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Über dieses Buch

Written by a leading authority, this book is a comprehensive and definitive guide to advertising that incorporates a vast amount of research and expert opinion. It draws upon the evidence to establish principles that can be applied to achieve successful and effective advertising and evaluates all of the relevant attributes and aspects of this.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Introduction

Abstract
In July 2001, I visited the American Advertising Museum in Portland, Oregon. When visiting museums, I am often excited by the progress they reflect. But after thinking about the exhibits in this museum, I concluded that little progress had been made since the 1960s with respect to persuasive advertising.
J. Scott Armstrong

Types of evidence

Abstract
Casual observation provides the weakest type of evidence. Non-experimental data improves upon casual observation, but it is a poor guide, especially in complex situations. The primary focus in this book is on experimental evidence. The types of evidence are described in this section.
J. Scott Armstrong

Conditions

Abstract
In the late 1800s, John E. Powers, a noted advertiser, recognized the importance of conditions—although he did not specify them. He said an appeal that worked well for one advertiser in a given situation might fail when used by another advertiser. For example, one would not use the same appeal for inexpensive grocery items as for high-priced goods valued for their workmanship. This book provides enough detail about the conditions to permit the reader to apply principles sensibly, whatever the circumstances happen to be.
J. Scott Armstrong

The principles

Abstract
The development of principles is a long-held tradition in advertising. Many great advertisers have shared their wisdom in this way. In 1871, George P. Rowell, the founder of Printer’s Ink, described his “Principles of Advertising,” including such advice as “Honesty is by all odds the very strongest point … in an advertisement.” N. C. Fowler followed with three books on advertising principles; the last one, Fowler’s Publicity (1897), contained over 1,000 pages. While Fowler based his principles on common sense alone, some have endured, such as the value of simplicity, the importance of truth, the need for good taste, and the use of free samples.
J. Scott Armstrong

Creativity

Abstract
The persuasion principles provide only one of the elements in the creative process, albeit an important one. The application of the principles requires much creativity.
J. Scott Armstrong

Evaluating advertisements

Abstract
Develop alternative campaigns, nurture them, and then test them. Many firms do this, especially with TV commercials. Investments in developing TV commercials can be high, and the media costs are also high; therefore, firms should try to ensure that their ads are persuasive.
J. Scott Armstrong

Conclusions

Abstract
Persuasive Advertising is the result of 16 years of gathering and analyzing evidence on persuasiveness in advertising, and presenting it in such a way that it can be useful to others.
J. Scott Armstrong

Backmatter

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