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This book introduces a new methodology to assess the way in which journalists today operate within a new sphere of communicative ‘public’ interdependence across global digital communities by focusing on climate change debates. The authors propose a framework of ‘cosmopolitan loops,’ which addresses three major transformations in journalistic practice: the availability of ‘fluid’ webs of data which situate journalistic practice in a transnational arena; the increased involvement of journalists from developing countries in a transnationally interdependent sphere; and the increased awareness of a larger interconnected globalized ‘risk’ dimension of even local issues which shapes a new sphere of news ‘horizons.’ The authors draw on interviews with journalists to demonstrate that the construction of climate change ‘issues’ is increasingly situated in an emerging dimension of journalistic interconnectivity with climate actors across local, global and digital arenas and through physical and digital spaces of flows.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
Over the past years, the transnational debate of climate change has shifted. While only two decades ago, the climate change was seen as a future risk of melting polar glacier caps, rising sea levels of oceans and the implications of CO2 emissions on the environment, and these processes of planetary destruction are today significant—climate change has become not only a reality but also a catastrophe which requires urgent policy approaches to minimize further implications on a global scale.
Ingrid Volkmer, Kasim Sharif

Chapter 2. Risk Journalism—In Contexts of Trans-societal Interdependence

Abstract
The term ‘climate change’ refers to a variation in the earth’s temperature, and global climate policy aims to negotiate the urgent need to restrict the process of planetary warming. While climate change can be caused by natural processes such as solar radiation, mountain building or continental drifts, the term mostly refers to ‘anthropogenic climate change’, caused by human industrial activities which are drastically changing all types of natural environmental patterns.
Ingrid Volkmer, Kasim Sharif

Chapter 3. Towards Cosmopolitan Relational ‘Scales’ of Actoral Interconnectivity

Abstract
The previous chapter addressed the dimensions of climate change as a globalized risk (Beck in World at risk, Polity Press, Cambridge, 2009), and it is argued that a globalized perspective requires a transnational methodological framework for assessing the new dimensions of interdependent risk journalism.
Ingrid Volkmer, Kasim Sharif

Chapter 4. Pakistan, a Glocalized Context for Global Media Climate Change Research

Abstract
Diverting from the traditional dichotomy of national versus transnational media, from a focus on the nation state towards actoral connectivity across societies and from a methodological research dichotomy of ‘linear’ vs networked media (e.g. Cottle in Environmental conflict and the media. Peter Lang, Oxford, pp. 13–28, 2013), this study concentrates on a less investigated South Asian country, Pakistan. Pakistan—even though being a low-income country and being continuously challenged by all kind of crises—cannot ‘only’ be reduced to these economical or conflict strata but we need to begin to assess developing regions in a new perspective.
Ingrid Volkmer, Kasim Sharif

Chapter 5. Methodology

Abstract
The last two decades witnessed the growth of media scholarship about climate change. The major foci of media and climate change research have been the representation of climate change across different media outlets in different contexts and the implications the public agenda, pressure groups, policymakers and scientific experts.
Ingrid Volkmer, Kasim Sharif

Chapter 6. Cosmopolitanized Scales of Climate Change Communication: Arenas, Actors and Communicative Spaces

Abstract
As discussed in Chapter 2, climate change is a globalized ‘risk’ (Beck in The risk society: Towards a new modernity. Sage, London and Thousand Oaks, CA, 1992) as it is caused by globalized interconnectivity—an outcome of industrialization and reflexive modernization (Beck 2003). However, research in social sciences and media and communication (Smith and Lindenfeld in Environmental Communication 8:179–196, 2014; Schäfer and Schlichting Environmental Communication 8:142–160, 2014) conceptualizes this globalized risk—its production, construction, communication, conflicting claims, policy measures, adaptation and mitigation plans—mainly within national frameworks. Research that develops insights into new formations of ‘interconnectivity’ that shape discourses around the globalized risk of climate change is rare.
Ingrid Volkmer, Kasim Sharif

Chapter 7. The Construction of Cosmopolitanized News of Climate Change at the Micro-scale: Representation, Production and Communication

Abstract
The previous chapter constructed the ‘macro-scale’ of cosmopolitan spheres of climate change communication across three parameter: arenas, actors and communicative spaces. In this chapter, we take this discussion further by examining the ‘micro-scale’. The term ‘micro-scale’ focuses specifically on the ‘logic’ of producing local news in the ‘loco-digital’ arena. In contrast to traditional approaches that distinguish between ‘digital’ and ‘non-digital’, this approach incorporates the reflexivity of digital engagement and local perceptions and identifies the loco-digital arena as a localized, yet transnationally connected discursive sphere.
Ingrid Volkmer, Kasim Sharif

Chapter 8. Cosmopolitan Relational Loops of Interconnectivity

Abstract
Climate change can no longer be considered as just an ‘issue’ but it is today an increasingly politicized globally interdependent crisis. Within this spectrum, climate change journalism—or, we argue, ‘risk journalism’—has new responsibilities to communicate the interdependence of globalized crisis dimensions within a world community.
Ingrid Volkmer, Kasim Sharif

Backmatter

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