Skip to main content
main-content

Über dieses Buch

Maple V Mathematics Programming Guide is the fully updated language and programming reference for Maple V Release 5. It presents a detailed description of Maple V Release 5 - the latest release of the powerful, interactive computer algebra system used worldwide as a tool for problem-solving in mathematics, the sciences, engineering, and education. This manual describes the use of both numeric and symbolic expressions, the data types available, and the programming language statements in Maple. It shows how the system can be extended or customized through user defined routines and gives complete descriptions of the system's user interface and 2D and 3D graphics capabilities.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
As a Maple user, you may fall into any number of categories. You may only have used Maple interactively. You may already have written many of your own programs. Perhaps, even more fundamentally, you may or may not have programmed in another computer language before attempting your first Maple program. Indeed, you may have used Maple for some time without realizing that the same powerful language you regularly use to enter commands is itself a complete programming language.
M. B. Monagan, K. O. Geddes, K. M. Heal, G. Labahn, S. M. Vorkoetter

Chapter 2. Fundamentals

Abstract
By now, you have no doubt written a number of procedures and found that Maple’s programming language greatly extends the range of tasks you can tackle. Chapter 1 introduced a number of simple examples which you hopefully found intuitive and useful as models for creating many more of your own.
M. B. Monagan, K. O. Geddes, K. M. Heal, G. Labahn, S. M. Vorkoetter

Chapter 3. Advanced Programming

Abstract
As you progress in learning the Maple programming language and tackling more challenging projects, you may discover that you would like more detailed information. The topics in this chapter are more advanced than those in previous chapters, and some are difficult to follow without a sound understanding of Maple’s evaluation rules, scoping rules, and other principal concepts.
M. B. Monagan, K. O. Geddes, K. M. Heal, G. Labahn, S. M. Vorkoetter

Chapter 4. The Maple Language

Abstract
This chapter describes the Maple language in detail. The language definition breaks down into four parts: characters, tokens, syntax (how you enter commands), and semantics (the meaning Maple gives to the language). The syntax and semantics are what define a language. Syntax consists of rules to combine words into sentences; syntax is grammar, and is purely mechanical. Semantics is the extra information or meaning that syntax cannot capture, and determines what Maple does when it receives a command.
M. B. Monagan, K. O. Geddes, K. M. Heal, G. Labahn, S. M. Vorkoetter

Chapter 5. Procedures

Abstract
The proc command defines procedures in Maple. This chapter describes the syntax and semantics of the proc command in the same manner as chapter 4 describes the rest of the Maple programming language. This chapter explains the concepts of local and global variables and how Maple passes arguments to procedures. The chapter also provides exercises to help extend your understanding of Maple procedures.
M. B. Monagan, K. O. Geddes, K. M. Heal, G. Labahn, S. M. Vorkoetter

Chapter 6. Debugging Maple Programs

Abstract
A program, whether developed in Maple or any other language, often works incorrectly when first tested due to logic errors in the design or errors introduced during implementation. Many errors can be very subtle and hard to find by experimentation and visual inspection of the program alone. Maple provides a debugger to help you find these errors.
M. B. Monagan, K. O. Geddes, K. M. Heal, G. Labahn, S. M. Vorkoetter

Chapter 7. Numerical Programming in Maple

Abstract
Representing and manipulating expressions in symbolic mode; that is, in terms of variables, functions, and exact constants, is a powerful feature of the Maple system. However, practical scientific computation also demands floating-point calculations which represent quantities by approximate numerical values. Typically, numerical computations are used for one of three reasons.
M. B. Monagan, K. O. Geddes, K. M. Heal, G. Labahn, S. M. Vorkoetter

Chapter 8. Programming with Maple Graphics

Abstract
Maple has a wide range of commands for generating both two- and three-dimensional plots. For mathematical expressions, you can use library procedures, such as plot and plot3d, or one of the many specialized graphics routines found in the plots and plottools packages, the DEtools package (for working with differential equations), and the stats package (for statistical data). The input to these commands is typically one or more Maple formulae, operators, or functions, along with information about domains and possibly ranges. In all cases, the graphic commands allow for the setting of options, specifying such attributes as coloring, shading, or axes style.
M. B. Monagan, K. O. Geddes, K. M. Heal, G. Labahn, S. M. Vorkoetter

Chapter 9. Input and Output

Abstract
Although Maple is primarily a system and language for performing mathematical manipulations, many situations arise where such manipulations require the use of data from outside of Maple, or the production of data in a form suitable for use by other applications. You may also need Maple programs to request input directly from the user and/or present output directly to the user. To meet these needs, Maple provides a comprehensive collection of input and output (I/O) commands. The Maple I/O library is the term which refers to these commands as a group.
M. B. Monagan, K. O. Geddes, K. M. Heal, G. Labahn, S. M. Vorkoetter

Backmatter

Weitere Informationen