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Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Theory

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
Project Comparison Technique means systematic calculations with empirical data from completed projects. Project Comparison Technique is part of knowledge management in project business and is used until now in three areas: long-time-trends, benchmarking and prognosis on similar projects.
Erwin von Wasielewski

Chapter 2. Breakdown of Project Objective

Abstract
Any project objective usually is composed of various subobjectives that can have different and varying weights. In order to subject a project as a whole to a comparison, its objectives have to be structured in a clear and consistent way, independent of the work breakdown structure [29].
Erwin von Wasielewski

Chapter 3. Partial Comparison

Abstract
For every goal, we do a separate project comparison, the Partial Comparison, thereby determining quantitative values for Difficulty and Keeping of this one goal.
Erwin von Wasielewski

Chapter 4. Introduction to Terminology

Abstract
In previous chapters, we have already introduced several terms. In preparation of chapters to come, we want to compile these and some more terms. We have listed them in mathematical notation for explanations, and in a sometimes different, simpler notation for use in files and spreadsheet programs that will be called the “DP” (data processing) notation and will be used in several of the evaluations shown, for instance. Of course, you might want to customize both notations.
Erwin von Wasielewski

Chapter 5. Total Comparison

Abstract
Now we are going to talk about higher-level characteristics and thus about integrative evaluation of projects, i.e. Total Comparison. Total Comparison means summarizing Difficulty and Keeping from Partial Comparisons for all subobjectives, using weighted means, resulting in a system of characteristics that represents at least the Basic Objective Structure completely.
Erwin von Wasielewski

Chapter 6. Comparison Typology

Abstract
Doing a parametric Partial Comparison, we seek or establish a relationship between one or more influence variables and a target variable. The influences as well as the target can be either initial values or final values. This situation formally gives us four combinations that shall be enumerated by type according to Fig. 6.1.
Erwin von Wasielewski

Chapter 7. Correction for Cost, Price, and Working-Time Index

Abstract
One of the tasks of Project Comparison Technique is comparing projects over long periods of time. Doing this, we have to take into account general changes in costs, prices, and working-times.
Erwin von Wasielewski

Chapter 8. Mathematical Issues of Partial Comparisons

Abstract
The balance function can be determined graphically only in some favorable cases and for single influence variables; usually, we will achieve this end by means of DP programs based on regression analysis.
Erwin von Wasielewski

Application

Frontmatter

Chapter 9. 177 Projects as an Example

Abstract
For the evaluations to follow, the material consists of projects from precision engineering product development for mass-production in the years from 1961 to 1983 at the Munich site of Agfa-Gevaert.
Erwin von Wasielewski

Chapter 10. Collecting, Keeping, and Processing Data

Abstract
In 1969, I was asked to standardize network planning, in 1972, to build and head the central scheduling of the starts of production at the site.
Erwin von Wasielewski

Chapter 11. Total Comparison of all 177 Projects

Abstract
Now we want to look at a Total Comparison of all 177 projects for an example. Various methods of presenting the results to outsiders will mainly follow in the next chapter; first we want to concentrate on goals and parameters, some balance functions, result plots, and statistical issues.
Erwin von Wasielewski

Utilization

Frontmatter

Chapter 12. Presenting Comparison Results

Abstract
Presenting comparison results to outsiders, we have to take into account that persons that are used to handling projects but not project comparisons normally expect more exactness coming from regular detailed planning. They are inclined to overestimate the exactness of project comparison results.
Erwin von Wasielewski

Chapter 13. Application Issues

Abstract
Every type of projects and every branch has its own project parameters. Search for and selection of parameters require expertise and experience from corresponding projects, the more so as some parameters need their own special scale or can be estimated only subjectively.
Erwin von Wasielewski

Chapter 14. Specialized Prognosis Methods for some Base-Goals

Abstract
In the USA, already for several years project data have been collected and prognosis methods of some Base-Goals have been developed, usually called estimation methods. Examples are the parametric methods PRICE, COCOMO, and function point for estimating project costs, duration, and effort.
Erwin von Wasielewski

Chapter 15. A Software Tool for Simple Project Comparisons

Abstract
In 2002, the expert group “Project Comparison Technique” (German: “Projektvergleichstechnik”) of the GPM Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Projektmanagement e.V. published a software tool for simple project comparisons named “COMPAR” on the internet [32, 97].
Erwin von Wasielewski

Chapter 16. Approaching Success Characteristics

Abstract
In Sect. 5.3, we mentioned that aside from calculating Project Goodness, also considering comparisons of actual against planned values, Satisfaction, and other quantities can contribute to project evaluation. To account for this, we have to expand our objective notions by adding binary objectives and quasi-objectives.
Erwin von Wasielewski

Backmatter

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