who stand to make a positive difference in the world.


Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
This book argues that organizations, corporations, and governments have the abilities and resources to drive deep systemic change, yet fail to evoke change strategies that can significantly improve the social fabric of our global environment. It actively engages the reader in a conversation that reviews, evaluates, and challenges these issues juxtaposed to current strategies and resulting positions regarding business ethics, social responsibility, our view towards humanity, and the role of leaders.
Provocative in its voice and message, this book demonstrates how more robust contributions can lead to effective change. The author includes a detailed change model designed to invoke significant global change that builds upon the current work of the United Nations’ Global Compact, and incorporates the participation of all critical stakeholders including corporate leaders, civil society, government leaders, and the people who are challenged daily by ethical dilemmas and social responsibility initiatives. It speaks to academics and students of change management, social responsibility, and business ethics, as well as the organizations and communities who stand to make a positive difference in the world.
Christopher Anne Robinson-Easley

The Issues and Parameters of Plausible Change

Frontmatter

Chapter 2. Our World, Our Lens, Our Choices

Abstract
Over the past few years, my perspectives on change have dramatically changed. When I wrote for the academy, my focus was primarily on the utilization of management, organizational behavior, and organization development change strategies designed to produce primarily structural change in the environments in which I either worked or consulted. Yet, there was a deep burning in my soul that strongly suggested something was missing.
Christopher Anne Robinson-Easley

Chapter 3. Through the Lens of Business Ethics

Abstract
Even in the midst of an organization possessing a code of ethics, there are varying organizational behaviors and personal attributes that will moderate how that code of ethics is understood and implemented.
Christopher Anne Robinson-Easley

Chapter 4. The Current Landscape

Abstract
My aim for this book is not to rehash issues, but to provide a different lens through which to examine those issues and, more importantly, to provide solutions. And, while I have previously touched on a few of the burning concerns, there are more, too many to discuss in this. There are far too many injustices allowed in our global village that need to be stopped and immediately remedied. I will only discuss a few more, and their connectivity to the broader systems, which beg the attention of governments, corporations, NGOs and other social service organizations.
Christopher Anne Robinson-Easley

Chapter 5. The Friedman Versus Korten Argument: Are These Dichotomies Still Valid in the Twenty-First Century?

Abstract
Many years ago, when I taught my first introduction to business class at my former university, I was appalled to see that the textbook chosen provided such limited coverage on the topic of social responsibility. The primary views on social responsibility presented in this textbook were those of Dr. Milton Friedman—a view I felt to be very limited.
Christopher Anne Robinson-Easley

Through the Lens of Ethics and Social Responsibility: Imagine a World of Change

Frontmatter

Chapter 6. Reclaiming Our World: The United Nations Global Compact in the Midst of a Vision of Change

Abstract
For people to produce change in the world, they need to be able to vision the change. When I vision a world of change, I first see the basic needs of people across the globe being met. I vision people having shelter, clean water to drink and bathe in and a total elimination of child labor along with children living happy productive lives without hurting bellies because they have not eaten for days. I vision good physical health and an elimination of those diseases caused by the environment or the lack of basic food, water and shelter. I also vision equality; an environment where the worth of people is not predicated upon preference for gender, race or ethnicity.
Christopher Anne Robinson-Easley

Chapter 7. Leaders as the Linchpins of Change

Abstract
There are many ‘academic’ definitions of leadership that effectively address the critical core competencies leaders need to possess, but these definitions do not reflect the real inner work that is necessary for one to become a true global change agent. Leaders who want to bring about transformational change have the ability to invoke a mass movement towards authentically addressing the many issues that are raised in the Global Compact.
Christopher Anne Robinson-Easley

Chapter 8. Living the Ideal: A Proposed Model for Change

Abstract
On a global level, sustainable development coordinates growth in terms of economics (organizing exchanges between countries and developing the less privileged areas), addresses social issues (access to healthcare, education and defending good working conditions) and protects the environment and the disappearance of natural resources (Bouglet et al. 2012). Because these issues impact more than just an organization, there is no way around the inclusion of multiple stakeholders (2012).
Christopher Anne Robinson-Easley

Chapter 9. Living and Sustaining the Ideal

Abstract
Intentionally added to the model that is discussed in Chapter Eight are arrows that suggest the need to repeat the cycle. The reasons for this are simple. First and foremost, albeit a cliché, we do indeed live in a global environment that is dynamically changing. Yet, I believe that this dynamic change is also calling for a dynamic shift in consciousness for everyone that inhabits our globe. Not everyone will be able to make that shift in consciousness, which produces a shift in behaviors and subsequent actions and outcomes. But I believe when we engage a critical mass of people, change at all levels can and will occur.
Christopher Anne Robinson-Easley

Chapter 10. Concluding Comments

Abstract
In the beginning of this book, I said our world is in crisis. We have issues that have continued to manifest for far too many years and many still remain either unaddressed or insufficiently addressed. These issues impede people living productive lives and in many cases, in developing as well as undeveloped countries, they impede the productive lives of our most important resource—our children. As I have worked towards finishing this book, our situations, nationally and internationally, worsen.
Christopher Anne Robinson-Easley

Backmatter

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