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Über dieses Buch

High loads with high dynamics in severe conditions can only be driven by fluid power mechanisms. Motion Control is often used as a description in various engineering disciplines to refer to a technological solution that is able to control motion, e.g. the movement of at least one part relative to another. This volume describes how drives, sometimes very large, are designed and realised.

The book gives a practical explanation of the way in which the different mechanisms described work. A distinction is made between rotating and linear drives. In the case of rotating drives, the choice for an electrical drive is becoming more and more prevalent. Linear drives remain important, because of the large forces and highly dynamic behaviour in the domain of hydraulic drive technology. Both these important technologies are extensively discussed in this book, together with design rules and the many installation requirements for applications in the offshore and dredging industry.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Hydraulic energy converters

Abstract
To drive systems, mechanical energy must be delivered to the powered system or machinery. This mechanical energy comes from the primary energy source. For drive technology, the primary power sources are usually electrical energy or combustion engines. Other sources of energy are also possible. Energy can for example be obtained from wind, tidal power, waves or fuel cells. In each case the primary power source needs to be transformed from primary drive mechanism into hydraulic energy and subsequently from hydraulic energy into the desired mechanical energy.
Peter Albers

Chapter 2. Hydraulic energy control, conductive part

Abstract
To get the hydraulic energy generated by the hydraulic pump to the actuator, cylinder or hydraulic motor in a controlled way, more than just pipe work is needed. We call this the conductive part of hydraulic drive system. In this chapter we will discuss the most important basic functions of the functional valves that are applied for this purpose. Detailed information about the valves is available from the often very detailed specification and documentation of the different manufacturers.
Peter Albers

Chapter 3. Conductive part, piping and fluids

Abstract
To get the hydraulic energy from a hydraulic pump to the various actuators a pipe system and of course a fluid is required. In this chapter we deal with the most important characteristics of the pipe system. The characteristics of the hydraulic fluid have such a large effect on the static and dynamic behaviour of the pipework. Because of this, the characteristics of the fluids themselves are also discussed.
Peter Albers

Chapter 4. Fluid conditioners and hydraulic accumulators

Abstract
A hydraulic system does not only consist of pumps, motors, valves and hydraulic piping. This chapter deals with the parts in the hydraulic system that maintain the condition of the hydraulic fluid. A proper design for these sub systems is very important for the lifetime of the hydraulic system.
Peter Albers

Chapter 5. AC induction machines

Abstract
Electrical drives are used to convert electrical energy to mechanical energy. They all use a magnetic field as the medium for energy conversion. As we will see the conversion is reversible, just as it is with hydraulic drive systems.
Peter Albers

Chapter 6. Control technology

Abstract
It is possible that using a hydraulic or an electrical actuator to drive a machine will give a ‘good’ result in many situations. In these cases ‘good’ is a qualitative statement describing situations where the number revolutions per second, the speed, power or torque (or a combination of these values) provide a satisfactory operational result for the chosen drive mechanism. Often no qualitative constraints are stipulated for the accuracy of the speed, output force, torque or dynamic behaviour of the machinery. All these drives are so-called controlled or open-loop drives. There is no feedback mechanism from the main controlled variable. Many users would, initially, rather not have a feedback mechanism because for them it means that the delivery will include extra sensors and a mysterious ‘black box’ with an electronic control mechanism.
Peter Albers

Chapter 7. Linear drives, open-loop

Abstract
In this chapter we will discuss examples of linear drives from the offshore and dredging industries. The examples are limited to the controlled drives, so without feedback of one of the system variables such as position, speed, force etc. Those drives will be discussed extensively in the next chapter.
Peter Albers

Chapter 8. Linear drives, closed loop systems

Abstract
In open loop systems, the value for one of the system variables, like position, speed or force, will be reached by controlling the volume flow or pressure with a proportional valve or a variable pump. The process variable is often measured to give the system operator information over the actual position or value of the variable. This signal is however not used for a real feedback control loop. You might say that the system is being regulated with eye feedback.
Peter Albers

Chapter 9. Heave compensation

Abstract
In the offshore and dredging industries activities are carried out during which machinery that is put overboard comes into contact with the seabed whilst the ships or platforms are moving. For dredgers this could be the suction pipe of a hopper dredger. For offshore installations the examples would include the drilling of a well, installing heavy objects on the seabed, or the laying of pipes with roll and pitch compensated j-lay towers. The movements of the ship resulting from the sea swell and wind waves mean that large variations occur in the forces that are exerted on the suction pipe, the drill pipe, the lifting cable or in the pipelines that are being installed on the seabed. Heave compensation systems are used to compensate, as much as possible, for these movements. A distinction is made between linear and rotating compensation systems. In this chapter we will discuss linear compensation systems.
Peter Albers

Chapter 10. Rotating drives

Abstract
In chapter 3 we discussed the basic design rules and principles of rotating hydraulic drives. In chapter 5 we discussed the general characteristics of rotating electrical drives. In this chapter we will make more specific use of these design rules for the design of a number of specific rotating drives in the offshore and dredging industries. We will also provide some practical information about the final design.
Peter Albers

Chapter 11. Subsea drives

Abstract
Because of the large number of activities in the offshore and dredging industries that take places under water, drives have been developed that function in that environment. In this chapter we will discuss the most important aspects of the hydraulic drives that have been developed for that environment.
Peter Albers

Chapter 12. Safety design rules

Abstract
A machine or system designer always has to take account of design rules. First of all there is the functional specification with which the design has to comply in all circumstances. Then there are, as a rule, several other types of design rules which are dependent on the demands from the client, the country of origin of the producer or the manufacturer.
Peter Albers

Erratum to: Motion Control in Offshore and Dredging

Without Abstract
Peter Albers

Backmatter

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