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Über dieses Buch

The growing role of science and technology in modern society has generated a need for unique management skills on the part of scientists and engineers. While this need is widely recognized, there is little agreement on the most appropriate way in which it should be satisfied. The general literature on management does not usually recognize the problems that are unique to those engaged in science and high technology. This lack is also reflected in the considerable variety of formal management training, which more often than not has missed its mark, at least when judged by the response of participating scientists and engineers. My recent experience, teaching graduate students and prac­ ticing scientists and engineers about those aspects of manage­ ment that are likely to be most relevant to their future endea­ vors, has been the principle motivation for this book. The book reflects some of what I have learned from that experience and has been further encouraged by the convic­ tions that (1) the distribution of management potential among engi­ neers and scientists is no different from that of other groups with comparable academic achievement; (2) successfully managed scientific and technical enterprise provides the most useful source of learning, and (3) the process of learning is facilitated by referring to the experience that has proven effective in creating an environ­ ment in which scientific and technical enterprise has flour­ ished.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

1. Introduction

Abstract
Creativity is the most precious asset engineers and scientists bring to the Hi-Tech environment. The nurturing of this asset has made the difference in the long-term competitiveness of nations and enterprises.
Ronald Kay

2. Outline

Abstract
Exploration of the question “Is Management of Creative People Desirable?” — from the point of view of the creative individual and from that of the experienced management professional (Sect. 3.1)-establishes a hypothesis to be challenged and tested by what is to follow. The “Characteristics of a Creative Professional” (Sect. 3.3) identifies some of the unique problems scientists and engineers face in assuming management responsibility (Sect. 3.3).
Ronald Kay

3. Is the Management of Creative People Desirable?

Abstract
This question will be explored from the point of view of the creative person considering management responsibility, and from that of the experienced management professional.
Ronald Kay

4. Managing Your Own Work

Abstract
This topic is motivated by two objectives: Firstly, to identify some generally applicable management issues, of interest to managers and non-managers; secondly, to provide an opportunity to reflect upon our “intuitive” management style.
Ronald Kay

5. Desired Qualifications of Managers

Abstract
How do experienced managers select new managers? Are there general criteria for the selection of managers? In this chapter we shall look at some generally accepted criteria for selecting people for entry-level, mid-level and top-level management.
Ronald Kay

6. Managing a Project

Abstract
The newly appointed manager of a project faces some unique issues: What are they? How does one deal with these issues? Specific attention is given to the expectations of the project members, and to the use of schedules, project-tracking schemes and reports in avoiding some commonly encountered problems.
Ronald Kay

7. Some Aspects of Managing a Department or Small Enterprise

Abstract
The role of an explicit strategy, operating and financial plan is considered. The elements which comprise these plans are discussed, along with their usefulness and value to Hi-Tech organizations.
Ronald Kay

8. Managing Creative People in the Hi-Tech Environment

Abstract
In the preceding chapters, the management of people has appeared as a common thread. At this point we will focus upon some specific aspects of people management, starting with the recruiting of creative people.
Ronald Kay

9. Evaluation of Research and Development

Abstract
Unique to the Hi-Tech environment is the level of technical knowledge managers must bring to the evaluation of R & D projects. What considerations, other than technical, are relevant to ongoing and proposed projects?
Ronald Kay

10. Administrative Skills I — Presentations

Abstract
Making presentations and conducting meetings are among the most important skills of a manager. These skills are equally valuable to the non-manager in the Hi-Tech environment, where a lot of everyday business is conducted in meetings and through presentations.
Ronald Kay

11. Starting a New Enterprise or New Project

Abstract
Creativity in the Hi-Tech world has found no better expression than in the start-up of a new venture. Entrepreneur ship and innovation have been the basis for much of the creative activity we are trying to manage. A look at what it takes to start a Hi-Tech enterprise provides insight into some of the unique aspects of managing creativity.
Ronald Kay

12. Financing Creativity — The Venture Capital Industry

Abstract
What is the unique contribution of the venture capital industry to the management of creativity? What can the would-be-entrepreneur expect from an association with a venture capital firm? What makes venture capital such a significant force in Hi-Tech industry?
Ronald Kay

13. Organizational Culture

Abstract
Throughout this book, it has been maintained that there is no single, best approach to most management problems. This has given rise to occasional ambivalence — a feeling all too familiar to the conscientious manager. In conveying this element of ambivalence, an effort is made to encourage you, the reader, to take issue and recognize the need for personal choice in dealing with management problems. This chapter identifies some of the principles which can help in making the kind of decisions which involve such personal choice.
Ronald Kay

14. What the Behavioral Sciences Have to Offer

Abstract
The objective of this chapter is to motivate further reading and study of this subject. For a person educated in engineering or the natural sciences, this can serve as a rewarding introduction into the social and behavioral sciences because of its immediate relevance to the work environment1.
Ronald Kay

15. Management Training Opportunities for Engineers and Scientists

Abstract
Listed here are examples of the type of opportunities available for part-time or full-time management training and how to select among the courses available.
Ronald Kay

16. Recommended Further Reading

Abstract
Besides the specific material cited in the text, the following recommendations are offered to the reader motivated to further study.
Ronald Kay

Backmatter

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