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Über dieses Buch

This book provides senior managers, project- and program managers, team coaches and team leaders with thought and management tools for potentiating self-organization and creating collaborative intelligence in teams. Adapted and expanded from the 2018 Dynamic Collaboration: Strengthening Self-Organization and Collaborative Intelligence in Teams, the book aids readers in establishing team structures optimal for shared leadership, based on the longitudinal adult development of contributors, especially as team members. Drawing from theoretical and empirical research on social-emotional and cognitive development since 1975, the authors create a provocative paradigm of forming, managing, evaluating and linking teams into networks. They introduce an empirically validated team typology and workspace analysis of dialogue spaces called ‘We-Spaces’.

Featuring real world examples and cases of teams that have become self-organizing, this book is a valuable resource for upper and middle level managers, CEOs, Board of Directors as well as consultants, researchers and academics in human resource management, adult development, team building, leadership and organizational management.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

1. Understanding Developmentally Sourced Diversity as a Key to High-Quality Dialogue and Collaborative Intelligence

Abstract
This chapter introduces the structure and content of the book, as well as the central experiences, ideas, and assumptions from which the book evolved. In critically reviewing contemporary management thinking, we show the stark limitations of Tayloristic ideologies, including those in now fashionable, digitally streamlined, forms. To substantiate the calamity of these limitations, we introduce findings from empirical research in adult development which substantiate that the developmental homogeneity of teams is a fiction and that this fiction hides limits of using digital tools. We demonstrate, in contrast, that and how team members’ adult-developmentally differentiated profiles determine the quality of team collaboration. In order to provide alternatives to Tayloristic shortcuts for organizational work arrangements, we introduce a framework for actively boosting dynamic collaboration in teams. At the end of the chapter, we help readers prepare themselves for taking note of, and reviewing, behavioristic misconceptions in five practices: holding quality meetings, developing commitment and ownership, creating coherent collaborative action and common ground, and promoting an organization-wide dialogue about individual development of contributors that amplifies administering “human resources.”
Jan De Visch, Otto Laske

2. Critical Practices Strengthening Autonomy, Developmental Diversity, and Stratification

Abstract
In this chapter, we review empirical research on adults’ social-emotional and cognitive development over the life span that has a direct bearing on management theory, not just the theory of human resources. Specifically, we briefly review “stages” of social-emotional, and “phases” of cognitive, adult development that have found broad consensus in the developmental research community. Together, a contributor’s stage and phase of development are thought to make up his or her developmental profile at a specific point on his or her life journey. In addition, such a profile is shown to anchor a contributor’s frame of reference in the broad sense of “interpretive framework” and “world view.”
On account of this review, the reader is enabled to engage with what we call the three “We-Spaces” or “dialogue-spaces” that together constitute an adult-developmental outline of organizations’ mental architecture: the continuous improvement We-Space, the rethinking value stream We-Space, and the rethinking business model We-Space. We show each of these dialogue-spaces to produce dramatically different team dynamics that directly shape collaborative practice.
Jan De Visch, Otto Laske

3. Shared Intentionality and Coordinated Action in Meetings: How to Improve the Balance of Asking and Telling

Abstract
In this chapter, we focus on the function as well as the pitfalls of meetings. We emphasize that meeting participants are developmentally not cut from the same cloth. They are, in what they do and do not, limited by how they position themselves to others social-emotionally, as well as by the quality of their conceptual grasp of situations and topics of team discussion.
To lay bare the dialogical dynamics of meetings, we integrate findings from adult-developmental research with Tomasello’s research (2014), which conceptualizes collaboration as based on shared intentionality. More specifically, we show that participants carry into meetings what we call their internal workplace—the mental space in which they construct their role identity and its interpretation. We see the internal workplace as the crucible of every meeting, whatever its topic, and discuss a range of meeting practices, suggesting how to improve the quality of dialogue in each of the three We-Spaces.
Jan De Visch, Otto Laske

4. The “Common Ground” Dialogue: Working with Upwardly and Downwardly Divided Teams

Abstract
In this chapter, we introduce the cognitive and social-emotional team cohesion (CSTC) triangle which aids understanding how a team is developmentally constituted in terms of its majority and minority. Adopting a bird’s-eye view of teams in general, we distinguish between two fundamentally different forms of collaboration: one that we call “upwardly,” and the other that we call “downwardly,” divided, where by “divided” we imply “between team majority and minority.” We demonstrate that these two dynamics assume a different form in each of the three We-Spaces we distinguish. Throughout, we offer advice on how to deal with the two contrasting dynamics in each of the three We-Spaces.
Jan De Visch, Otto Laske

5. The Commitment Dialogue: How We Agree on What Needs to Be Done

Abstract
In this chapter, we explore the building blocks of commitment. We see commitment shaped by the way in which individual contributors conceive of their role functioning in real time both emotionally and conceptually, rather than in terms of timeless abstractions as pervasively found in conventional role definitions. We make use of findings from adult-developmental research for recasting roles as co-constructed by role owners’ interpretive process and thus as “made” (mentally constructed) rather than simply “taken.”
In the first section, we show why a conventional role-making model cuts down on the complexity and ensuing ambiguity of role definitions. In the second section, we explore four dialogue practices for exploring work commitments: (1) the dialogue on the framework within which to deliver work, (2) the dialogue on priorities for the sake of transcending the short-term focus on output quality, (3) the group-focused organization of performance feedback aiming for achieving broader role fulfillment, and (4) the role integration dialogue held in terms of the scaled agile framework (SAFe).
Jan De Visch, Otto Laske

6. Coherent Action: Linking Role and Work Contributions to Each Other Through Real-Time Dialogue

Abstract
In this chapter, we look more closely at the dialogical dimension of collaborative action. Specifically, we address the issue of how organizational coherence, even culture, is created through real-time dialogue. For this purpose, we distinguish four configurations of teamwork that give rise to collaborative action in successively more complex forms: coordination, cooperation, co-constructing, and co-modeling.
We point out that, pragmatically, discussions for the sake of achieving collaborative coherence are characterized by asymmetry. By this, we mean that in every team, a downward momentum tends to push destabilization away until only familiar and unambiguous—and thus largely meaninglessly abstract—views of projects and goals remain, while an upward momentum tends to further the development, testing, and supplementation of new ideas. An oscillation toward and away from important focal ideas of a discussion is seen as constituent of how coherent action arises: there is a continuous dance between upward and downward dynamics. Overall, we propose ways to facilitate and enhance those dialogue processes in each of the We-Spaces that create organizational coherence grounded in collaborative action.
Jan De Visch, Otto Laske

7. The Development Dialogue: How to Strengthen Employees’ Capability to Take on Real-World Complexity

Abstract
In this chapter, we develop and demonstrate the notion of “double listening” as a foundation of team collaboration and effective communication in general. We base this notion on empirical studies in adult cognitive development as being geared to transcending formal logic, which has its root in cognitive assessments using Laske’s DTF (Dialectical Thought Form) framework. We formulate hypotheses about how contributors can develop double listening in and among themselves: (1) by becoming aware of their own thinking in real time and (2) by experiencing thinking together with others. In addition, we unfold the novel notion of “critical facilitation” as a form of cognitive coaching, showing that and how it amplifies and strengthens executive coaching in its conventional form.
Jan De Visch, Otto Laske

8. Viewing Human–Machine Interaction from a Developmental Perspective: Stepping Up to the Humane Organization

Abstract
In the last chapter, we scrutinize human–machine interactions from an adult-developmental perspective, for the sake of preparing pragmatic ground for fusing human and algorithmic intelligence while strengthening human freedom. We argue that the reduction of developmentally sourced human capabilities to what fits logic-derived machine notions of efficiency and effectiveness is particularly unwarranted in our time because of the urgent organizational need of integrating algorithmic intelligence into human work delivery. We return to the starting point of this book, of rehabilitating ways of thinking that transcend logic-analytical reductionism and behaviorism, for the sake of instituting a holistic and systemic kind of thinking of a transformational nature that is highly in tune with the apex, in human life, of both social-emotional and cognitive maturity.
In this spirit, we explore alternatives to engineered determinism as a basis of designing artificially intelligent systems that promise enhancing, rather than cutting down on, human flourishing. Our suggestions are based on arguments put forward throughout the book. We summarize these ideas by formulating six principles, all of them focused on the issue of creating opportunities for high-quality team dialogue and, by extension, vertical development of organizational resources beyond the Tayloristic paradigm of human resources.
Jan De Visch, Otto Laske

Backmatter

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