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Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Where and How to Study

Abstract
Successful students invariably have well-designed plans and timetables. (They may not have them written down, but almost certainly thay have a plan in their heads.) A plan is an overall view of the course of study and will usually cover a term or a year. A timetable is a more detailed day-to-day division of time and covers not only study but, to some extent, the other activities which are essential to your life.
R. Freeman

Chapter 2. Learning Efficiently

Abstract
If you are going to learn efficiently, you must concentrate your attention on the subject to be studied. Attention is always with us. All the time your brain is receiving ever-changing stimuli — noises, seeing things move, messages from your body (hunger, cold, being uncomfortable, etc.) and you pay attention to each in turn. Normally you only attend to any one stimulus for a few seconds.
R. Freeman

Chapter 3. Reading

Abstract
Have you been reading this course at the same rate as you would read a novel or a page of a daily paper? If so, you have been reading it far too quickly unless you are having a quick preliminary read. You have ignored some of the points made in Chapter 2 on effective methods of study. There are many types of reading, each with its own purpose, each suited to a particular occasion.
R. Freeman

Chapter 4. Other Learning Techniques

Abstract
The primary purpose of notes is to aid memory. Whether the notes are taken from a lecture, a book or a discussion, you can’t hope to permanently retain the whole lecture, book or discussion in your memory. Instead you make notes of the most important items and use the notes for revision and reference. The items selected for inclusion in the notes are sufficient for you to be able to reconstruct the rest of the material.
R. Freeman

Chapter 5. Essay Writing

Abstract
If you can talk clearly and logically and interest your listeners, you should be able to do the same in writing. Writing is just a more permanent form of communicating your ideas. Provided you can really believe this, provided you can feel the truth of it, you should have no difficulty in writing effective essays.
R. Freeman

Chapter 6. Thinking Clearly

Abstract
A daft question? Perhaps it is for a student who has bothered to work through a course on study. But on the whole man prefers not to think clearly. The ability of governments to sustain futile wars such as World War I relies on the fact that subjects prefer slogans to ideas. It is easier to think all foreigners are dirty, ignorant or uncivilised than it is to learn foreign languages and study foreign cultures. It is easier to hold comforting beliefs with no rational basis whatsoever than it is to face the truth about man’s humble position in the ecosystem. So on the whole we are not too keen on clear thought.
R. Freeman

Chapter 7. Revision and Exams

Abstract
Many students regard revision as something they do in the last week or two before their exams. Revision of that kind is simply cramming and is not to be encouraged. It violates the principles of understanding which I dealt with in Chapter 2. Instead of this last-minute cramming, attempting to learn material which has never been properly understood, your revision should be a regular process throughout the course.
R. Freeman

Backmatter

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