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This book utilizes critical discourse analysis to illuminate the ways in which one of the largest agribusinesses in operation, Tyson Foods, disguises their actions whilst simultaneously presenting the image of a benign, good corporate citizen. Schally unveils how the discourses employed by Tyson gain legitimacy by drawing on and aligning with larger cultural discourses that are often taken for granted and not adequately scrutinised. This original research, situated at the intersection of green and cultural criminologies, contributes to these current perspectives as well as to the burgeoning social harm approach within criminology.
A bold and engaging study, this book will be indispensable for students and scholars of green criminology, corporate crime, animals and society, and environmental sociology, as well as environmental and animal rights activists.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
This chapter introduces the topic of the discursive construction of corporate harm and orients the work theoretically. The chapter also outlines the focus of the book, which is to answer the question of how agribusinesses culturally legitimize their harmful practices.
Jennifer L. Schally

Chapter 2. Industrial Agriculture and Its Harms

Abstract
This chapter provides an overview of industrial agriculture and its harms, especially to animals, in order to provide a vivid and alarming context for my analysis of Tyson Foods’ website. First, the origins of industrial agriculture are traced. The chapter continues with emphasis on some of the particular harms of raising and processing animals for food in the industrial system, specifically harm to animals, harm to the environment, and harm to human health.
Jennifer L. Schally

Chapter 3. The Nature of Tyson’s Harms

Abstract
This chapter explores and discusses some noteworthy cases of harm perpetrated by Tyson. Cases include multiple incidents of animal harm recorded via undercover video at Tyson processing plants and contracted farms as well as multiple documented environmental harms that resulted in legal action against Tyson.
Jennifer L. Schally

Chapter 4. Contextualizing the “Socially Responsible” Corporation and the Cultural Legitimation of Harm

Abstract
Corporate harms and their legitimation are situated within a complex cultural, structural, and historical landscape. This chapter is an effort to illuminate that landscape. The unifying argument of this chapter is that Tyson’s harm/socially responsible discourse reflects general attitudes about harm to nonhumans and corporate power, as well as weak corporate regulation. In addition, Tyson’s harm/discourse cannot be understood without also understanding the history of corporate public relations or “spin,” and its contemporary conduit par excellence, the corporate web page, and the particularly modern “need” for companies to project social responsibility.
Jennifer L. Schally

Chapter 5. Disguising Harms: Talking and Not Talking About It

Abstract
This chapter discusses how Tyson disguises their actions toward animals and the environment. Unexamined, the passages from Tyson’s website that discuss the environment and animal well-being give the impression that Tyson is proactive and transparent. On closer inspection, we find that Tyson says a lot about their beliefs, but very little about what they are actually doing.
Jennifer L. Schally

Chapter 6. Being Good: Or at Least Not Bad

Abstract
This chapter discusses the ways that Tyson presents themselves benignly and as part of a decent whole. Tyson presents themselves as part of a decent whole by aligning themselves with popular cultural values, and they present themselves benignly by constructing an image of a good corporate citizen/neighbor.
Jennifer L. Schally

Chapter 7. Taking Stock, Taking Action

Abstract
This chapter provides a synthesis and reflection on the preceding chapters. In sum, my project finds that Tyson obscures their actions toward animals and the environment by talking about them abstractly or not at all. The chapter also reflects on possible future research as well as how change may be effected.
Jennifer L. Schally

Backmatter

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