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Über dieses Buch

This book studies the relationship between British government and faith groups in its international development agenda within and beyond the context of Brexit. It includes aspects of International Relations, International Development, and Religion and Politics to trace the relationship between the British government and faith groups, showing that the relationship is enhanced on three conditions: (i) the resurgence of religion in international affairs; (ii) the attitudes of politicians and political parties towards the third sector (i.e. voluntary and private sectors); and (iii) the rising prominence of the international development agenda in British politics. The third condition triggers the need to understand this relationship in the wake of Brexit. Thus, the book aims to analyze to what extent the increasing prominence of an international development agenda in British politics explains the relationship between the government and faith groups, and ultimately whether Brexit has increased the prominence of international development agenda and brought faith groups into closer relations with the government.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Introduction, Research Design and Context Setting

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
This chapter provides an introduction to the book with a presentation of the marginalisation of religion in the study of international affairs, the rationale for focusing on the UK and the main arguments of the book. The chapter presents propositions that can explain the relationship between the UK government and faith groups: (i) the resurgence of religion in international politics; (ii) the attitudes of the political parties and politicians towards the third sector; (iii) the increasing prominence of the international development agenda in British politics. The chapter briefly indicates the possible implications of Brexit on the UK’s international development policy. The chapter defines religion from an institutional perspective and conceptualises faith groups into two categories—faith-based organisations (FBOs) and faith communities. This enables systematic analysis of the relationship between the government and each type of faith groups. The chapter presents the methodology and the structure of the book.
Aikande Clement Kwayu

Chapter 2. Faith and Development: A Manifestation of Resurgence of Religion in International Relations

Abstract
This chapter sets out the theoretical framework of the book. It is divided into two major sections. Section one is a review of the literature on the re-emergence of religion in international politics and the ‘faith and development’ agenda. It traces the emergence of scholarly interest in bringing back and analysing religion in the study of international politics. The analysis then narrows to examine the ‘faith and development’ agenda, which is one aspect of the resurgence of religion in international affairs. Scholars and development practitioners are increasingly noting, exploring and learning ways through which faith can be incorporated, systematically, in development policymaking as well as implementation. Section two introduces the theory of new institutionalism, with a particular focus on historical institutionalism. In relation to that, the chapter ends with the presentation of the analytical mechanisms that are used for the analysis in Chapters 36.
Aikande Clement Kwayu

Chapter 3. The UK’s International Development Policies from the End of the Cold War to the Present

Abstract
This chapter maps out the general trends and changes in the UK’s international development policies, from 1929 with a particular focus on the period between 1992 and 2019. The chapter disentangles the various themes in international development that prevailed during different periods of time based on the political party in power from 1992 to 1997; 1997 to 2010; 2010 to 2015; and 2015 to 2019. These themes were political conditionality, partnership, value for money and quantified results, and cross-governmental aid budget spending, respectively. Between 2015 and 2019, there were potential changes depending on various factors, not least Brexit politics, as well as emerging concerns regarding the independent status of Department for International Development (DFID). In the analysis, key factors are taken into consideration including the global context, the political party in power and the interests of sitting politicians. The chapter identifies variations and points of change in order to guide the analysis of causal factors in the empirical chapters.
Aikande Clement Kwayu

Analysis of Religion at the Government Policy Making Level

Frontmatter

Chapter 4. Faith-Based Organisations in the UK’s International Development Policy

Abstract
This chapter examines the relationship between faith-based organisations (FBOs) and the UK government in formulating and implementing international development policies. It traces the engagement through an analytical structure—covering the period from 1992 to 1997; 1997 to 2010; 2010 to 2015; and 2015 to 2019. There was a heightened relationship between government and some of the major FBOs in the period from 1997 to 2010 cemented by funding schemes such as the Programme Partnership Arrangements (PPAs). In the period from 2015, there has been more focus on the private sector and businesses. The cross-governmental approach to spending the aid budget has also affected relations with FBOs. Overall, the analysis found that the UK government interacts with FBOs in the same way as it does with other international development NGOs. The chapter ends by analysing the policy changes using the historical institutionalism framework.
Aikande Clement Kwayu

Chapter 5. Faith Communities in the UK’s International Development Policies

Abstract
This chapter explores the relationship between faith communities and the UK government in relation to international development policies. Faith communities are defined as forums, councils or platforms through which people of a certain faith may engage with government departments. These include the Church of England and the Muslim Council of Britain. This analysis found that most faith communities do not have international development as their primary goal but the government engaged with them, especially in the period from 1997 to 2010. They mainly worked together on awareness raising and campaigning. In 2012, DFID published the Faith Partnership Principles showing appreciation of faith communities and a willingness to engage with them. In the period from 2015 to 2019, the cross-governmental approach to aid budget spending opened doors for faith communities such as the collaboration between the Foreign Office (FCO) and faith communities in securing freedom of religion and worship.
Aikande Clement Kwayu

Chapter 6. Brexit and UK International Development Policy: Implications for the Relationship Between the Government and Faith Groups

Abstract
This chapter analyses the rising salience of the international development agenda within British politics. The findings suggest that the ‘promotion of international development’ became a British/national agenda. By the 2010 election, all major political parties (Labour, Conservatives and Liberal Democrats) promised to reach the UN target of 0.7 per cent of Gross National Income (GNI) for international aid. The chapter examines the election manifestos between 1992 and 2019 for all major political parties, the post Brexit referendum rhetoric and actions in relation to the international development agenda. Regardless of the bi-partisan agreement of the prominence of the international development agenda, differences of approach to aid budget spending are vividly partisan. This includes the level of independence of the department of international development (DFID) in managing the aid budget. The chapter examines and predicts possible implications of Brexit on the international development agenda.
Aikande Clement Kwayu

Chapter 7. Conclusion

Abstract
This chapter presents the conclusions of the book. The chapter starts with a summary of the whole book. This is followed by a discussion of the key findings. Given the book’s multi-disciplinary approach, cross-cutting through three disciplines including International Relations, International Development Studies, and Policy Studies, the chapter explains the books’ contribution to the disciplines. The chapter ends by presenting policy lessons for both governments of donor countries and faith groups.
Aikande Clement Kwayu

Backmatter

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