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Über dieses Buch

Jan Hauke Holste analyzes how a company can innovate and change its business model to the degree that it can climb up the value chain. His research synthesizes a combination of the global value chain and the business model literature to create a new framework of local firm upgrading. The findings of an empirical test of the model indicate that local firms are more than just a link within a global value chain. Each firm has a choice and inter-firm differences indicate that there is a strong firm level factor. Next to other factors, the founder is the key driver of local firm upgrading. He is possibly the most important element within a firm.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

1. Introduction

Abstract
Over the past few years, the value chain concept has increasingly gained attention both from the world of business and the world of academia (Humprey, 2004; Gualani et al. 2005; Schmitz, 2006; Gereffi, 2009; Gereffi and Lee, 2012). Research has focused on the governance structure of global value chains (GVC) and its implication for firms to learn, innovate and upgrade their relative position in the value chain. As revealed by export-oriented growth and development strategies that were successfully pursued by Asian countries, this is not merely of academic interest. The so-called Asian Tigers (Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan) show that a country can achieve growth and prosperity even if it starts out at the wrong end of the international labour division, or in other words, on the lowest point in the value chain.
Jan Hauke Holste

2. Literature Review

Abstract
This chapter will review two sets of literature; the GVC literature and the business model (innovation) literature. The main arguments are discussed in light of the research question and used as a theoretical framework on which the empirical part is build. By reviewing the recent literature, this chapter situates this research in the context of those two streams of literature, in the hope of finding and generating synergies.
Jan Hauke Holste

3. Methodology

Abstract
“Sound empirical research begins with strong grounding in related literature, identifies a research gap, and proposes research questions that address the gap” (Eisenhardt and Graebner; p. 26). The idea is thus to open the „black box“ (Coe et al. 2008) of the local firm in the GVC with the tools provided by the business model canvas as introduced by Osterwalder et al. (2010). To add the perspective of the local firm and the business model canvas to the GVC literature, rigorous empirical research has to be conducted. To answer the research question, primary data has to be collected at the local firm level. The best way to gain an in-depth understanding of individual cases of local firms is the collection of semi-structured, qualitative analysed interviews. In light of the complexity of the questions and the confidentiality of the information, the interview is conducted face-to-face and only recorded if the interviewee has given his consent. As a result, the sample size is relatively small and has to be carefully chosen.
Jan Hauke Holste

4. Data and Data Analysis

Abstract
The quality and transferability (generalizability) of the results depends on the analytical skills of the researcher. This is one of the greatest strength of qualitative research, but also a major weakness. Therefore, it is crucial that the process of how the raw data is analysed is clearly documented (Eisenhardt and Graebner, 2007). Only a full disclose of the process allows other researchers to evaluate the quality of the analyses and reproduce the findings.
Jan Hauke Holste

5. Results

Abstract
Following the description of how the data was analysed the results will be presented, interpreted and evaluated in this chapter. Firstly, the interviewees and their companies will be discussed (anonymised) in terms of function/job title in the company and company size. Then each core category from the business model canvas will be presented. Additionally, code schemes, which were not covered by the core categories, but grounded in the data are presented. This is followed by a presentation of the findings. Finally, an adaption of the business model canvas will be presented as a tentative model to answer the research question.
Jan Hauke Holste

6. Conclusion, Discussion and Limitations

Abstract
Empirical research is conducted to find answers, but to put it in the words of Jonny Nash “There are more questions than answers. And the more I find out the less I know”. This statement is especially true in the case of this study, as it was exploratory and conducted to open the black box of the local firm in the light of GVCs, with a tool provided by the business model literature. The results and findings will be discussed in this chapter, and limitations and questions for further research will be presented. Finally, a conclusion from an academically as well as practical point of view will be presented.
Jan Hauke Holste

Backmatter

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