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Über dieses Buch

In foreign policy, the Trump administration has appeared to depart from long-standing norms of international behavior that have underwritten American primacy for decades in a more interdependent and prosperous world. In this book, a diplomat and a historian revisit that perception by examining and reproducing several of their own essays during the past twenty years. The essays reveal that Trump's style exaggerates tendencies towards unilateralism already present in the actions, if not the policies, of previous presidents, and in their neglect of three imperatives: collective security, regional integration, and diplomatic imagination. It is not too late, however, to remedy the problem by learning the lessons of the recent past.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Part I

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. How Did We Get Here?

Abstract
Understanding the post-Cold War era—or whatever people may call it someday—has spawned a cottage industry in the past few decades. Yet surprisingly few of these attempts have grappled with the near disappearance of one of the cardinal principles of the twentieth century: collective security. This book traces that disappearance in time by revisiting several essays written from the mid-1990s to the past few years, and asking how so many of the lessons learned during the twentieth century were nearly forgotten by the first two decades of the twenty-first century.
James E. Goodby, Kenneth Weisbrode

Chapter 2. Global Challenges

Abstract
Globalization has brought about many challenges to governments and electorates throughout the world. This point has been made so many times already that it sounds like a platitude. But many of these challenges remain unmet because the international system—and global governance—have not kept up with the dramatic technological, social, economic, and cultural changes that have taken place since the 1990s. Policymakers have been slow to grapple with them, and to revise the institutions and methods of international cooperation for that purpose.
James E. Goodby, Kenneth Weisbrode

Chapter 3. National Policies

Abstract
The policies of nation-states, including the United States, have evolved piecemeal in reaction to globalization. Some policies have been too timid; others too bold and aggressive. On balance, most have failed to set the right priorities with regard to how problems affect core national interests. In particular, the wars the United States has started and fought in the Middle East have called into question America’s ability to set the right priorities in that region. The failure of U.S. policies toward China and Russia to set in place viable, productive relationships is also notable. Finally, the framing of policy choices as general preferences (unilateral or multilateral, strong or heavy, force or diplomacy) and their politicization, have further alienated Americans and their leaders from the careful, objective matching of means to ends.
James E. Goodby, Kenneth Weisbrode

Part II

Frontmatter

Chapter 4. Regional Problems

Abstract
There are various types of regions and regionalisms, but there are few international or global problems that do not manifest themselves regionally. Regional problems—border and resource disputes, ethnic conflicts, power rivalries, and so on—are endemic to international relations and therefore are among the problems that scholars and practitioners have the most experience in addressing. This chapter pays particular attention to problems in Northeast Asia, the Middle East, and Europe—specifically those relating to North Korea, Afghanistan, Iran, NATO, and Russia—and challenges the tendency to “pivot” from one problem, country, or region to the other.
James E. Goodby, Kenneth Weisbrode

Chapter 5. Regional Solutions

Abstract
When Americans speak of defeating transnational terrorism, deterring Russian aggression, or managing China’s rise, their phrasing reveals not only a certain arrogance but also a geopolitical mindset that sets an image of regional realities in the background, and bilateral or unilateral relations in the foreground, or at the center, with the United States. This chapter advances a different approach, which gives priority to functional cooperation as a means to superseding regional and global conflicts, with rivals, as Jean Monnet used to say, joining one another on the same side of the table and facing their problems together, rather than at cross-purposes.
James E. Goodby, Kenneth Weisbrode

Chapter 6. What Have We Learned?

Abstract
It is often said that victors of the Second World War succeeded in winning the peace in their respective spheres of influence, whereas the victors of the First World War had failed to do the same. The jury is still out on the presumed victors of the Cold War. The world of 2019 is less stable, less predictable, and less orderly than the world of twenty years before; or so it is perceived. In this chapter we suggest several lessons that may be learned from this mismatch between perceptions and realities of American power in the world and reflect on how some of the perceived mistakes of the post-Cold War era may be remedied before a good deal more of America’s power and influence is lost.
James E. Goodby, Kenneth Weisbrode

Backmatter

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