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Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Keynote Paper — Management at the Work Face

1. Keynote Paper — Management at the Work Face

Abstract
If one considers that every person employed except the chief executive has a manager over him, the vital importance of these managerial-subordinate relationships will be easily recognised. Yet no generally accepted definition of the term ‘Manager’ exists.
Lord Wilfred Brown

The Construction Client

2. Glc Housing: Policies, Programmes and Management

Abstract
This paper sets out to describe the methods adopted by the GLC in its house procurement programme. While size and content of programmes may be changed by political direction, the method by which the programmes are controlled need not. This paper, therefore, will describe the formulation of detailed programmes; methods of budget allocations to programme areas; functional roles and corporate planning and control.
Gordon H. Wigglesworth, Stephen R. Thake

3. Management of Commercial Development Programmes

Abstract
I suggest that there are two essential ingredients to commercial development: (1) Land (2) Confidence. One is important because more cannot be created, the other, because it must be, if decisions to develop are to be made.
G. S. Ayres

The Management of Time, Cost and Quality

4. Design Management

Abstract
To speak of design management, it is first necessary to agree how management and design are to be defined, and what they may comprise. Design could have a narrow meaning, that of contriving a scheme. Here, it is to have a broader interpretation, that is, the total of the activities of the designers for a project in construction.
Tony Stevens

5. Professional Responsibilities

Abstract
I am very anxious to make one point from the start. The conference information leaflet states: ‘This conference aims to review and evaluate recent management thinking and techniques and their application to the special needs of the construction industry and its clients’. Having never (regrettably) studied management theory, I must ask you to accept my thoughts this afternoon not as those of an expert management theorist, but as the ideas of a practising Quantity Surveyor, albeit one who has had more opportunity than most to study and discuss the practical application of the theory contained within the standard forms of building contracts.
Jon Steer

6. Production Management

Abstract
Production management is concerned with getting the right resources to the right location at the right time. It is concerned with motivating men. The project must be kept moving.
Brian Fine

International Comparisons

7. Contractual Systems in the EEC

Abstract
There have been many papers presented to conferences such as this which seek to explain and compare contractual systems in the EEC countries. We and our associates have contributed our share—probably more than our share—to the welter of words on the subject. We make no apology for this but we believe that we must now do more than explain and compare. We must evaluate. We must point to the advantages and disadvantages of the several systems and we must point the way to the best procedures for the future.
W. G. Bryan, W. Thomas

8. The American Approach to Contracting

Abstract
A summary of the various methods for contracting the construction of buildings in America is a task which I approach with considerable caution. To undertake such a review is to walk where angels fear to tread. The procedures for selecting the organisation to supervise, manage and perform building construction and the types of contracts available have proliferated in recent years because of the increasing complexity of building designs, escalating costs, legal constraints, magnitude of public projects, accelerated social needs, and increasing demands on building owners and their staffs. No such summary can help but omit many significant variants in contracting methods.
Edward C. Wundram

9. Multi-National Working: The Challenge of Work Overseas

Abstract
In the third and second millenia B.C., the Phoenicians, operating from the eastern shores of the Mediterranean, mainly from what is now modern Lebanon, built and manned seagoing ships and travelled, daring the unknown, to seek markets for their merchandise. Thus, international trade, which may be defined simply as ‘the exchange of goods and services among nations’, has its origins in ancient civilisations.
Nijad N. Hammam

Increasing Client Satisfaction

10. Contractual Options in the UK

Abstract
Although I am currently working for a government department, I do not speak here with an official voice. My paper carries no official overtones and is only the private opinion of a chartered quantity surveyor whose career has been mainly outside the civil service.
Eric W. McCanlis

11. Developing Managers for the Construction Industry

Abstract
With the exception of a few big firms, and some energetic efforts from the professional institutions, managers aren’t ‘developed’ at all for the construction industry. Craftsmen and professional specialists are developed, but managers just happen. They develop themselves as they struggle along: hardly ever taking time to reflect on what they have learned, and how they have learned it, because they never seem to have the time available. Like all deeply traditional industries, the construction industry makes or breaks its managers by hurling them in at the deep end, rather than intelligently and purposefully ‘developing’ them. Most of the people who have reached the top have either started there as the sons of their fathers, or have got there the hard way.
John Morris
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