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1997 | Buch

Retail Power Plays: From Trading to Brand Leadership

verfasst von: Andrew Wileman, Michael Jary

Verlag: Palgrave Macmillan UK

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How can retail brand power be built and maintained? What are the implications of this for 'producer brands' like Coca-Cola? How will retailing look in the twenty-first century? This book sets out strategies and implementation programmes for building strong brands in retailing, to create competitive differentiation and superior financial returns. It begins with an analysis of how retail and 'own label' brands have leap-frogged traditional producer brands. The authors argue that this is changing the consumer goods industry. To meet these new challenges, the book sets out action plans and examines branding strategies in a number of different market sectors. It also uses analysis and case-studies from around the world, particularly the USA, Europe and Japan.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Introduction

Introduction: From Trading to Brand Leadership
Abstract
Great retailers need to be great traders. They need to understand what will sell to their customers, at what price, at what quality, with what service level. They need to be able to deal with their suppliers to get the keenest prices, the best quality product, the most responsive and lowest cost supply chain. They need to be able to react quickly to changes in consumer demand, to competitive activity, to special supplier deals, to changes in supplier economics.
Andrew Wileman, Michael Jary

The Context

Frontmatter
1. The Growth of Retail Power and the Brand-building Challenge
Abstract
Producers, and producer brands, have dominated the consumer goods industry for most of this century. These brand producers are major national and multi-national corporations. Historically, they invested heavily in their brands, in R&D, new products, packaging, production technology, advertising, promotional support, consumer research. They alone understood their product categories and their consumers. They sent out their field salesforces to push their brands into thousands of small, independent mom-and-pop stores. The consumers demanded their product, or they would take their custom to another store. Small- scale retailers had almost no clout in the value chain.
Andrew Wileman, Michael Jary
2. Are Retail Brands Different from Producer Brands?
Abstract
We can see today that strong brands can be established in retailing. Internationally, many examples exist in repertoire and service retailing. The UK gives us examples of strong brands in the grocery sector. Examples in the proximity and category killer sectors are harder to find, but we can point to Boots in the UK and Decathlon in France. Retail brands clearly can become ‘The Real Thing’.
Andrew Wileman, Michael Jary
Backmatter

Brand-building Strategies in Four Sectors

Frontmatter
3. Repertoire Retailing: Fashion and Home Lifestyle
Abstract
Fashion retail brands often look very like producer brands. They can actively use most elements of both segmentation and differentiation in their brand strategies.
Andrew Wileman, Michael Jary
4. Proximity Retailing
Abstract
At the other end of the spectrum from fashion retailing, proximity retailers face the toughest task in attempting to build up strong brands.
Andrew Wileman, Michael Jary
5. Category Killers
Abstract
At first glance, category killers would seem to be the antithesis of retail brand-building: warehouse sheds selling on price, range breadth and volume economics. However, as category killer markets mature and look-alike sheds face each other across the same retail parks, brand differentiation and brand-building will become a top management priority.
Andrew Wileman, Michael Jary
6. Grocery Retailing
Abstract
The grocery sector is at the heart of the debate over the current and potential growth of retail brand power, and on the front-line in the battle with global producer brands for consumer preference and loyalty.
Andrew Wileman, Michael Jary
Backmatter

Managing Retail Brands

Frontmatter
7. Managing Multiplicity: The Detail in Retail
Abstract
In Chapter 2 we argued that one of the primary differences between retail brands and producer brands is the sheer multiplicity of retail brand attributes, and the difficulty that this multiplicity creates for retail brand management. We compared the two dozen or so attributes of the Mars Bar brand with the millions of attributes of the Tesco brand — the customer’s experience of Tesco being a combination of all the products she buys there (range, price, quality, etc.), the shopping environment and the service level. We also observed the very high rate of change in attributes of a retail brand, given line and staff turnover.
Andrew Wileman, Michael Jary
8. Organising for Retail Brand Management
Abstract
In fmcg producer organisations, the Marketing function, and specifically the brand manager, has been and continues to be king or queen. The brand manager drives brand strategy and marketing execution. The sales and production functions, while they work as a team with the brand manager and are equally essential to business results, at the end of the day carry less weight. This organisational structure, with its clear centre of authority, is simple and effective.
Andrew Wileman, Michael Jary
9. Investing in Store Brands
Abstract
One of the key characteristics of brand-building retailers, compared to retail traders, is an investment mentality: a willingness to make consistent, patient investment in building the brand franchise over the long term. This characteristic is what producers argue is lacking in many retailers.
Andrew Wileman, Michael Jary
10. Investing in the Brand-Customer Relationship
Abstract
After investment in quality store brand development, the next most important and effective brand investment a retailer can make is in building the brand-customer relationship. Mass marketing, as with producer brands, can and is used to communicate and position the brand with consumers; but retailers have a greater capacity than producers to use an even more powerful tool, namely the building of direct customer relationships.
Andrew Wileman, Michael Jary
11. Investing in Brand Integrity
Abstract
The title of this chapter may sound rather odd. How can a business invest in brand integrity?
Andrew Wileman, Michael Jary
Backmatter

Different Perspectives

Frontmatter
12. The Financial Services Supermarket
Abstract
In product retailing, the main focus of this book, production and retailing are generally performed by different firms. In the past brand power has resided predominantly with the producer brands, while retailers have competed as cost- efficient distribution channels.
Andrew Wileman, Michael Jary
13. The Producer Perspective: Partnerships and Paranoia
Abstract
The growth of retail brand power, actual and potential, has enormous implications for the strategy and prospects of producer brands. Producers need to recognise the pressures that they will face as a result of the growth of retail brand power, and determine how they will respond to these pressures.
Andrew Wileman, Michael Jary
Backmatter

Looking Forward

Frontmatter
14. Retailing Without Frontiers
Abstract
Retailing has always been considered a business that doesn’t travel well. Many historical efforts at taking retail formats across borders have failed. The number of truly successful international — particularly intercontinental — retailers is still very small. However, the conditions for retail internationalisation are changing, and we believe that retailers can and will become as international as fmcg producers over the next 30 years, albeit with many failures and reversals along the way. Before we give our reasons for that view, we will begin with a brief review of the poor history of retailing efforts at internationalisation.
Andrew Wileman, Michael Jary
15. Multi-business Retailing: Sum and Parts
Abstract
The prospects of the growth of retail brand power, with retailers becoming real brand-builders on an international and ultimately global stage, opens up questions as to the structure of the retail industry over the next several decades. Will we see the emergence of large-scale multi-business conglomerates in retailing, along the lines of Nestle or P&G, running a portfolio of global retail brands with a common brand-building philosophy?
Andrew Wileman, Michael Jary
16. Home Shopping: From Mail Order to the Virtual Mall
Abstract
The growth of interactive home shopping, or ‘IAHS’, will be one of the biggest developments in retailing as we move into the twenty-first century. IAHS will not explode overnight, and will not become the dominant form of retailing for the foreseeable future. Its impact will be limited to certain sectors of product and service retailing. However, it is a threat to traditional, store-based retailing, and it does give retail brand-building an extra impetus and urgency.
Andrew Wileman, Michael Jary
Summary and Conclusion
Abstract
Retailing has become large-scale, concentrated, centralised and sophisticated. Retailers are well down the track of seizing value-chain power. The next major challenge and opportu- nity for retailers is the development of strong retail brands, that generate long-run consumer preference and loyalty and create sustainable differentiation between direct retail com- petitors.
Andrew Wileman, Michael Jary
Backmatter
Backmatter
Metadaten
Titel
Retail Power Plays: From Trading to Brand Leadership
verfasst von
Andrew Wileman
Michael Jary
Copyright-Jahr
1997
Verlag
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Electronic ISBN
978-1-349-14378-8
Print ISBN
978-1-349-14380-1
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-349-14378-8