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Über dieses Buch

This book takes a critical view on corporate practice, governmental action and the general approach to Corporate Social Responsibility. It draws on experience from the Workplace Innovation movement and argues that, as with motherhood and apple pie, it is hard to oppose CSR, with a community of well-meaning people. It is however necessary to challenge the foundations on which it is based.

Many accounts of CSR assume a consistent model of capitalism around the world. It is suggested that capitalism can be given a human face, as companies adopt programmes which go beyond the minimum legal requirements. This builds on traditions of optional corporate philanthropy. However, without changing the underlying working of the company, only cosmetic changes are made. In the author's words: “lipstick is applied to the capitalist pig”.

It can be a mistake to read too much into “Responsible Management”, when the culture of management is designed around irresponsibility. Companies have developed elaborate schemes of outsourcing, in an environment of limited liability. This cannot easily be overcome through gestures. This book seeks to engage readers and to provoke thoughts. It can be angry and polemical, but it points a finger directly at ongoing superficial developments.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
In recent years Business has encountered traumatic difficulties which have raised difficult questions about ethical and moral foundations. Internationally, the prevailing economic system is capitalism, and even those economies which had previously been state socialist now typically claim to be on course for a future which is both democratic and capitalist. However, in many capitalist countries we see a widening gap between rich and poor, and a political environment in which the needs of the poorest citizens are given little priority.
Richard Ennals

Chapter 2. Management: A Social Dimension

Abstract
There has long been a managerialist approach to business and organisations. It has been assumed that a common set of management tools and techniques can be applied regardless of the domain of application. Management has become a field in itself, with domain knowledge relegated to a subordinate role. On this basis, students aspire to careers in “management”, and assume that they do not need to gain initial experience and knowledge of practice. In the UK, agriculture and manufacturing have declined. The focus is now on services, and in particular on financial services.
Richard Ennals

Chapter 3. Lipstick

Abstract
Corporate Social Responsibility can be integral to the DNA of an organisation. Alternatively, it may be only skin deep, added to enhance the appearance.
Richard Ennals

Chapter 4. Working Life

Abstract
Corporate Social Responsibility initiatives address the gap between current practice and what is seen as more appropriate conduct by companies. The theory and practice of CSR is linked to how companies are defined, and the diverse legal contexts in which they operate, which effectively determine the scope for market forces. The employment relationship is at the heart of company operations, as well as of working life, and is undergoing radical change. Globalisation is having a major impact on labour issues, casting new light on human rights, and the role of migrant workers. Companies may choose to exclude labour issues from their model of CSR, but may thus operate outside the law of many countries, and forfeit their credibility. The pressure of international information, and the fear of exposure, can influence corporate practice. If business is to have a “human face”, CSR must address labour issues, including migrant workers and human rights. If sustainable improvement is to be made, new forms of work organisation must be embraced. The way ahead is seen in terms of creating collaborative advantage, both internally and externally.
Richard Ennals

Chapter 5. Cultural Situatedness

Abstract
In a given cultural situation, some responsibilities will be implicit or tacit, rather than explicit. This involves tacit knowledge at the level of organisations and societies. Access to that knowledge is far from easy. For outsiders, it may not be possible. Decisions may be inherently unsound.
Richard Ennals

Chapter 6. Denial

Abstract
In the mythical world of “business”, rational decisions are supposedly made on the basis of considering all of the evidence. Much of this evidence will concern market information, as it is widely assumed that “market forces” will prevail. Real life is more complicated.
Richard Ennals

Chapter 7. Quality as Empowerment

Abstract
We find many advocates of improvements in Quality. We can identify two traditions within the Quality Movement, concerned with Compliance and Empowerment. The two traditions entail different models of responsibility, with implications for Corporate Responsibility and Corporate Social Responsibility.
Richard Ennals

Chapter 8. Workplace Innovation

Abstract
The recent Workplace Innovation movement might usefully be contrasted with the Quality movement.
Richard Ennals

Chapter 9. Responsible Management in Government

Abstract
We earlier used a simple definition of CSR as involving employers “going beyond the minimum” that is required by law. On that basis, the field is defined by legislation and regulations. Beyond what is made explicit in legal terms, there is scope for voluntary initiatives. To the extent that legislation varies around the world, the same will be true of CSR.
Richard Ennals

Chapter 10. Conclusion

Abstract
In the context of globalisation, there are now many distinguishable varieties of capitalism. Liberal Capitalism has had the highest profile in recent years, but it has faced spectacular problems in the wake of the collapse of financial markets, and ongoing recession. It has often been argued that there is no effective alternative, given the apparent failure of state socialism, and the presence of economic problems around the world.
Richard Ennals

Backmatter

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