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Über dieses Buch

This book reviews the authenticity of certain Street Food specialties from the viewpoint of food chemists. At present, the food market clearly shows the predominance of fast-food operators in many Western countries. However, the concomitant presence of the traditional lifestyle model known as the Mediterranean Diet in Europe has also been increasingly adopted in many countries, in some cases with unforeseen effects such as offering Mediterranean-like foods for out-of-home consumption. This commercial strategy also includes the so-called Street Food, which is marketed as a variation on Mediterranean foods. One of the best known versions of Street Food products can be found in Sicily, Italy, and particularly in its largest city, Palermo. Because of certain authenticity issues, the Italian National Council of Research Chemists has issued four procedural guidelines for various Palermo specialties with the aim of attaining the traditional specialty guaranteed status in accordance with European Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012. The first chapter of the book provides a brief introduction to the general concept of Street Foods. The remaining four chapters describe four food specialties – Arancina, Sfincionello, Pane ca meusa, and Pane e panelle – typically produced in Palermo, with particular reference to their chemical composition, identification of raw materials from a chemical viewpoint, permissible cooking and preparation procedures (with chemical explanations), preservation, and storage. The book offers a unique guide to Street Food authenticity, and can also serve as a reference work for other traditional/historical products.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. The Street Food Culture in Europe

Abstract
At present, the food market shows apparently the prevailing position of fast-food operators in many Western Countries. However, the concomitant presence of the traditional lifestyle model known as the ‘Mediterranean Diet’ in Europe should not be excluded. The fragmentation of the current market of foods and beverages––sometimes discussed in terms of ‘Food Wars’––involves many possible products and lifestyles, including vegan foods, religion-based diets, ‘healthy’ or fast-weight loss diets, organic foods, Mediterranean Diet… and also the so-called ‘Street Foods’. These products are diffused as a cultural heritage in all known urbanised areas of the world, suggesting relationships with social aggregation, economic convenience, typical folk elements, etc. The study of street foods can help when speaking of the examination of several historical products of Sicily, Italy, and particularly of the largest Sicilian city, Palermo.
Michele Barone, Alessandra Pellerito

Chapter 2. Palermo’s Street Foods. The Authentic Arancina

Abstract
Street food is synonym of historical dominations and business methods at least: this discussion should concern non-technical disciplines such as history, architectural design, marketing, and other ambits with relation to chemistry, microbiology, hygiene, and technological features of foods and beverages. More than two billion consumers worldwide prefer street foods. It may be assumed in certain ambits and social areas that the consumption of street foods is associated with a social elevation in terms of cultural defense of traditions, the spreading of different versions worldwide, and the consequent cultural ‘contamination’, with some exceptions. Sicily is a geographically limited area in the Mediterranean Basin. Its history has a long number of cultural contaminations, and several Sicilian ‘street foods’ appear to be a localised characteristic, so that the typical Palermo inhabitants consider these specialities as the pride of the area and the demonstration of cultural identity. For this reason, the book has been also named ‘the Palermo case study’. The present Chapter concerns one of these specialities, the ‘arancina’, and the alternative Sicilian version—the Catania’s or Western side ‘arancino’—by different viewpoints including history, possible ‘authenticity’ features, identification of raw materials, preparation procedures, concomitant alternative recipes, and nutrition facts.
Michele Barone, Alessandra Pellerito

Chapter 3. Palermo’s Street Foods. The Authentic Sfincionello

Abstract
The so-called ‘Street Food’ is often claimed to represent a different version of the edible product in the Mediterranean Basin, in the same area of the ‘Mediterranean Diet’. This style is perceived and claimed to be a synonym of ‘safe’, ‘healthy’, and ‘hygienic’ food eating behaviour. Actually, related foods are mainly considered ‘safe’ because of their composition and the presence of antioxidants. On the other side, ‘street food’ concerns only ready-to-eat foods and beverages which are prepared and sold literally in city and town streets and in similar places (including also small food trucks). This feature is observed worldwide (United Kingdom, United States of America, etc.) and can be studied in Italy, and especially in Sicily, where cheapness and other reasons have to be considered. The prominence of fried street foods in Sicily should be considered as a peculiar heritage of ancient civilisations, including arancina/arancino types and pizza (or focaccia)-like products. The present Chapter concerns one of the most known street food specialities in the Palermo area: the ‘sfincionello’ product—with some digression concerning similar foods—by different viewpoints including history, possible ‘authenticity’ features, identification of raw materials, preparation procedures, concomitant alternative recipes, and nutrition facts.
Michele Barone, Alessandra Pellerito

Chapter 4. Palermo’s Street Foods. The Authentic Pani câ Meusa

Abstract
Street food is not a synonym of Mediterranean-Diet-related foods. An internationally recognised definition of street foods clearly identifies these products as ready-to-eat foods and beverages which are prepared and sold by different food business operators without an immobile location. Related features—including cheapness and nutritional contents—do not seem applicable to the Mediterranean Diet. Certain well-known Sicilian specialities, such as arancina, arancino, or sfincionello, are identified as street foods without connections between their presumptive safety/health and the current status of food produced and sold ‘on the road’. On the contrary, these foods are recognised as excellent ‘one-food’ solutions being able to supply the needed energy and many nutritional factors at the same time. In this ambit, the study of street foods in the world could show some surprise, especially with reference to particular social and geographical/historical areas. This Chapter concerns a specific street food which can be found only in Palermo, Sicily, although some similar recipe may be found in Southern Italy. Because of the important influence of many civilisations in Sicily and the pre-existing Hebraic traditions, the study of a peculiar Palermo’s sandwich—the pani câ meusa street food—is highly recommended by different viewpoints including history, possible ‘authenticity’ features, and identification of raw materials, preparation procedures, concomitant alternative recipes, and nutritional facts.
Michele Barone, Alessandra Pellerito

Chapter 5. Palermo’s Street Foods. The Authentic Pane e Panelle

Abstract
‘Street foods’ are generally correlated with social aggregation, urbanisation, cheapness, and nutritional contents at the same time. In particular, the following conditions: economic convenience; lack of immobile locations; ‘poor’ food features; typical folk elements; and a certain trend towards poor hygienic conditions; are or should be taken into account. Above all, street foods are extremely preferred in certain areas because of their amount of bioavailable proteins and energy intake, and also because of their economic convenience. The higher the price, the higher the inherent value of the food. In this ambit, the study of street foods in the world could show some surprise. This book is dedicated to the study of a peculiar type of folk cuisine found in the Sicilian largest city, Palermo. In particular, this Chapter concerns a specific product which can be found only in Palermo, although some similar recipe may be found in Northern Italy (Liguria Region). Because of the important influence of many civilisations in Sicily, these situations may be expected. One or two of these products are explicitly found in Palermo, and one of these foods––the pane e panelle sandwich—is discussed in this Chapter by different viewpoints including history, possible ‘authenticity’ features, the identification of raw materials, preparation procedures, concomitant alternative recipes, and nutritional facts.
Michele Barone, Alessandra Pellerito
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