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Über dieses Buch

The purpose of this book is to present analysis and design principles, procedures and techniques of analog integrated circuits which are to be implemented in MOS (metal oxide semiconductor) technology. MOS technology is becoming dominant in the realization of digital systems, and its use for analog circuits opens new pos­ sibilities for the design of complex mixed analog/digital VLSI (very large scale in­ tegration) chips. Although we are focusing attention in this book principally on circuits and systems which can be implemented in CMOS technology, many con­ siderations and structures are of a general nature and can be adapted to other promising and emerging technologies, namely GaAs (Gallium Arsenide) and BI­ MOS (bipolar MOS, i. e. circuits which combine both bipolar and CMOS devices) technology. Moreover, some of the structures and circuits described in this book can also be useful without integration. In this book we describe two large classes of analog integrated circuits: • switched capacitor (SC) networks, • continuous-time CMOS (unswitched) circuits. SC networks are sampled-data systems in which electric charges are transferred from one point to another at regular discrete intervals of time and thus the signal samples are stored and processed. Other circuits belonging to this class of sampled-data systems are charge transfer devices (CTD) and charge coupled dev­ ices (CCD). In contrast to SC circuits, continuous-time CMOS circuits operate continuously in time. They can be considered as subcircuits or building blocks (e. g.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Fundamentals of Sampled-Data Systems

Abstract
Switched-Capacitor (SC) networks belong to a large class of analog sampled-data systems, and as such they occupy an intermediate position between analog and digital systems. In systems of this type the signals are usually represented by electric charges which are transferred from one part of the system to another at regular intervals and thus processed.
Rolf Unbehauen, Andrzej Cichocki

Chapter 2. MOS Devices for Linear Analog Integrated Circuits

Abstract
Most monolithic integrated circuits can be classified into three large groups: silicon bipolar circuits based on bipolar transistors [1], MOS (metal-oxide-semiconductor) circuits which use MOS field-effect transistors as the basic active elements [1–10] and GaAs (Gallium-Arsenide) circuits employing GaAs transistors [63, 64].*
Rolf Unbehauen, Andrzej Cichocki

Chapter 3. Basic Properties and Systematic Analysis of Switched-Capacitor Networks

Abstract
As we have already mentioned, linear switched-capacitor (SC) networks are composed of capacitors and operational amplifiers interconnected by an array of periodically operating switches. Such networks are very attractive because of their potential for high precision monolithic fabrication of frequency selective devices for telecommunications and electronic equipment applications. MOS SC networks are expected to replace active RC networks and to take over most of the applications which require integrated implementation, although in some cases they can be useful even without integration. The implementation and analysis of SC networks have received increasing attention in recent years. Theoretical analysis of such networks is considerably more difficult than analysis of analog networks. However, most of the methods known from classical analog and digital circuit theory are still applicable to the analysis of SC networks.
Rolf Unbehauen, Andrzej Cichocki

Chapter 4. Basic Building Blocks of Linear SC Networks

Abstract
Switched capacitor techniques take advantage of the excellent properties of MOS capacitors and switches and permit the realization of numerous analog sampled-data MOS circuits. Most SC circuit implementations make use of basic building blocks or cells, which are realized in many different ways. In this chapter we systematically present a diverse set of basic building blocks by separating them into a few major classes. For each circuit we determine realizable transfer functions, as well as the best way to implement them. We concentrate mainly on stray-insensitive and/or parasitic-compensated circuits because of their importance in integrated MOS realizations. We recall that a stray-(parasitic-) insensitive network is defined as a network whose desired transfer functions are not dependent upon the stray capacitances of its elements.
Rolf Unbehauen, Andrzej Cichocki

Chapter 5. Synthesis and Design of SC Filters

Abstract
The widest application of analog sampled-data systems to date is in the area of filtering. An electrical filter is a circuit which performs a frequency-weighted transmission of signals. In other words, a filter enables us to pass the input signals in some specified frequency ranges called pass-bands and to attenuate them in other frequency ranges called stop-bands.
Rolf Unbehauen, Andrzej Cichocki

Chapter 6. Design of Adaptive and Nonlinear Analog CMOS Circuits: Building Block Approach

Abstract
The original motivation for the development of analog MOS circuits was the desire to realize fully integrated linear filters. At present, however, the majority of signal processor systems also contain other functional building blocks apart from linear filters such as comparators, Schmitt triggers, rectifiers, peak detectors, modulators, multipliers, oscillators etc.
Rolf Unbehauen, Andrzej Cichocki

Chapter 7. CMOS Analog-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analog Conversion Systems

Abstract
Analog-to-digital (A/D) converters (ADCs) are used to transform continuous-time (analog) signals (typically voltages) to digital data (numbers) which can then be easily processed, stored, and/or transmitted digitally. Digital-to-analog (D/A) converters (DACs) transform digital numbers to equivalent analog signals. A/D and D/A converters, called data converters, link analog (physical) signals and digital devices and computers.
Rolf Unbehauen, Andrzej Cichocki

Backmatter

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