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Über dieses Buch

This book focuses on sustainable solid waste management in an urban context and gives an example of how a modern city can work with waste management for increased sustainability in close cooperation with the academy. The book describes challenges which the city is facing and presents a case on how these can be tackled based on several research and development projects performed in the City of Malmö over the last decade. In these projects, the city has worked as a test bed for new solutions, developed with and evaluated by the university. The projects and evaluations of the same have been developed with a multi-dimensional approach; including technical aspects, resource efficiency, economic parameters, information strategies towards households and user friendliness. Methods used for evaluation are presented in a comprehensive way together with a discussion on how results from performed evaluations have affected the solid waste management policy making in the city. The book describes a bridging over a commonly noticed gap between research on the one hand and policy making and technical management on the other. Several examples are given on how academy and real life and full-scale developments in the city can have a fruit-full collaboration, where feed-back from evaluation of made changes are used for continuous improvements – at the same time as the actual needs from the city forces the academy to develop new methods for evaluations and develop new solutions to previously un-known or un-addressed problems.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Sustainable Waste Management in a Changing Environment

Abstract
World class waste management is a prerequisite for sustainable urban development. This has been the overarching vision for the development of solid waste management in Malmö over the last decade. The current municipal waste management plan has a deeply holistic view, acknowledging the strong link between sustainable consumption and waste management, and giving decision makers in the municipal waste management organization a strong mandate to prioritize environmentally beneficial alternatives over less costly but more polluting ones.
Anna Bernstad Saraiva Schott, Henrik Aspegren, Mimmi Bissmont, Jes la Cour Jansen

Chapter 2. The City of Malmö as a Case Study

Abstract
Malmö is traditionally known as an industrial city. The main economic activity in the city from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the end of the twentieth century was connected to the harbor and shipping industry. The 138-m tall Kockums crane was the symbol of the city and is used for the construction of more than 75 ships, but the shipbuilding industry entered a deep crisis in late 1970s, resulting in increased unemployment in Malmö and a downturn for the whole city. Many people left the city and the population decreased from 265,000 in 1970 to 224,000 in 1990.
Anna Bernstad Saraiva Schott, Henrik Aspegren, Mimmi Bissmont, Jes la Cour Jansen

Chapter 3. Collaboration with External Partners: Solid Waste Management in Development

Abstract
As discussed above, local waste management in Sweden is influenced by several different factors on both national and supranational level, which during later decades has been striving toward increased sustainability. However, the local authority can chose to be more and less proactive in relation to regulations and demands. In the case of Malmö, the city chose to take a proactive role in finding new solutions for efficient and sustainable urban solid waste management. This work has, in many cases, taken the form of development projects in specific geographical areas and in collaboration with external parties, based on a triple helix model, with participants from the public, academy, and industry/private sectors, in most cases represented by facility owners or waste treatment enterprises.
Anna Bernstad Saraiva Schott, Henrik Aspegren, Mimmi Bissmont, Jes la Cour Jansen

Chapter 4. From Idea to Reality: The City as a Test Bed

Abstract
Little guidance is provided for local actors in their work toward achievement of national environmental objectives related to waste management and the overall goal stated in national waste plans. Thus, there is a need for proactive and innovative measures to be taken at municipal level. In Malmö, different geographical areas of the city have been used as a test bed for innovative waste management strategies. This has provided possibilities for parallel introduction of different technologies, full-scale management systems, and information strategies, and thus comparative evaluations of these.
Anna Bernstad Saraiva Schott, Henrik Aspegren, Mimmi Bissmont, Jes la Cour Jansen

Chapter 5. Collaboration Outcomes

Abstract
One of the aims of the projects presented above has been to introduce and evaluate new technologies for household waste disposal, collection, and further treatment. Several new technologies were introduced at full scale in Malmö. Regardless of the often great knowledge and long experience among technicians in the local waste management authority, there is commonly a lack of time for systematic evaluation. Thus, the external evaluation on the part of the university resulted in the thorough identification of weak spots—both from a strictly technological point of view, and, principally, when technologies were studied from a systems perspective. Thus, the collaboration with the university resulted in the development of these technologies and systems.
Anna Bernstad Saraiva Schott, Henrik Aspegren, Mimmi Bissmont, Jes la Cour Jansen

Chapter 6. New Projects, Building on Previous Experience

Abstract
In the years after the Bo01 project, new developments were made in the Western Harbor area in Malmö (Fig. 6.1). A large development site was also built in the Hyllie area, south of the city center (Fig. 6.2). Much of the experience gathered in relation to solid waste management from previous development areas came to be used in the development of these two sites.
Anna Bernstad Saraiva Schott, Henrik Aspegren, Mimmi Bissmont, Jes la Cour Jansen

Chapter 7. Future Challenges

Abstract
Several steps have been taken toward a more sustainable solid waste management in Malmö over the last few decades. However, several challenges still remain. Some of them are discussed here.
Anna Bernstad Saraiva Schott, Henrik Aspegren, Mimmi Bissmont, Jes la Cour Jansen

Backmatter

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