Skip to main content
main-content

Über dieses Buch

In logistics systems, the issue of planning stability has attracted increased attention and interest in recent years. This is mainly due to an increasing integration of planning systems both within and across companies in supply chain management. The propagation of adjustments in planning systems first acquired wide attention when MRP systems were employed as standard planning tools for material coordination. Within a rolling horizon framework the MRP application produced considerable planning instability which origins from uncertainties in the planner's exogenous environment as well as from endogenous sources. This book presents an analytical investigation that gives deep insight into the influence of different kind of inventory control rules on the stability of material planning systems under stochastic demand in a rolling horizon environment.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

1. Introduction

Abstract
In recent years, supply chain management has attracted increased attention and interest in the field of business logistics. For researchers, the optimization of the supply chain is a major task. In practice, different approaches have been developed to establish an efficient supply chain between companies, such as, e.g., Efficient Consumer Response (ECR). Moreover, recent standard Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) packages consider the entire supply chain starting with the suppliers' suppliers and ending with the customers' customers. It is crucial that material and information flows are coordinated in order to achieve the overall efficiency of a supply chain.
Gerald Heisig

2. Material Requirements Planning and Inventory Control

Abstract
This chapter gives an overview of different approaches for material planning in manufacturing systems. The main focus is on the comparison of necessary information for each concept, and the explanation of the coordination between different stages of production. A description of how uncertainty is taken into account in these different concepts is given, and in Section 2.3.1 different planning methods for dealing with uncertainties are explained. Contrary to the decision making concepts introduced in the other subsections1, these planning concepts may also be applied in other decision problems in companies, such as investment decisions, for example.
Gerald Heisig

3. Nervousness in Material Requirements Planning Systems

Abstract
In practice, material planning is usually conducted using MRP systems. Up to now, the use of alternative concepts such as LRP or FiRST is not widespread. Consequently, the analysis of nervousness in MRP systems is the main focus in literature and in the subsequent analysis.
Gerald Heisig

4. Single-Stage Production Systems

Abstract
This chapter analyzes the setup stability of inventory control rules of the (s, S) and (s, nQ) type in a single-stage production and inventory system with stochastic demand. These policies are applied within a rolling horizon schedule framework, and Jensen's concept (as introduced in Section 3.4.1) is used to measure setup stability. Besides examining the influence of external parameters such as the length of the so-called stability horizon1, the weighting of periods within this horizon, the demand uncertainty, or the accuracy of demand forecasts, the main goal of the analysis is to show the impact of lot-sizing parameters on setup stability. Moreover, the comparison of both inventory control rules with respect to setup stability is central to this investigation.
Gerald Heisig

5. Product Recovery Systems

Abstract
This section deals with product recovery management and its relevance for manufacturers of durable products. Product recovery management deals with the management of all used and discarded products, components, and materials for which a producing company is legally, contractually, or otherwise responsible (see, e.g., Thierry [127]). The aim of product recovery management is to regain as much of the economical (and ecological) value of the used or discarded items as is reasonably possible, therefore reducing waste disposal to a minimum.
Gerald Heisig

Conclusions

Abstract
Because of the increasing dynamics and uncertainties in the environment of companies, their planning systems must be able to react to unexpected developments. To cope with uncertainties, the planning system is usually embedded in a framework which permits the incorporation of new information into decision making from one planning period to the next, such as a rolling horizon schedule. The decisions at the top planning level provide input data for subsequent lower planning levels. Therefore, the adjustment of plans for a specific planning level may lead to additional uncertainties at adjoining planning levels. This may lead to a nervous planning system, in particular, since instability at the top level is propagated throughout the entire system. Since material coordination is the central element in the production planning framework, a “stable“ material requirements planning system is important to avoid the negative aspects of nervousness, like increasing costs through, e.g., increased overtime, or inventory. For material requirements planning systems, the problems resulting from frequent plan revisions have been discussed extensively in literature. Different strategies have been suggested for reducing nervousness, and the impact of a wide range of parameters of planning concepts and decision rules on instability has been examined. However, a systematic analytical investigation of nervousness for stochastic lot-sizing rules within a rolling horizon schedule has not yet been provided.
Gerald Heisig

Backmatter

Weitere Informationen