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Motivation for e-business Project Management Is there a need for a book called 'Managing e-business Projects'? There are thousands of books on project management in general and hundreds on IT project management in par­ ticular. The decisive question is whether or not traditional project management works also for e-business projects. You find different answers to this question - myths about managing e-business projects continue to abound. Some people believe that managing an e-business project does not differ from manag­ ing an IT project. In their opinion e-business can be reduced to technological factors only. They view e-business as the current wave of a technological evolution in IT. As a consequence they propagate the application of traditional IT project management tech­ niques to e-business projects. Other people have a completely different view. They think that e-business projects re­ quire an entirely new project management methodology that is absolutely distinct from what has been done before. The extreme finds its expression in the belief that e-business projects need not be managed at all. Some people view project management for e­ business projects as an unnecessary bureaucratic burden that stifles the creativity of the project staff.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

1. Introduction

Abstract
e–business ― hardly any other topic has received so much attention in the last couple of years. In the mid 1990s the Internet and the associated World Wide Web began a revolution. The number of users with access to the Web had grown to such a level that it was recognized as an attractive market for doing business. In 1997 the Internet start-up era began. Each day new players entered the market, and the ‘dot-corns’ appeared on the scene. The dot-com companies often built their business entirely around an e-business model. During the next two years the technology stock markets listing the 'new-economy' companies rocketed. Shares of companies claiming to be active in the e-business field doubled, tripled, or climbed several thousand per cent or more, generating huge wealth overnight for a few lucky entrepreneurs. In 1999 e-business similarly took off, culminating in a peek in the early part of 2000. It was a time of wild euphoria with unbridled optimism and the belief that e-business would re-write the laws of competition and economics.
Thomas Stoehr

2. Managing the Scope

Abstract
The scope of a project defines the work that has to be performed. When the idea for a project is born, typically defining the project scope is one of the initial activities. Planning and defining the scope of an IT project is usually performed by the company that recognizes the business need for initiating a project. When a project is not conducted in-house, a different company ― usually called the contractor ― for performing the work is sourced, selected, and contracted. Often a request for proposal (RfP) is issued to potential contractors in order to obtain offers for performing the project work. In a traditional IT project the contribution of a potential contractor is limited to evaluate whether the defined project work can be performed and to quote a price for it. From a contractor's point of view managing the project scope is ensuring that the contracted project work is delivered. Normally a work breakdown structure (WBS) is developed to structure and organize the contracted work. A scope change control process ensures that changes of the project scope required during the course of the project are handled properly.
Thomas Stoehr

3. Managing the Schedule

Abstract
Managing the schedule is a core project management discipline — and often it is the most challenging for a project manager. In an e-business project you are normally on a race against time. Making the project schedule is an imperative criterion for project success. Commonly, a project is rated as successful when it is completed in time and on budget with an outcome at a defined level of quality. From these three criteria, quality is the most important one on the long run. However, the first one — completion in time — is more visible. Normally, a project has a fixed deadline. Whether or not this deadline is met can easily be traced by all project stakeholders. You, as the project manager, are ultimately responsible for the project schedule. As a consequence, the decisive test of your capabili­ties and your reputation as project manager is whether you made the schedule. Managing the project schedule is therefore a domain that deserves your special attention.
Thomas Stoehr

4. Managing the Team

Abstract
Managing the project team is one of the most important and most challenging activities for a project manager. If you fail to do a good job in managing the people of the team you will never make your project a success. The people of the team are the heart of the project, and they bring a project to life.
Thomas Stoehr

5. Managing the Cost

Abstract
The main purpose of managing cost is to make a project successful from a financial point of view. A project can be rated as successful in terms of cost if it is completed within an approved budget that contains an acceptable level of profit for a contractor. Managing cost includes the processes required to estimate and to control cost. Cost estimation is a fundamental project management activity, and e-business projects are notoriously difficult to cost estimate. However, a reliable cost estimate is a crucial project planning element.
Thomas Stoehr

6. Managing the Client

Abstract
Managing the Client? You may be surprised about the title of this chapter or even about its existence. You may think “normally the client wants to manage me, and not the other way round”. You are not the only one with this opinion. Some contractor project manag­ers take a passive attitude and look to the client as the one who gives the directives about how to manage a project. This attitude is exactly the root cause of many unsuccessful projects.
Thomas Stoehr

7. Managing Risks

Abstract
Every e-business project is an adventure ― there are almost always events that lead to consequences for a project. Those consequences can be positive or negative for the project. Some events can be controlled or influenced by the project team or yourself. Some events are caused by the project team or yourself. Some events are beyond the control or influence of the project team or yourself.
Thomas Stoehr

8. Managing Technology

Abstract
Although e–business projects are normally more than traditional IT projects, technology still plays an important role. Regardless of the kind of web pages to be developed, or whether the developed solution is for a B2B or a B2C scenario, at the heart of an e-business project is an e-business solution represented by a piece of technology. This technology ― hardware and software ― must be managed [1, 25].
Thomas Stoehr

9. Managing Quality

Abstract
The main purpose of managing quality is to ensure that a project satisfies the needs of its stakeholders. Managing quality covers two quality perspectives: the quality of the management of a project and the quality of the e–business solution developed by a project.
Thomas Stoehr

10. Managing Change

Abstract
In e-business projects there is a high propensity for change. Unforeseen changes will inevitably arise during the course of a project. Nearly all project elements can be subject to change. Changes may occur to requirements, scope, contract, schedule, quality, code, team members, technology, deliverables, and documentations, to name just a few. It is the project manager’s responsibility to deal with all these changes.
Thomas Stoehr

11. Managing the Subcontractor

Abstract
The managing subcontractor domain focuses on the management of the relationship between a contractor and its subcontractors. What is a subcontractor? A subcontractor is a company that prepares one or several project deliverables on behalf of a contractor. The deliverables are used by a contractor to fulfill its project responsibilities against a client. Normally there is neither a direct relationship nor direct contract between a subcontractor and the client for a project. The subcontractor provides pieces of work that have to be performed in order to deliver a project, but the work is performed on behalf of the contractor. The relationship between contractor, subcontractor, and client is outlined in Fig. 31.
Thomas Stoehr

12. Managing Communications

Abstract
Communication is a critical success factor for e-business projects. According to PMI, project managers spent about 90% of their time acquiring and communicating information [32]. In an e-business project you have to communicate throughout the day. You have to spend many hours in meetings with your team, the client, subcontractors (if any), and senior management, to name just a few. You have to inform the stakeholders on project status and progress. You have to send and respond to e-mails and written reports. You give and receive phone calls and you take part in conference calls. You might do a good job in all other management domains, such as motivating the team, delivering good results, making the schedule, but poor communication — especially to the outside stakeholders — can negate all the things you are doing right. If you are not able to convey the right information in a proper form to the right people at the correct point in time, you simply lose.
Thomas Stoehr

13. Managing Documentation

Abstract
Managing documentation is a domain that is often neglected in modern project manage­ment — especially in an e-business environment. Many people view documentation as an unnecessary left-over from brick-and-mortar businesses. From their perspective dealing with documentation — often dismissed as `paper’ — is a waste of time and money and no longer useful in an `e-world’. Taking a look at modern work places and office desks gives a different impression: more paper is produced and used than ever before — the lat­est statistics on paper consumption prove this fact. We are still far from the idea of a ‘pa­perless office’, propagated in the early eighties. Moreover, `paper’ is not the only format for documentation — documentation might come also in electronic format.
Thomas Stoehr

Backmatter

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