Skip to main content

Tipp

Weitere Kapitel dieses Buchs durch Wischen aufrufen

2016 | OriginalPaper | Buchkapitel

3. Silicon Valley: A Cradle of Management Innovation

verfasst von : Annika Steiber, Sverker Alänge

Erschienen in: The Silicon Valley Model

Verlag: Springer International Publishing

share
TEILEN

Abstract

Here we take a fresh look at Silicon Valley, exploring it as a hub of management innovation, not just new technology. The chapter focuses on the management of large and growing firms as opposed to startups. We see that new ways of managing have emerged in the Valley due to two main influences: the region’s leadership in information technologies—which both demand and enable rapid change—and the entrepreneurial culture of the region. The chapter also describes the high degrees of networking and collaboration in Silicon Valley, along with the companies’ intense “people focus,” which entails recruiting and managing entrepreneurial employees. A brief history of the Bay Area shows how new management approaches grew from new thinking that emerged over many years, from the California Gold Rush through the birth of Stanford University and the early electronics industry, to the modern growth of Silicon Valley.
Fußnoten
1
All of this will be documented with evidence and stories from expert sources including Homa Bahrami, Annalee Saxenian, Timothy Sturgeon and others.
 
2
See “The Real Legacy of the Sixties,” pp. 202–207, in Florida (2002).
 
3
Freeman et al. (1982), p. 217.
 
4
Excerpt from a speech by Bill Joy at the Churchill Club, Palo Alto, in 1990. Cited in sources such as Bahrami (1992), p. 6.
 
5
See Sturgeon’s chapter “How Silicon Valley Came to Be” in Kenney, ed. (2000), pp. 15–47. Sturgeon and Kenney, in turn, credit Norberg (1976).
 
6
For a concise summary of Intel’s rebound see Saxenian (1990).
 
7
Saxenian (1994).
 
8
 
9
Bahrami (1992).
 
10
Ibid, p. 38.
 
11
Ibid, p. 39.
 
12
Ibid, p. 34.
 
13
Bahrami and Evans (2005), p. 55.
 
14
There are varying estimates of the Native American population of California pre- and post-contact with Europeans, but most sources agree with the total range cited here for the years leading up to the Gold Rush. See for example PBS (2006).
 
15
Ibid and many other sources; see for example Starr (1973), pp. 69, 110–139 and elsewhere.
 
17
Levi Strauss & Co (2014).
 
18
For a concise account of the founding of Stanford University, see History of Stanford at https://​www.​stanford.​edu/​about/​history/​. Accessed 26 June 2015. For a detailed biography of Leland Stanford and his activities, see Tutorow (2004).
 
19
The following discussion is all from Timothy Sturgeon’s chapter in Kenney, ed. (2002), pp. 15–47.
 
20
Saxenian (1990).
 
21
Ibid, p. 103. (The Apple purchasing director quoted in this passage was Jim Bilodeau.)
 
22
Ibid, p. 91.
 
23
Rogers and Larsen (1984), p. 80.
 
25
Steiber and Alänge (2013).
 
26
There are many accounts of the history of William Shockley and his company; see for example Shurkin (2006). Likewise many sources have told the stories of the so-called “traitorous eight” defectors from Shockley, who founded Fairchild Semiconductor, which then had important spinout firms. For a “family tree” chart of companies descended from Fairchild, see Business Week (1997).
 
27
See for example Matthews (2002), pp. 147–180 and elsewhere.
 
28
Florida (2002), pp. 88–91, 99.
 
29
Ibid.
 
31
Saxenian (1990), p. 97. The company cofounder quoted here was Robert Walker of LSI Corporation.
 
32
Teece (2014).
 
33
Saxenian (1990), p. 97.
 
35
Saxenian (1990).
 
Literatur
Zurück zum Zitat Bahrami, H. (1992). The emerging flexible organization: Perspectives from Silicon Valley. California Management Review, 34(4), 33–52. CrossRef Bahrami, H. (1992). The emerging flexible organization: Perspectives from Silicon Valley. California Management Review, 34(4), 33–52. CrossRef
Zurück zum Zitat Bahrami, H., & Evans, S. (2005). Super-flexibility for knowledge enterprises. Berlin: Springer. Bahrami, H., & Evans, S. (2005). Super-flexibility for knowledge enterprises. Berlin: Springer.
Zurück zum Zitat Florida, R. (2002). The rise of the creative class. New York: Basic Books. Florida, R. (2002). The rise of the creative class. New York: Basic Books.
Zurück zum Zitat Freeman, C., Clark, J., & Soete, L. (1982). Unemployment and technical innovation. London: Frances Pinter. Freeman, C., Clark, J., & Soete, L. (1982). Unemployment and technical innovation. London: Frances Pinter.
Zurück zum Zitat Kenney, M. (Ed.). (2000). Understanding Silicon Valley. Stanford: Stanford University Press. Kenney, M. (Ed.). (2000). Understanding Silicon Valley. Stanford: Stanford University Press.
Zurück zum Zitat Matthews, G. (2002). Silicon Valley, women, and the California dream: Gender, class, and opportunity in the twentieth century. Stanford: Stanford University Press. Matthews, G. (2002). Silicon Valley, women, and the California dream: Gender, class, and opportunity in the twentieth century. Stanford: Stanford University Press.
Zurück zum Zitat Norberg, A. L. (1976). The origins of the electronics industry on the Pacific coast. Proceedings of the IEEE, 64(9), 1314–1322. Norberg, A. L. (1976). The origins of the electronics industry on the Pacific coast. Proceedings of the IEEE, 64(9), 1314–1322.
Zurück zum Zitat Rogers, E. M. & Larsen, J. K. (1984). Silicon Valley fever: Growth of high-technology culture. New York: Basic Books. Rogers, E. M. & Larsen, J. K. (1984). Silicon Valley fever: Growth of high-technology culture. New York: Basic Books.
Zurück zum Zitat Saxenian, A. (1990). Regional networks and the resurgence of Silicon Valley. California Management Review, 33(1), 89–112. CrossRef Saxenian, A. (1990). Regional networks and the resurgence of Silicon Valley. California Management Review, 33(1), 89–112. CrossRef
Zurück zum Zitat Saxenian, A. (1994). Regional advantage: Culture and competition in Silicon Valley and route 128. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Saxenian, A. (1994). Regional advantage: Culture and competition in Silicon Valley and route 128. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
Zurück zum Zitat Shurkin, J. N. (2006). Broken genius: The rise and fall of William Shockley, creator of the electronic age. Basingstoke/New York: Macmillan. Shurkin, J. N. (2006). Broken genius: The rise and fall of William Shockley, creator of the electronic age. Basingstoke/New York: Macmillan.
Zurück zum Zitat Starr, K. (1973). Americans and the California dream 1850–1915. New York: Oxford University Press. Starr, K. (1973). Americans and the California dream 1850–1915. New York: Oxford University Press.
Zurück zum Zitat Steiber, A., & Alänge, S. (2013). The formation and growth of Google Inc.: A firm-level triple helix perspective. Social Science Information, 52(4), 575–604. CrossRef Steiber, A., & Alänge, S. (2013). The formation and growth of Google Inc.: A firm-level triple helix perspective. Social Science Information, 52(4), 575–604. CrossRef
Zurück zum Zitat Teece, D. (2014). Regional clusters, ecosystems and dynamic capabilities: Lessons from Silicon Valley, presentation from Berkeley Research Group to the iKuben conference in San Francisco, 1 Dec. 2014. Teece, D. (2014). Regional clusters, ecosystems and dynamic capabilities: Lessons from Silicon Valley, presentation from Berkeley Research Group to the iKuben conference in San Francisco, 1 Dec. 2014.
Zurück zum Zitat Tutorow, N. E. (2004). The Governor: The life and legacy of Leland Stanford. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark Company. Tutorow, N. E. (2004). The Governor: The life and legacy of Leland Stanford. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark Company.
Metadaten
Titel
Silicon Valley: A Cradle of Management Innovation
verfasst von
Annika Steiber
Sverker Alänge
Copyright-Jahr
2016
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-24921-6_3

Premium Partner