Skip to main content
main-content

Über dieses Buch

Using survey data collected from 382 Chinese police officers training in a Chinese police university, this research is the first empirical study to describe Chinese police perceptions of subcultural topics, including the role of crime fighting and community service, cynicism, isolation, solidarity, receptivity to change and traditionalism. This book describes the research method adopted in this study and the findings together with comparisons with Western police cultural studies. In addition, it covers an extensive review of Chinese policing history and evolution of policing strategies, and a review of police subcultural themes and their potential determinants on the basis of Western studies, making it both beneficial and of interest for researchers and practitioners who would like to know more about contemporary policing in China. This book provides readers with insights into a little-investigated area of policing – the perceptions of Chinese frontline police. It also makes it easy to compare the similarities and differences between police perceptions in China and the West.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
During the late 20th century, policing around the world has been subject to substantial change in response to changes in its political, economic, and social contexts, and also in response to changes in the political and social theories of policing in its various jurisdictional contexts.
Zheng Chen

Chapter 2. Theoretical Context: Organisational Culture and Occupational Culture

Abstract
Research about police culture has been driven and theoretically supported by studies of sociologists that aim to comprehend police behaviour through the lens of the organisational culture perspective (Cockcroft in Police culture: Themes and Concepts. Taylor & Francis, London, 2013). Under the organisational culture approach, the cultural factors that influence the way that people think and behave is investigated and interpreted so that the “hidden and complex aspects of life in groups, organisations, and occupations” can be better understood (Schein in Organizational Culture and Leadership. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, p. 9, 2004).
Zheng Chen

Chapter 3. Policing in China

Abstract
The purpose of this chapter is to address the context of this study, Chinese policing. A brief review of Chinese policing, including the history of policing, the police system, police functions, and police strategies, is discussed, followed by a discussion of the relations between community policing and police culture. This demonstrates why it is necessary to investigate police cultural perceptions in China, namely the need in the nationwide transfer toward the philosophy of community policing.
Zheng Chen

Chapter 4. Studies of Police Culture in the West

Abstract
The chapter focuses on the existing studies of police culture. The review begins by considering the historical development of police cultural studies, followed by discussing some core cultural themes summarised by policing scholars; after that, the demographic and work-related variables that have potential influence on police cultural perceptions are reviewed.
Zheng Chen

Chapter 5. Studies of Police Culture in China

Abstract
In China, policing researchers and practitioners began to be interested in studies of police culture in the early 1990s (Zhang 2010a, p. 55). Since then, many scholars have published their views on topics such as enhancing police culture cultivation (Cai and Liu 2011; Guo 2011; Zhang 1993), positive and negative police culture (Lin 2008; Yu 2011), and the relationship between police culture and police image (Ye 2011). However, studies of police culture in China differ significantly from those in Western countries (Zhang 2010a).
Zheng Chen

Chapter 6. Methodology

Abstract
Because few empirical studies have been conducted in the area of police culture in China, this study is exploratory in nature. In this chapter I discuss the research methodology used to measure police subcultural perceptions in China. I first detail and expand on the research questions already introduced, then set out the research design. Then detailed information about the research instrument and sampling is provided. The following parts address how research data were collected with a careful consideration of ethical issues. Finally, the plan for data analysis is explained in detail.
Zheng Chen

Chapter 7. Results

Abstract
In this chapter I describe the statistical analyses used to answer the research questions, and the results found after the analyses. Section 7.1 examines the descriptive characteristics of the sample in regard to their demographic information and the degree of their police subcultural perceptions through descriptive statistics.
Zheng Chen

Chapter 8. Discussion

Abstract
As an occupational group, police officers possess a specific subculture that includes values, norms, and behaviours that are formed through the process of occupational socialisation and shared by police officers. Scholars in the West have long noticed the influence of police subculture on their perceptions and behaviour and have conducted sizable studies to examine the intangible myth. However, policing studies in China is still in a preliminary stage with few empirical studies conducted, let alone police cultural studies. Most studies on police culture in China are characterised by a prescriptive account of idealised cultural norms and regulations that officers ought to abide by or a theoretical analysis of police cultural studies as a discipline.
Zheng Chen

Chapter 9. Conclusion

Abstract
The concept of culture was first discussed by early anthropologists as a human-specific construct that is generated along with human behaviours and provides interpretations for them (Geertz in The Interpretation of Cultures. Basic Books, New York, 1973; Jenks in Culture. Routledge, London, 2005). Sociologists moved forward to suggest that everything in a society that is learned through social life and shared by members of the society should fall into the scope of culture (Chalfant and LaBeff in Understanding people and Social Life: Introduction to sociology. West Pub. Co, St. Paul, 1988). Although culture is not a concept that could be seen as some concrete codes of conduct, nobody could deny that all the members in a society live under the influence of a powerful intangible cultural web.
Zheng Chen

Backmatter

Weitere Informationen

Premium Partner

    Bildnachweise