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Über dieses Buch

The second edition of Multi-Objective Management in Freight Logistics builds upon the first, providing a detailed study of freight transportation systems, with a specific focus on multi-objective modelling. It offers decision-makers methods and tools for implementing multi-objective optimisation models in logistics. The second edition also includes brand-new chapters on green supply chain and hybrid fleet management problems.

After presenting the general framework and multi-objective optimization, the book analyses green logistic focusing on two main aspects: green corridors and network design; next, it studies logistic issues in a maritime terminal and route planning in the context of hazardous material transportation. Finally, heterogeneous fleets distribution and coordination models are discussed.

The book presents problems providing the mathematics, algorithms, implementations, and the related experiments for each problem. It offers a valuable resource for postgraduate students and researchers in transportation, logistics and operations, as well as practitioners working in service systems.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Freight Logistics: An Overview

Abstract
In this chapter, we introduce freight distribution logistics, discussing some statistics about the current scenario and future trends in this area. Basically, it appears that, even though there has been a slight increase in the use of rail and water transportation modes, there is room to obtain a more efficient use of the road mode, mainly not to increase air pollution (fossil-fuel combustion represents about 80% of the factors that jeopardize air quality). In order to be able to reach an equilibrium among different transportation modes, the entire supply chain has to be studied to install the appropriate service capacity and to define effective operational procedures to optimize the system performance.
Massimiliano Caramia, Paolo Dell’Olmo

Chapter 2. Multi-objective Optimization

Abstract
In this chapter, we introduce multi-objective  optimization, and recall some of the most relevant research articles that appeared in the literature related to this topic. The presented state of the art does not have the purpose of being exhaustive; it aims to drive the reader to the main problems and the approaches to solve them.
Massimiliano Caramia, Paolo Dell’Olmo

Chapter 3. Green Supply Chain Management

Abstract
In this chapter, we discuss green practices in supply chain management. First, we analyze green corridors, and then green network design problems. For both these problems, we present mathematical optimization models with two objectives: one related to transportation costs and the other to the protection of the environment. These two objectives are combined in both bi-objective and bi-level optimization programs. Solution techniques are given along with implementation codes and computational results.
Massimiliano Caramia, Paolo Dell’Olmo

Chapter 4. Maritime Freight Logistics

Abstract
In this chapter, we introduce some aspects of freight distribution problems inherent to a maritime terminal, which represents the origin of the road and the rail shipments. This analysis also has the objective of introducing how simulation  tools can be used to set capacity and service level.
Massimiliano Caramia, Paolo Dell’Olmo

Chapter 5. Hazardous Material Transportation Problems

Abstract
In this chapter, we review some significant results in the arena of optimal route planning and risk evaluation of hazardous material transportation.
Massimiliano Caramia, Paolo Dell’Olmo

Chapter 6. Heterogeneous Fleets Distribution Models

Abstract
In this chapter, we introduce heterogeneous fleet delivery systems which are motivated by the availability of new technological devices (i.e., robots and drones), and by the large increase of goods deliveries to consumer locations. Both the growth of e-commerce logistics and the subsequent fragmentation of distribution flows in high density populated areas, call for more sustainable delivery systems able to reduce traffic and air pollution in city centers, where the adoption of medium-large trucks is not the best solution from many points of view. Beyond this general trend, there are a number of scenarios in which it is mandatory to adopt a heterogeneous fleet system. This is the case, for instance, when standard vehicles cannot access an area because of a large and not temporary interruption of the transportation infrastructure, damaged by an earthquake or a severe thunderstorm. For the above reasons, we will focus on (i) fleets with standard vehicles and drones working in tandem in post-disaster scenarios; (ii) truck and drone fleets for delivery of goods, and, (iii) fleets of bicycles or cargo bikes, whose use is growing very fast for deliveries in metropolitan areas.
Massimiliano Caramia, Paolo Dell’Olmo

Backmatter

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