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Über dieses Buch

This book introduces Radio Frequency Propagation to a broad audience. The author blends theory and practice to bring readers up-to-date in key concepts, underlying principles and practical applications of wireless communications. The presentation is designed to be easily accessible, minimizing mathematics and maximizing visuals.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

1. Introduction to Radio Frequency

Abstract
Objectives:
Trace the history
Show the relationship of light, electricity and magnetism
Present the key concepts and underlying principles of electromagnetic radiation.
Provide the basic understanding of array antenna.
Saleh Faruque

2. Free Space Propagation

Abstract
Electromagnetic waves differ in energy according to their wavelength. Their ability to propagate is also different in different propagation environments. In free space (vacuum) they are characterized by their ability to propagate without obstruction and without atmospheric effects. The path loss under these conditions is said to be free space path loss.
Saleh Faruque

3. Multipath Propagation

Abstract
Multipath propagation is due to reflection, diffraction and scattering of radio waves caused by obstructions along the path of transmission as shown in Fig. 3.1.
Saleh Faruque

4. Empirical Propagation Models

Abstract
The empirical models are based on extensive experimental data and statistical analysis which enable us to compute the received signal level in a given propagation medium. Many commercially available computer aided prediction tools are based on these models.
Saleh Faruque

5. Statistical Analysis in RF Engineering

Abstract
Statistics is the s study of the collection, organization, analysis, interpretation and presentation of data. For Radio Frequency (RF) engineering it involves live air data collection as a function of distance. Since multipath propagation is fuzzy owing to numerous RF barriers, uneven terrain, hills, trees, buildings etc., there is a large variation of received signal Level (RSL) at the receiver.
Saleh Faruque

6. Radio Frequency Coverage: The Cell

Abstract
The FCC (Federal Communications Commission) provides licenses to operate cellular communication systems over given band of frequencies. These bands of frequencies are finite and have to be reused to provide services to other geographic areas. Since a number of different technologies are available, the reuse of frequencies must also differ. Therefore, techniques are needed to support these competing technologies so that they can coexist and offer services to a wide geographic area without interfering each other. In order to provide a comprehensive overview, this chapter begins with the description of cell geometry followed by the concept of cell reuse with the evaluation of carrier to interference ratio (C/I). The classical cell reuse plan is described next, with examples of various frequency plans related to OMNI and Sectorization schemes. The associated channel capacity and C/I performances are also evaluated.
Saleh Faruque

7. Global RF & Co2 Pollution: Transition to Green Cellular Technology

Abstract
Cell phone towers emit radio frequencies (RF) 24 h a day and we absorb them continuously. We also absorb RF from the cell phone when we use it, indicating possible public health issues. These cell phone towers, owned and operated by service providers, use power 24 h a day. Consequently, power for this technology also contributes to global CO2 pollution, which is expected to rise because of current explosion in wireless data. Almost all countries around the globe face this dilemma, giving rise to ever-increasing Global RF & CO2 pollution.
Saleh Faruque
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