Skip to main content
main-content

Über dieses Buch

This book presents the main concepts in handling digital images of mixed content, traditionally referenced as mixed raster content (MRC), in two main parts. The first includes introductory chapters covering the scientific and technical background aspects, whereas the second presents a set of research and development approaches to tackle key issues in MRC segmentation, compression and transmission.

The book starts with a review of color theory and the mechanism of color vision in humans. In turn, the second chapter reviews data coding and compression methods so as to set the background and demonstrate the complexity involved in dealing with MRC. Chapter three addresses the segmentation of images through an extensive literature review, which highlights the various approaches used to tackle MRC segmentation.

The second part of the book focuses on the segmentation of color images for optimized compression, including multi-layered decomposition and representation of MRC and the processes that can be employed to optimize the coding rates of those different layers. Rounding out the coverage, the final chapter examines the segmentation of color images for optimized transmission.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Vision and Color Theory

Abstract
Twenty four centuries ago, Plato presented in the history of the prisoners in the cave an analogy to human perception. The outline of his theory is that our perception of the world around us consists merely of reflections of the world within us, as captured by our senses and translated by any synthetic procedure performed inside our brains. This theory seems to be basically undeniable today and could be accepted by most. In modern philosophy, psychology and all sciences that deal with vision and visual perception (in medicine and in robotics or mechanics), this reflection is now a basis for developing new theories and methods upon which to build vision theories, or to develop artificial (machine) vision, or to design algorithms to adapt systems to our visual perception and limitations. Since digital image processing (both segmentation and compression that are of concern in this treatise) is evaluated by the human visual system, it seems reasonable to dedicate a chapter to the introduction of this system and the corresponding color theory.
George Pavlidis

Chapter 2. Data Coding and Image Compression

Abstract
The need for compression of images becomes apparent when one counts the number of bits needed to represent the information content within each image. This Chapter provides an introduction to the realm of data compression and to approaches for image compression.
George Pavlidis

Chapter 3. Segmentation of Digital Images

Abstract
Most of the world’s cultural and scientific heritage is still available in printed form. In the past decades a number of actions and projects targeted the digitization of the printed material and the disclosure of the wealth of this content through Web technologies. One of the obstacles in this distribution is the lack of an efficient method of managing the large volume of data involved in archives of scanned documents. Since, digital image segmentation is identified as of paramount importance in mixed raster content compression, this chapter introduces to the field of segmentation and provides a brief description of known segmentation techniques and their applications.
George Pavlidis

Chapter 4. Compression Optimization

Abstract
This chapter presents results of a study on MRC image compression, in which images are represented by homogeneous information layers. The chapter also includes results of a study on the appropriate methods of filling gaps in the sparse layers of decomposed images, and their final adaptive encoding with typical compression methods. In addition, a comprehensive MRC compression method is presented that uses a layered representation to optimize the compression ratio and the quality of the encoded image.
George Pavlidis

Chapter 5. Transmission Optimization

Abstract
The ever increasing need to transmit multimedia data through high speed communication systems, in which various restrictions and broadcasting policies may apply, paves the way for research targeting new algorithms and new information management procedures even before transmission takes place. Throughout this chapter, the idea of information segmentation into important and complementary permeates the methods developed and described.
George Pavlidis

Backmatter

Weitere Informationen