Skip to main content
main-content

Über dieses Buch

Today’s companies in diverse industries perceive increasing competition and an accelerating pace of change. To cope with these challenges, they need to leverage their current competencies and exploit existing products and services, while simultaneously build new capabilities to develop innovative solutions. Therefore, instead of selecting and maintaining a focus on either efficiency or flexibility, these firms balance resource allocation and become so-called ambidextrous organizations. W. Henning Blarr analyzes this balancing act, requiring the ability to simultaneously pursue both incremental and discontinuous change. He shows that compared to organizations focusing on either exploitative or explorative activities, ambidextrous organizations significantly obtain higher levels of financial performance.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

1. Introduction

Abstract
When companies develop a strategy, they typically analyze environmental and industrial conditions, assess internal strengths and weaknesses, and define a strategic position based on competitive advantage. This process follows an alignment of the value chain according to the selected business model and setting of financial targets as well as budget allocations. For example, if an organization aims to become a dominant player in the mass market, it needs to focus on efficiency (exploitation) and cost reduction based on centralized decision making. If a firm instead aims to excel by constantly harvesting new opportunities and expanding its existing markets, it needs to focus on flexibility (exploration) and product innovation, which require decentralized decision making.
W. Henning Blarr

2. The Concept of Fit

Abstract
Having its roots in the seminal contributions of strategic management research, the “concept of fit” affirms a company’s management options, as there is more than just one best way to manage a firm. Scholars have consequently identified various ways to achieve a competitive advantage by aligning different organizational characteristics. Thus, to properly introduce the concept of fit in a structured way, this section will first explain its foundations and the underlying contingency theory.
W. Henning Blarr

3. Organizational Ambidexterity

Abstract
As early as 1967 Thompson discussed the need for a firm to strive for certainty and flexibility. Despite the fact that Miles and Snoẃs analyzer type, for example, also shows a way to cope with this paradox situation, over the past decades most companies have tended to implement strategies with a clear focus. Nevertheless, due to the weaknesses and criticism of the focused approaches as highlighted in the previous chapter, especially in the early 1990s, scholars more and more switched back to ambidextrous thinking. Moreover, an accelerating pace of change in the markets and increasing global competition created the practical need for different approaches to the existing ones.
W. Henning Blarr

4. Organizational Ambidexterity and Strategic Fit

Abstract
As shown in the previous chapters, both the idea of organizational ambidexterity and the concept of fit share a common goal: to identify factors to achieve a successful organization in the long run. However, looking at the earlier detailed reviews, it seems that they lead to fundamentally different recommendations. As empirical evidence exists for both concepts, this chapter first discusses similarities and differences of both concepts to give a concrete statement on whether they are in fact as contradictory as it would seem. Then, hypotheses are developed to analyze how todaýs firms can achieve a sustainable competitive advantage and thus long-lasting high performance. The chapter ends with a summary of these ideas in a sophisticated research model.
W. Henning Blarr

5. Research Design, Data Generation, and the Research Instrument

Abstract
Chapter six gives an overview of the research design (framework for the collection and analysis of data) and the relevant research methods (technique for the data collection for this study). This paper presents the earliest common research designs and chose the most appropriate ones. Then, the adequate research method and instruments were explained, followed by the operationalization of the variables, introduced in the previous chapter. After the final selection and evaluation of the data sample, this chapter ends with several tests to ensure the validity of data and constructs for the subsequent analysis.
W. Henning Blarr

6. Results

Abstract
While the preceding chapter introduced the selected research design of this study and its resulting methods and instruments, this chapter now analyzes the results of the investigation on organizational ambidexterity and the concept of strategic fit.
W. Henning Blarr

7. Discussion and Implications

Abstract
This final chapter discusses the previously presented findings of the empirical analyses in detail. Then, the limitations of this study follow. The chapter concludes with the dissertatiońs implications for theory and practice.
W. Henning Blarr

Backmatter

Weitere Informationen

Premium Partner

    Bildnachweise