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Über dieses Buch

Build five robots to overcome obstacles and lead a team of explorers deep into a Mayan tomb. You are along for the ride with Evan and his archaeologist uncle as they explore a Mayan pyramid complete with traps and treasures. Using a variety of EV3 robots, the archaeology team is able to move deeper into the tomb, all the way to the sarcophagus of King Ixtua. But beware of the traps! The pyramid's design has successfully deterred unwanted visitors through the centuries, and your team will need to be careful and alert.

LEGO MINDSTORMS EV3: The Mayan Adventure guides in the design, construction, and programming of unique explorer robots to open “the newly discovered tomb of an ancient Mayan king." You will learn and use a workmanlike design methodology that teaches you about your robot’s motors and sensors. Complete building and programming instructions are provided for each robot, giving you as much guidance as you want, to learn as you build.

you="" help="" evan="" and="" the="" team="" of="" explorers="" navigate="" through="" old="" pyramid="" gain="" entry="" to="" king="" ixtua's="" tomb?="" read="" stories,="" dig="" in="" environments,="" create="" robots="" that="" will="" reveal="" secrets="" mayan="" adventure. Updates the beloved Mayan Adventure to the latest LEGO MINDSTORMS EV3 hardware and software. Shows how to build all five EV3 robots to solve real-world problems.Includes Design Journal pages and Engineering Notes that encourage constructive brainstorming.

What You Will LearnBegin your first robot right away – one that can open a long-lost Mayan king’s tomb

Learn a design process, backed up by written forms and step-by-step support

Gain true skill in brainstorming and problem solving, and in the testing and fixing of robots

Share design documents with other “Mayan archaeologists,” teachers, and robotic engineers

Begin a design tool collection for use in future projects

Who This Book Is For

The new user who wants step-by-step building and programming instructions, teachers interested in real engineering design methods and systems thinking, and parents wanting an engaging story along with projects to strengthen the bond with a son or daughter

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Tomb, Trap, and Trigger

Abstract
The Archeology Storyline: The story starts on Day 2 of an expedition to explore a Mayan tomb. Evan, the young owner of a new EV3 kit, is with his archeologist uncle. The tomb has traps and obstacles - will Evan's robots save the day?
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 2. ExploroBot: Planning and Design

Abstract
In this chapter you’re going to learn (drum-roll, please—cue the announcer) . . .
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 3. ExploroBot: Build It

Abstract
Before you begin building the ExploroBot, take a look at Figure 3-1. Remember, this is just one possible version of the ExploroBot. Some of you might choose to design and build your own version without going through this chapter, but for those who want to build the one pictured, I have a few suggestions.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 4. ExploroBot: Program It

Abstract
Your ExploroBot looks nice, but it really doesn’t do much yet, does it? That’s about to change. In this chapter you’re going to create the program that sends the bot down the tunnel (and back) to trigger the locked tomb door. So, let’s get started.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 5. String, Pebbles, and Gravity

Abstract
The Archeology Storyline: Day 3: Inside King Ixtua’s Tomb, 8:13 AM Evan looked into the tunnel. The ExploroBot was about four feet away but still moving toward the tunnel exit. A few minutes earlier the ExploroBot had reached the trigger; some unusual sounds were heard behind the tomb door and then a loud BANG! While Evan listened for his bot to turn around and return, his uncle and a few other team members began pushing on the large stone door.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 6. StringBot: Planning

Abstract
What’s needed to solve this latest challenge is a bot that can move along a string, carry a small object, drop that object at a specific location, and return for another object to do it all over again.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 7. StringBot: Build It

Abstract
Figure 7-1 shows my version of the StringBot. It’s a strange-looking device, but it does work. If you ever want to have some fun, try showing your bot design to others who are unfamiliar with it. Ask them, “What do you think it does?” and be ready for some unexpected answers! I showed this to a couple of people and the most surprising response was this: “How does it roll along the floor with only one wheel? The smaller wheels don’t look like they’ll help hold it up.” Just goes to show that you cannot judge a book (or a bot, in this case) by its cover.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 8. StringBot: Program It

Abstract
The StringBot is a unique little bot. When you ask someone to describe a robot, my guess is that he or she will probably have a mental picture of a wheeled robot or a bot with legs. Our StringBot has neither—it’s going to move along a string. But whether your bot has wheels, legs, or some other method for moving, it has to be programmed properly to accomplish its desired tasks. The StringBot needs to move along a string, successfully drop a small object into a jar, then return to you. This chapter will show you how to make that happen.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 9. Scroll, Key, and Camera

Abstract
Location: Southwest Guatemala
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 10. SnapShotBot: Planning and Design

Abstract
There are many elements to this challenge’s bot. First, we have to figure out how to properly place the bot in the room. Then, the bot needs to take a picture of the library. After that, the bot needs to circle around the basket (still holding the twine) and return to the team so that they can pull the two ends of the twine to retrieve the basket and the key. Like I said, we have a lot to accomplish with this little bot. So let’s get to work.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 11. SnapShotBot: Build It

Abstract
Go ahead and take a look at Evan’s version of the SnapShotBot in Figure 11-1. It’s a weird-looking little bot, but, then again, I like strange-looking robots . . . and this one definitely qualifies. As you can see, the Color Sensor is located at the front. I’ve placed the camera toward the center of the bot at an upward angle. The weight of the Brick is sufficient to keep the bot from tipping over, thankfully.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 12. SnapShotBot: Program It

Abstract
You might think that programming the SnapShotBot is a little more involved than the previous bots. Although this program might be a little larger in size, the truth is that you’re already experienced with all the programming blocks you’ll need.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 13. Get In, Grab It, Get Out

Abstract
Evan laughed as he watched his uncle slowly pull the twine. His uncle kept trying to grab the basket, but it was still four or five feet away. Evan could tell his uncle was anxious to retrieve the key.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 14. GrabberBot: Planning and Design

Abstract
With those requirements in mind, let’s move forward and develop a solution to this challenge.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 15. GrabberBot: Build It

Abstract
Building the GrabberBot: I realized after I completed the design that if I removed the sensors and the Grabber assembly, I would be left with a nice base unit that could be used in future designs. But that’s not what this chapter is about. This chapter gives you the building instructions for constructing a bot that can move down the tunnel and successfully retrieve the scroll.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 16. GrabberBot: Program It

Abstract
Programming the GrabberBot: I’ll place a block, configure it, download it to my bot, and then test it. If the bot doesn’t perform as anticipated, I’ll reexamine the block and its configuration settings and see whether I’ve made a mistake.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 17. Bravery, Wisdom, and Honor

Abstract
The Archeology Storyline: Evan’s uncle had unrolled the small scroll with gloved hands, careful not to tear the thin parchment. After Max had finished photographing the Mayan writing on the scroll, Uncle Phillip had given the scroll to Grace for translation. That had been two hours earlier, and now Evan was sitting with his uncle and Max in the tent, waiting for Grace to complete her initial review of the scroll’s contents...
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 18. PushBot: Planning and Design

Abstract
The bot for this next challenge will perform its tasks by doing the opposite—pushing the figurines into their proper locations.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 19. PushBot: Build It

Abstract
PushBot - Construction: In this case, I started the design by fiddling with the medium motor and a cage assembly, using the rounded gears at a 90-degree angle. I based it on an earlier design that used a large motor. But since I am using the retail EV3 kit, I have two large motors and one medium motor. So I started working on that problem first. I knew that designing a driving base would be fairly easy, but I had never designed a jaw assembly like this one.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 20. PushBot: Program It

Abstract
Programming the PushBot: The PushBot has a lot to do! Because of this, I want to be absolutely certain that my program works, and I’ll be testing it often. To make it easier on myself, I’m going to break down the program into three sections. The first section covers getting the bot to the proper location in front of the first figurine. The second section covers the programming blocks used to put the first three figurines into their proper locations. And the final section is devoted to pushing the last figurine up the ramp and onto the Mayan sarcophagus.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Chapter 21. Discovery, Secret, and Home

Abstract
The Archeology Storyline: The past few days had been a flurry of activity, with Evan assisting Uncle Phillip, Max, and Grace to take pictures and measurements, draw sketches, and weigh artifacts. Evan had never had this much fun in his life. He had taken part in opening King Ixtua’s tomb and helped discover the king’s burial chamber.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Appendix A. THE MINDSTORMS Community and EV3 Web Sites

Abstract
LEGO has created a powerful tool for you to share your robotic creations with the world! It’s a web site called MINDSTORMS Community. This is an official LEGO web site, so it’s totally safe for kids. The MINDSTORMS Community is constantly growing and changing, so some features might not be available when you visit. But you’ll enjoy seeing all the other robots that people are submitting, and hopefully you’ll start submitting your own. This appendix is a brief overview of how it works.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Appendix B. Robot Commander Remote Control App

Abstract
The ROBOT COMMANDER app can operate every aspect of your EV3 robots. It can control motors, both large and medium. It can give you a joystick or slider bars to control motors singly or in combination. It can also report the status of your sensors. This is exceptionally useful for testing a new design without writing any software.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Appendix C. Kit Organization: Where Do All Those Parts Go?

Abstract
Handling parts storage: A multi-compartment box is ideal, so parts can be kept in categories. Figures C-1 and C-2 show a top and bottom stacking storage box with places for everything.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Appendix D. Building Instructions for Bots

Abstract
If you build a unique bot of some sort, someone with an EV3 kit might ask you for instructions on building a duplicate. There are numerous methods for demonstrating how to build a robot that you have designed. One easy method is to simply digitally record yourself building it, talking as you go and showing to the camera the pieces you are using and where you place them. I’d like to also introduce to you something called CAD (computer aided design) software.
Mark Bell, James Floyd Kelly

Backmatter

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