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Über dieses Buch

The absence of a book dealing with rubber processing has been apparent for some time and it is surprising that a straightforward text has not been produced. However, this book goes far beyond the scope of a simple technical approach and deals with the full spectrum of activities which lead to successful and profitable product manufacture. The need to deliver a product to a customer at the right time, at the right cost, and at the right quality is a basic premise on which the book is based. The increasingly stringent demands of customers for products that can be introduced directly into an assembly or production line without goods­ inwards inspection, are placing increasing pressures on the manufacturer. As a result, it is becoming essential to achieve and sustain product quality and consistency, by the monitoring and control of manufacture, at a level which renders all products saleable. The book has been written to satisfy the needs of practitioners in the rubber industry and is certainly not another descriptive text which is only read for interest when more important matters are not pressing. My close cooperation with Philip K. Freakley during the writing of the book has resulted in the incorporation of many of the viewpoints and methods which I have developed and refined during more than 38 years in the rubber industry.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

1. Rubber Product Manufacturing Systems

Abstract
The manufacturing technology of the rubber industry is based on a number of key processes and operations, some of which have undergone a continuous evolution since the founding of the first rubber companies. These processes and operations form the building blocks from which a complex and diverse range of manufacturing systems are assembled. For conventional vulcanized rubber products, on which this book concentrates, a sequence of processes and operations is necessary to complete manufacture. It is possible to draw complex generalized flowcharts for the manufacture of typical products, but in the majority of cases these flowcharts can be reduced to three fundamental stages:
Philip K. Freakley

2. Materials Behavior and Testing

Abstract
The “processability” of a rubber mix depends on three main aspects of materials behavior:
1.
The flow properties.
 
2.
The thermal or heat-transfer properties.
 
3.
The vulcanization characteristics.
 
Philip K. Freakley

3. Principles of Mixing and Internal Mixers

Abstract
Mixing, being the first step in a sequence of operations, determines the efficiency with which subsequent processes may be carried out and exerts a considerable influence on product performance. Adequate and consistent mixing is a prerequisite for successful manufacture.
Philip K. Freakley

4. Screw Extrusion and Continuous Mixing

Abstract
Extruders are widely used in the rubber industry in a variety of applications. In large mixing systems, dump extruders are used to accept the batch of material from an internal mixer and to give it a shape suitable for further operations. Again in the mixing system, mixing extruders or continuous mixers are used to incorporate and distribute particulate additives. Further down the production line, extruders are used to preform rubber for further operations and to form finished products. All these applications generate their own machine performance requirements, and the wide range of extruder designs available reflects this.
Philip K. Freakley

5. Calendering and Milling

Abstract
Calendering and milling are sufficiently similar to enable them to be treated together. Both have been used for many years in the rubber industry, resulting in a considerable fund of practical expertise for their operation. However, technical studies of both the two-roll mill and calender yield information which can be put to practical use in any company.
Philip K. Freakley

6. Heat Transfer and Vulcanization Methods

Abstract
Vulcanization processes divide naturally into two main groups. The first consists of molding methods, all of which involve an integral shaping operation which is completed prior to the onset of cross-linking. The second includes a number of techniques used to cure a previously formed product. For the purposes of analysis, the shaping operations in molding can be considered to be separate from the vulcanization stage, enabling the majority of vulcanization processes to be evaluated using similar techniques.
Philip K. Freakley

7. Process Control and Quality Control

Abstract
Quality control has traditionally been concerned with the setting of standards which must be maintained at each stage of manufacture, followed by the manual monitoring of process supplies, operations, and products, to check if the specified standards are being maintained. In contrast, process control has been almost entirely concerned with the design and performance of systems for maintaining machine conditions and controlling machine operations. However, both quality control and process control have the common objective of enabling products which are acceptable to the customer to be produced at a cost which ensures both a competitive price and a viable profit margin.
Philip K. Freakley

8. Plant Layout and Operations Methods

Without Abstract
Philip K. Freakley

9. Company Philosophy, Organization, and Strategy

Abstract
The formulation and progressive evolution of a coherent company philosophy underpins all of a company’s activities. It is responsible for the attitude which employees are encouraged to adopt towards the manufacture of the company’s products and towards customers, suppliers, and each other. For a philosophy to be credible, a company’s activities must be seen to be derived consistently from it. In its most basic form a company philosophy is a positive statement of the approach adopted towards the challenge of staying in business.
Philip K. Freakley

10. The Economics of Manufacturing Operations

Abstract
Cash flow management is concerned with controlling the financial resources of a company and thus underpins many of the techniques by which performance is assessed. It is therefore necessary to deal first with cash flow, so that the function and value of the methods of monitoring and controlling the detailed aspects of company performance which follow can be recognized clearly.
Philip K. Freakley

11. Production Management

Without Abstract
Philip K. Freakley

Backmatter

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