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Über dieses Buch

“In their comparative analysis of several universities from different parts of the world, the authors make a case for the critical roles that higher education institutions can play in building the civic framework in a society.”—Kyle Farmbry, Professor, School of Public Affairs and Administration, Rutgers University-Newark, United States
“By defining community, discussing how universities are often contested spaces, and covering how universities and students engage their communities, the authors make the case for the future university as one that facilitates civic health.”—William Hatcher, Associate Professor, Augusta University, United States; Co-Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Public Affairs Education
“With a rich variety of historic notions, views, projects, examples and policies, the book inspires to re-think current positioning of students, staff and academic institutions in society.”—Goos Minderman, Professor (Extraordinary), University of Stellenbosch Business School, South Africa
This book adds to a robust dialogue about the role of higher education in society by examining the promotion of civic health through university-community partnerships and the role of intellectual leaders, scientists, philosophers, university administrators and students in shaping whole or parts of the world. Our global society faces significant social and environmental challenges. Professors and whole universities have an obligation to help address these issues; how they do so is subject to social, cultural, and institutional context. With lessons from Americans, British, Estonians, Lithuanians, Russians, South Africans and beyond, the authors describe the state of the practice and provide frameworks through which universities and people working within or in partnership with can affect change in communities and civic lives.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction and Overview

Abstract
In this chapter, the authors present a rationale for the book and outline the remaining chapters and themes contained within.
Thomas Andrew Bryer, Cristian Pliscoff, Ashley Wilt Connors

Chapter 2. Civic Mission of the University

Abstract
Chapter 2 presents a general discussion of how the civic mission of the university has been advanced, theoretically and practically, in different parts of the world. The chapter presents a civic mission at a crossroads and presents a set of typologies: civic versus un-civic university, humaniversity versus impact university, and multiversity versus transversity.
Thomas Andrew Bryer, Cristian Pliscoff, Ashley Wilt Connors

Chapter 3. University-Community Partnerships in the Literature

Abstract
In this chapter, we offer a review of university-community partnership literature, linked mostly to the disciplines we uncovered in our case universities as, essentially, carrying the torch of such partnerships. The literature is drawn from a review of scholarship of teaching and learning (SOTL) journals across disciplines, though limited to English-language journals.
Thomas Andrew Bryer, Cristian Pliscoff, Ashley Wilt Connors

Chapter 4. Introduction of Cases

Abstract
We introduce our case universities in this chapter. Our cases come from different parts of the world, though not exhaustive. We present core attributes of each university, including historical development, size, programmes of study, mission, and other elements important for the discussions that follow.
Thomas Andrew Bryer, Cristian Pliscoff, Ashley Wilt Connors

Chapter 5. Defining Community

Abstract
We examine the variations of how “community” is defined by our case universities in this chapter. Ultimately, we distinguish between two kinds of universities: those we label as having a hard integration with community, which tend towards having a clear notion of communities being served, apart from academic communities, and where there is some level of being embedded; and, those we label as having a soft integration with community, which tend towards having a more loose or variable definition of community and more ad hoc relations with community stakeholders that are driven potentially more by individual interests of academic staff than by institutional directive. We also consider different strategies for engaging with these variably defined communities.
Thomas Andrew Bryer, Cristian Pliscoff, Ashley Wilt Connors

Chapter 6. Autonomy and Willingness to Take Risks

Abstract
We question some factors that might contribute to a university’s and individual’s inclination to engage with civic and community issues in this chapter. Specifically, we examine the kind of autonomy an institution, and professor within the institution, has, and the relationship to institutional or individual willingness to take risks by engaging in certain civic, policy, or political issues. We present a matrix of willingness to take risk based on the level of contestation of the civic, policy, or political issue, and the degree of autonomy held by the institution or individual. Examples from the case universities elucidate the matrix categories.
Thomas Andrew Bryer, Cristian Pliscoff, Ashley Wilt Connors

Chapter 7. Universities as Contested Civic Spaces

Abstract
Whereas we focus on civic risk taking in Chap. 6, including research, teaching, and other activities that might occur off campus or in partnership with community groups, in this chapter, we consider civic action on the university campus itself. Specifically, we consider the geographic space of the university campus as a contested civic space. We examine different ways in which individuals living or working on a university campus might be alternatively empowered or manipulated, or some of both, depending on the political sensitivity of an issue. We outline four strategies potentially employed by university leadership to either allow for or mitigate against certain kinds of participation of professors, staff, and students in civic and political activities: (1) controlled participation, (2) tokenistic participation, (3) symbolic or fake participation, and (4) authentic participation.
Thomas Andrew Bryer, Cristian Pliscoff, Ashley Wilt Connors

Chapter 8. Institutionalisation of and Socialisation to Community-Engaged Practice

Abstract
In this chapter, we consider the formal and informal mechanisms through which civic and community-engaged practice becomes embedded to varying degrees within the fabric of the university. We define four types of civic campuses based on the level of formal institutionalisation of and informal socialisation to the idea and practice of civic and community-engaged work. These four types of campuses are the grassroots civic campus (high socialisation, low institutionalisation), full integrated civic campus (high socialisation and high institutionalisation), ad hoc civic campus (low socialisation and low institutionalisation), and the decoupled civic campus (low socialisation and high institutionalisation).
Thomas Andrew Bryer, Cristian Pliscoff, Ashley Wilt Connors

Chapter 9. Measuring Impact

Abstract
In this chapter, we examine how universities measure the impact of their civic work. We present no typology of practice within the chapter, but we do observe the variability in levels of formal measurement, and the challenges that align with potentially competing university objectives. These challenges are particularly acute in considering the promotion and annual evaluation of professors, given the pressure to succeed in “traditional” metrics of academic success (e.g. peer reviewed publications, grants) while also affording them some opportunity and possibly incentive to engage in “non-traditional” civic or community-engaged work.
Thomas Andrew Bryer, Cristian Pliscoff, Ashley Wilt Connors

Chapter 10. Student Engagement

Abstract
In Chap. 10, we explore ways in which our case universities provide space for students in particular to become active citizens through their university experience, and, potentially, take those lessons into the future when they might be active citizens in their communities, wherever they live. Much emphasis is placed here on the act of student as volunteer, as several universities facilitate volunteerism and provide some institutional framework to support volunteer initiatives.
Thomas Andrew Bryer, Cristian Pliscoff, Ashley Wilt Connors

Chapter 11. Conclusion: Towards the Future of University-Facilitated Civic Health in Global Communities

Abstract
In the conclusion, we define the unique contribution of this book and identify critical themes for future writing and exploration.
Thomas Andrew Bryer, Cristian Pliscoff, Ashley Wilt Connors

Backmatter

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