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Über dieses Buch

This book offers alternatives to typical leadership, highlighting new ways of thinking about how individuals can lead effectively. Specifically, it integrates several fields, including neuroscience, behavioral economics, mindfulness, cognitive and social psychology, emotional intelligence, and management decision-making. The authors challenge the “common sense,” mainstream thinking about leadership, arguing that effective leadership depends on a more complicated understanding of the underlying dynamics.When leaders rely on the common sense that they have been taught explicitly or implicitly about leadership, the results are often not effective—for themselves personally, for their followers, for the organizations in which they lead, and for society as a whole. For example, aspiring leaders often believe that the mark of good leaders is their ability to come up with quick answers to problems. Others believe that one’s ability to minimize complexity and uncertainty indicates leadership potential. In addition, despite the literature suggesting the value of engaging in self-reflection, few leaders regularly step back and look inward. Even those who can intellectually discuss emotional intelligence often focus on their ability to influence the emotions of others rather than reflecting on and learning from their own emotions.The book calls for leaders to operate with more humility and greater awareness of the multiple contexts in which they function—approaches that improve life for all organizational members. As leaders become more effective, they will become healthier and more satisfied, less harried, more grounded, and more fulfilled in their lives.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
We, as leaders, face daunting challenges. Most days confront us with an impressive mix of issues with which to deal. Ideally, as leaders, we have many moments of satisfaction, even exhilaration, and if we do, we have earned them. Consider these two leaders, Marie and Brennan, trying their best to be effective in very different situations but, in these moments, feeling quite some distance from exhilaration.
Wiley C. Davi, Duncan H. Spelman

Chapter 2. Pause

Abstract
Steve Jobs, the iconic leader of Apple, was quite famous for his compelling presentations in front of large audiences. Typically, he was the master showman in those settings, seemingly in complete control and able to evoke exactly the audience response he sought. However, in an atypical moment before a large group in 1997, Jobs displayed an uncommon approach to leadership, utilizing the first component of our uncommon leadership practice—he paused. Jobs was in front of Apple’s Worldwide Developers’ Conference when an audience member asked a question embedded in a scathing insult, attacking Jobs’ knowledge and competence. For about 10 seconds, he said nothing, a highly unusual moment in such an event, after which he was able to respond to the substantive issues raised by the questioner without getting hooked by the personal attack [1].
Wiley C. Davi, Duncan H. Spelman

Chapter 3. Introspect: Be Humble

Abstract
For 16 years, Tom Ashbrook was the popular and successful host of the nationally syndicated NPR radio program “On Point,” through which he reached 2 million daily listeners. The show was born in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks and became a platform for serious investigation of political, social, and cultural issues. In early 2018, Ashbrook was fired following an investigation of complaints from people who worked for him about an abusive work environment. As many as 23 employees reported that Ashbrook had engaged in intimidating and demeaning behavior. One news account of the climate on the show said people were coached to, “never interrupt Ashbrook, never challenge him, and only answer yes, no or I’ll check on that” [1].
Wiley C. Davi, Duncan H. Spelman

Chapter 4. Introspect: Be Emotional

Abstract
In the spring of 2018, Emma Gonzalez emerged as one of the most compelling leaders among the group of students from Parkland, Florida, who survived the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. She and her schoolmates sparked a national movement focused on stopping the wave of gun violence in the United States. Gonzalez was 18 years old, Cuban-American, and out about her bisexuality—and she was well-known for her shaved head [1]. While not necessarily fitting the traditional image of a leader, she demonstrated a powerful capacity to access and communicate her emotions as she influenced literally millions of people.
Wiley C. Davi, Duncan H. Spelman

Chapter 5. Introspect: Be “Impolite”

Abstract
These are the first two lines of Pat Parker’s poem For the White Person Who Wants to Know How to Be My Friend [1]. They capture the complexity that leaders face in dealing with social identities, all those differences of race, gender, age, class, sexual identity, religion, and much more that their coworkers, clients, competitors, and they themselves bring to the workplace.
Wiley C. Davi, Duncan H. Spelman

Chapter 6. Introspect: Be Uncertain

Abstract
The most successful art forger of the twentieth century was Han Van Meegeren who, among other dastardly deeds, created and sold six fake Vermeer paintings in the brief period between 1937 and 1943 for the equivalent of 30 million of today’s dollars. Adding to the intrigue of Van Meegeren’s crimes was that one of his victims was Hermann Göring, the second most powerful monster in Nazi Germany. Johannes Vermeer, the artist who Van Meegeren impersonated on canvas, is one of the best known and most beloved painters of the Dutch Golden Age, probably most famous today for his “Girl with a Pearl Earring.” Vermeer lived from 1632 to 1675 and produced only 35 or so paintings that are known today. The scarcity of his work adds to its value.
Wiley C. Davi, Duncan H. Spelman

Chapter 7. Act

Abstract
King Lear, one of history’s most famous leaders, faces a big decision. As the 80-year-old ruler of ancient Britain nears the end of his life, he needs to make plans for the future of his kingdom. He creates a process for making the decision and he acts. Tragically, his actions turn out to be ill-advised, and Shakespeare’s tragedy concludes with a lot of dead bodies. Had Lear used some uncommon sense, things might have turned out differently.
Wiley C. Davi, Duncan H. Spelman

Chapter 8. Conclusion: Going Forward

Abstract
Finally, we have arrived at the final chapter! We have detailed the elements of leading with uncommon sense—pause, introspect, and act—highlighting the reminders to be humble, be emotional, be “impolite,” and be uncertain. We have suggested ways to avoid the common traps that snag our thinking (Fig. 8.1).
Wiley C. Davi, Duncan H. Spelman

Backmatter

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