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Über dieses Buch

This book describes the evolution of the community development sector over the past 50 years, and it presents a framework and road map for how community development organizations can advance their mission through strategic partnerships that utilize their core competencies. The authors describe the current community development ecosystem, define a range of essential community development competencies, and demonstrate, through seven case studies, how using comparative advantages built on core competencies can improve outcomes for communities. By recognizing and leading with their competencies and strengths, organizations can bring their specialized areas of expertise to address complex and interconnected community challenges, and effectively meet their missions and objectives.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
Introduction touches on the roots of the community development sector, the need for and growth of this work, and its evolving nature. There are short descriptions of the three types of nonprofit organizations that are the focus of this book: community development corporations (CDCs), regional housing development organizations (RHDOs), and community development financial institutions (CDFIs). Finally, the framework for the book is presented which is: community development organizations should utilize core competencies as comparative advantages to better improve the social, economic, and physical conditions in communities.
Robert O. Zdenek, Dee Walsh

Chapter 2. The Important Work of Community Development

Abstract
In Chap. 1, we describe the evolution of the field and the complex, multi-sector nature of community development work. The chapter reviews the changing economic and social factors which have stressed the condition of America’s communities and altered the support system for the sector which has resulted in the need for a different approach—one that works across sectors and is built collaboration with organizations with complementary competencies. The chapter also lays out the goals for the book, presents key questions for the field, and highlights the content of each of the following chapters.
Robert O. Zdenek, Dee Walsh

Chapter 3. The Background and History of Community Development Organizations

Abstract
This chapter provides a more in-depth description of the major characteristics of the three types of community development organizations discussed in this book and provides a historical overview of the community development field. For each of the organizations featured—CDCs, RHDOs, and CDFIs—we describe program mixture, geographic location, organizational size, organizational capacity, capital structure, and assets. This chapter also describes community development during the last five decades, since the late 1960s from its original comprehensive vision as a key element of the War on Poverty to the present period of comprehensive, multi-sector approaches. The chapter examines how community development work has evolved to an approach where community development organizations partner with many other organizations that have specialized expertise, relationships, and resources.
Robert O. Zdenek, Dee Walsh

Chapter 4. Understanding the Community Development Ecosystem

Abstract
This chapter introduces the theoretical roots of community development. It defines the key concepts and identifies and explores a number of internal and external factors that make strategic partnerships a critical tool for community development in the current and future environment. The chapter provides a description of the community development ecosystem. Some of the major factors that impact today’s environment and the ability of organizations to perform optimally are discussed.
Robert O. Zdenek, Dee Walsh

Chapter 5. Community Development Core Competencies

Abstract
Community development requires myriad competencies to revitalize low-income communities. This chapter explores a number of major community development competencies and builds on Bob Zdenek’s working paper, published by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco in September 2013, titled: “Comparative Advantages: Creating Synergy in Community Development,” which serves as the basis of this book. The discussion of community development competencies is organized around: organizational development and management; community engagement and public policy; planning feasibility; project development; lending; property and asset management; program management; resource development; communication; collaboration and partnering; and performance measurement and performance criteria. Each of the above-listed competency categories has a number of sub-categories that are described in this chapter.
Robert O. Zdenek, Dee Walsh

Chapter 6. Advancing Community Development Through Competencies and Comparative Advantages

Abstract
This chapter provides a framework for assessing community development capacity. The chart identifies the relative strengths and weaknesses of the three community development-type organizations (CDCs, RHDOs, and CDFIs) in reference to each competency. This chapter provides an overview of the evolving field of strategic partnerships and collaboration and what are the core elements for forging effective partnerships and leverage competencies for comparative advantage. The chart is meant to be suggestive and should be adapted to local circumstances.
Robert O. Zdenek, Dee Walsh

Chapter 7. Case Studies of Partnerships Utilizing Comparative Advantages

Abstract
In this chapter, we present case studies that illustrate the concepts presented in this book. They show how core competencies are utilized by organizations as comparative advantages, leading to positive outcomes for community development organizations. The strategic partnership approach demonstrates that each community development organization can bring unique value and impact to the community development process. Case studies are drawn from a variety of community development organizations and geographies.
Robert O. Zdenek, Dee Walsh

Chapter 8. Lessons from the Case Studies

Abstract
Lessons and challenges from the case studies are presented in this chapter, and common themes and patterns are identified. One of the major goals of the analysis of the case studies is to provide practical examples of how organizations can work together with multiple partners, policy makers, and funders to advance strategic partnerships built on core competencies of diverse organizations.
Robert O. Zdenek, Dee Walsh

Chapter 9. The Community Development Ecosystem: The Next Generation

Abstract
This chapter focuses on how core competencies and comparative advantages will help community development organizations thrive in the community development ecosystem of tomorrow. The chapter discusses the results of a survey conducted of CEOs about their current and future strategies. A number of external factors are driving the changes in the community development ecosystem including reduction in public subsidies, restrictive capital markets, shifts in government support, and the entrance of a wide range of new organizations to community development. To succeed in the community development ecosystem, community development organizations will need to act more as a facilitator or “quarterback” (Erickson et al. 2012), expand the target customer/client base and geographic footprint, develop new skills and expertise, and pursue new sources of capital.
Robert O. Zdenek, Dee Walsh

Chapter 10. Implications for Community Development Practice

Abstract
This chapter revisits the questions posed in Chap. 1 to offer a series of observations and examples of the necessity and efficacy of using a comparative advantage framework built on core competencies. It offers a series of observations for community development organizations as well as the community development support system (funders, policy makers, community leaders, and others).
Robert O. Zdenek, Dee Walsh

Chapter 11. Recommendations and Guide Posts for Navigating Community Development

Abstract
This chapter provides a series of tactical recommendations for community development organizations and practitioners.
Robert O. Zdenek, Dee Walsh

Backmatter

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