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Über dieses Buch

Contains everything that a project team needs to know about the development and deployment of Web services with the IBM WebSphere product family. Included will be examples for all development artifacts in a format that can be reused in the reader’s project. It combines the authors’ own practical experiences with consolidated information on the latest product capabilities in a unique approach that allows the book to be easily accessible to a broad spectrum of readers. Finding a balance between a euphoric/optimistic and down-to earth/realistic view on the subject, this book will be an essential part of every Web service developer’s bookshelf.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

1. The Business Perspective

Abstract
Mr Evan Gelist, freelance technology evangelist and conference speaker: “Web services enable dynamic e-business and will be deployed everywhere in the near future. They form a new computing model. There have been other distributed computing approaches, but this time it’s serious.”
Olaf Zimmermann, Mark Tomlinson, Stefan Peuser

2. The Training Perspective

Abstract
Mr Ed U. Cate, freelance technology instructor, who is engaged by PremierQuotes Group when it comes to technical staff education: “Web services are entirely based on XML technology. The idea is brilliant; Web services reuse well-established and proven concepts. Everybody that understands XML is already halfway there with learning Web services.”
Olaf Zimmermann, Mark Tomlinson, Stefan Peuser

3. The Architecture Perspective

Abstract
Mr Archibald (Archie) Tekt, J2EE application architect at PremierQuotes Group: “Here we go again, my impression is that, in a nutshell, Web services are the latest reincarnation of distributed programming, client-server computing and remote procedure calls. They merely use Internet technologies this time.
Olaf Zimmermann, Mark Tomlinson, Stefan Peuser

4. The Development Perspective

Abstract
This chapter is designed to help Zippy implement the PremierQuotes mid-office solution we described in the Architecture Perspective and provide some examples of the trickier aspects of Web services programming.
Olaf Zimmermann, Mark Tomlinson, Stefan Peuser

5. The Operational Perspective

Abstract
Mrs Dee Ploiman, head of IT infrastructure group at PremierQuotes Group: “Let me see what they want me to install in my server room this time. I bet application development again looked mainly at the use cases and did not care too much how to deploy and maintain the application or how our server farm is configured. I still remember that persistent HTTP session da-tabase nightmare a couple of years ago. They blamed everybody, but had just forgotten to design their application for a load-balanced environment.
Olaf Zimmermann, Mark Tomlinson, Stefan Peuser

6. The Engagement Perspective

Abstract
In this chapter, which summarizes many of the messages from earlier chapters, we make an attempt to assist Mana, our project manager, to cope with the project management challenges in a Web services development project.
Olaf Zimmermann, Mark Tomlinson, Stefan Peuser

7. The Future Perspective

Abstract
Mr Weery Doubtful, who recently joined the Premier Quotes Group enterprise architecture and methodologies team: “I’m still not convinced. They had to remove their own encoding from the interoperability profile! How about workflow, transactions and service management? More specifications are required here. I’m missing distributed objects and state. To me the entire thing seems like a dead end, just as all the other distributed computing frameworks before. The next wave of specifications will be so thick that no vendor can fully implement it. And even worse, in some areas there are competing specifications.
Olaf Zimmermann, Mark Tomlinson, Stefan Peuser

Backmatter

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