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Über dieses Buch

This book reassesses performance legitimacy in the context of statebuilding and identifies the paradox between state institution building and state legitimacy by looking at the interplay between state legitimacy and leaders’ legitimacy The author reviews the significant weaknesses associated with the current measures of state legitimacy and uses this to demonstrate the incompatibility of these measurements with the reality faced by conflict and post-conflict countries. The author uses the Performance Legitimacy Theory of Transition framework to demonstrate the potential legitimacy paths that post-conflict countries can embark on and proposes a new approach for building state legitimacy in post-conflict countries. The author also introduces new indicators to measure performance legitimacy that also reflect its non-exclusive nature. Essential reading for students and researchers of Peace and Conflict Studies and especially of post-conflict development, peacebuilding, statebuilding, intervention, and democracy promotion. Also accessible to policy makers.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Introduction

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Why Such a Fuss About Performance Legitimacy

Abstract
The end of conflict is thought to usher in a new phase in a country’s history. It is often thought of as a critical juncture when new and better processes and systems can be introduced thus allowing the country to embark on a new and more fruitful development path. Establishing or improving the state’s legitimacy is central to post-conflict development and as such, donors, practitioners, and scholars often consider the building of state institutions as the main means through which the state can gain legitimacy. In effect, the suggested post-conflict development process mirrors the following causal pathway: Improving state institutions leads to improved governance, which in turn leads to improved legitimacy and thus development.
Ruby Dagher

A New Way Forward

Frontmatter

Chapter 2. Post-Conflict Legitimacy and the Role of Performance Legitimacy

Abstract
Our current global system places significant emphasis on states. They are expected to represent people and national interests at the international level. As such, the legitimacy of the state is deemed to be of significant importance and substantial resources have been spent on researching and implementing changes that aim to secure this legitimacy. Yet, legitimacy is much more complex than what we think and includes many aspects that are not evident under our current liberal post-conflict development framework.
Ruby Dagher

Chapter 3. Measuring Legitimacy

Abstract
When analyzing how we currently measure and assess legitimacy, we found that the process legitimacy is often conflation with democracy , performance legitimacy is often omitted or its importance is minimized even when it is often the most valued type of legitimacy by the population affected by the conflict, and the differentiation between political support and legitimacy, which serves the Western world well, leads us to miss that performance legitimacy, unlike process legitimacy and international recognition, is not exclusive to the state and plays a crucial role in the undermining of new public management and state institution-building processes when leaders work through or are in control of state institutions. The findings also raise concern regarding how we actually measure legitimacy in non- or weakly-democratic non-Western countries, the reliability of the current legitimacy measures, and the implications on how post-conflict development, especially as it relates to building the legitimacy of the state, is undertaken. To fill the void associated with the measurement of performance legitimacy, new means of measuring performance legitimacy are presented.
Ruby Dagher

The Reassessment of the Experience of Three Countries Through the Performance Legitimacy Lens

Frontmatter

Chapter 4. The Cracks in the Liberal Peacebuilding and Post-conflict Development Model

Abstract
The chapter presents a brief discussion of factors that we currently believe provide an important explanation regarding conflicts, peace processes, and post-conflict development. After a brief summary of the three case studies, it becomes clear that these identified factors ignore or minimize the role of performance legitimacy in conflict and post-conflict phases. Moreover, at least as it relates to a comparative analysis of the three chosen case studies, these factors fail to offer enough of an explanation of the success and failure of these three countries. The chapter also introduces how these countries were chosen and the requirements that were used in the initial case-study process.
Ruby Dagher

Chapter 5. The Lebanese Experience with Performance Legitimacy

Abstract
This chapter is dedicated to understanding the trajectory that Lebanon has been on since as early as the Ottoman period. With the chapter providing a process tracing of Lebanon’s history and experience with a state system, political and religious leaders, a difficult neighborhood, poverty and class struggles, violence and conflict, and state rebuilding processes, the chapter offers a new and alternative explanation of the vicious cycle of state de-legitimization that Lebanon seems to be on. This alternative is based on the assessment of the role of performance legitimacy, a role that has been more valuable than religion and external interferences and a role that the leaders have happily taken on to earn power and stoke religious fear and religion-based violence.
Ruby Dagher

Chapter 6. Important Lessons from Senegal’s Changing Experience with Performance Legitimacy

Abstract
This chapter is dedicated to understanding the trajectory that Senegal has been on since pre-colonial times. As in Chapter 5, the objective was to understand the history of state legitimization in Senegal and the experience that the country had with claims of independence emanating from the Casamance region. By drawing on the role that the leaders played and the important role of performance legitimacy in the war for independence, the chapter offers a new perspective on how a state can guard its performance legitimacy from leaders and how the performance legitimacy of the state can lead to a calming effect on independence claims and how it can offer its population increased stability.
Ruby Dagher

Chapter 7. South Sudan and Its Bloody Experience with Performance Legitimacy

Abstract
This is the third case study chapter. It is devoted to the understanding of the trajectory that the southern part of Sudan and, more recently, South Sudan has been on since pre-colonial times. Tracing this trajectory helps us better appreciate the division or distance between the state and the society. It also helps us better appreciate the reasons behind why communities fend for themselves and why elections or engagement with the state, as in the case of Lebanon, has a different meaning for the South Sudanese than it does for people living in the West.
Ruby Dagher

What Does This All Mean?

Frontmatter

Chapter 8. Performance Legitimacy and the Impact of Contextual Factors

Abstract
This chapter builds on the findings of the previous chapters to provide a very innovative understanding of why countries find themselves on differing state legitimacy-related trajectories. After putting all of these pieces together, it becomes clear that the current framework has little to offer by way of explanation for these countries’ experiences. Moreover, the comparative analysis findings reveal the significant level of importance of performance legitimacy and at least two variables that can play a substantial role in offering the state the ability to earn performance legitimacy and protect it from other actors.
Ruby Dagher

Backmatter

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