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Über dieses Buch

This book surveys the outstanding work of physical-layer (PHY) security, including the recent achievements of confidentiality and authentication for wireless communication systems by channel identification. A practical approach to building unconditional confidentiality for Wireless Communication security by feedback and error correcting code is introduced and a framework of PHY security based on space time block code (STBC) MIMO system is demonstrated. Also discussed is a scheme which combines cryptographic techniques implemented in the higher layer with the physical layer security approach using redundant antennas of MIMO systems to provide stronger security for wireless networks. The channel responses between communication peers have been explored as a form of fingerprint with spatial and temporal uniqueness. Finally, the book develops a new lightweight method of channel identification for Sybil attack and node clone detection in wireless sensor networks (WSNs).

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction for PHY Security

Abstract
Wireless networks lack a physical boundary due to the broadcasting nature of wireless transmissions. They are open to outside intrusions without the need of physical connections. The wireless security has become a critical concern in the physical layer. Physical-layer (PHY) security techniques, which are based on the Shannon secrecy model [1] are effective in resolving the boundary, efficiency and link reliability issues. In addition, the security in classical cryptography system is based on unproven assumptions regarding the hardness of certain computational tasks. Therefore, systems are insecure if assumptions are wrong or if efficient attacks are developed.
Hong Wen

Chapter 2. Unconditional Security Wireless Communication

Abstract
Wyner, Csiszar and Korner developed the concept of the wiretap channel for wired links. In a wiretap channel, the eavesdropper is assumed to receive messages transmitted by the sender over a channel that is noisier than the legitimate receiver’s channel. Under this condition, it is possible to establish perfectly secure source–destination link without relying on secret keys. Unfortunately, it may often be impossible to guarantee that the adversary’s channel is noisier than the one of the legitimate partner. In a general communication model, it is possible that the received signal of the intended receiver is worse than the received signal of the eavesdropper.
Hong Wen

Chapter 3. MIMO Based Enhancement for Wireless Communication Security

Abstract
Using channel state information (CSI) as the secret key in multiple-inputmultiple-output (MIMO) links is another approach to guarantee low probability of interception (LPI) and realize physical layer (PHY) security techniques. However, the information-theoretic security is an average-information measure. The system can be designed and tuned for a specific level of security e.g., with very high probability a block is secure, but it may not be able to guarantee security with probability 1. The security in classical cryptography system is based on unproven assumptions regarding the hardness of certain computational tasks, therefore, systems are insecure if assumptions are wrong or if efficient attacks are developed. But the classical cryptography system can permit secure with probability 1 under some computing time and resource constraints.
Hong Wen

Chapter 4. Physical Layer Assisted Authentication for Wireless Sensor Networks

Abstract
Real-time wireless broadcast is envisioned to take an important role in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). For example, routing tree construction, network query, software updates, time synchronization, and network management all rely on broadcast. However, due to the nature of wireless communication in sensor networks, attackers can easily inject malicious data or alter the content of legitimate messages during multi hop forwarding. Authentication of the broadcast messages is an effective approach to countermeasure most of the possible attacks, by which the intended receivers can make sure that the received data is originated from the expected source.
Hong Wen

Chapter 5. Detection of Node Clone and Sybil Attack Based on CI Approach

Abstract
A Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) is an interconnected system of a large set of physically small, low cost, low power sensors that provide ubiquitous sensing and computing capabilities. The sensors have the ability to sense the environment in various modalities, process the information, and disseminate data wirelessly. Therefore, if the ability of the WSNs is suitably harnessed, it is envisioned that the WSN can reduce or eliminate the need for human involvement in information gathering in broad civilian or military applications such as national security, health care, environment protection, energy preservation, food safety, traffic management (vehicular ad hoc networking) and so on.
Hong Wen

Backmatter

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