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Über dieses Buch

This book, the first volume, highlights 8 out of a total of about 36 megacities in the World which by definition have 10 million inhabitants. The cities/chapters presented in this book are based on recent advance such as the wide use of ICT, IOT, e-Governance, e-Democracy, smart economy and flattening and acceleration of the world that is taking place in recent times as reported by 3 times Pulitzer Prize Winner Thomas Friedman. It therefor departs from other ideologies where only a certain megacity qualifies for the title of smart global megacities while in reality every megacity can, and presents how smart global megacities can be created.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Introduction

Frontmatter

The Configuration of Smart and Global Mega Cities

Abstract
There are about 31 megacities of population size 10 million and above in the universe in 2016 as per UN-Habitat which is likely to be 41 in 2030. These gigantic habitats are significant as it has all the potential to convert into smart and global cities if configured for its sustainability. This creative configuration of megacities to smart and global is the outcomes of the book through city case studies. The vast population, cultural and ecosystem diversity, diverse institutional endowments, supply chains connectivity, global linkages and size of income and expenditure in these megacities creates opportunities for configuring to a smart global city. This chapter tries to understand the title of the book and surveys the growth, development, and distribution across geographic regions. Theories of global cities are studied briefly and finally ends up with broad approaches to configure these megacities to smart and global. In conclusion, the smart global economic community design strategy is detailed out and implemented in Kochi-Kannur megacity study. This chapter serves as a background of several case studies of megacity across many continents in this book.
T. M. Vinod Kumar

E-Commerce and the City: Vignettes from Kozhikode, India

Abstract
E-commerce has been making rapid inroads into Indian markets. Historically, markets have been central to the configuration of the city. When e-commerce is changing these markets, we need to assess what digital market platforms will mean for the future of the city’s markets and the traditional brick and mortar sellers. The current research focuses on hyperlocal e-commerce initiatives emerging as alternatives to dominant e-commerce players. Using the city context of Kozhikode, the chapter explores how hyperlocal e-commerce responses are being led by young entrepreneurs from the traditional business communities of the city and how their growth is catalyzed by the Kozhikode’s ethos of solidarity and mutual support. We would like to make use of qualitative research methods adopting a case-study approach with in-depth interviews with different stakeholders in conjunction with timeline methods to unveil this transformation. We focus on four hyperlocal e-commerce initiatives in the city. We find that there is still room for smaller ‘hyperlocal’ players from the city in the emerging digital markets and they would play a pivotal role in the ‘smartening’ of the city bottom-up. In cities where commerce thrived for centuries owing to centuries old trust and informal social control, ‘hyperlocal’ e-commerce platforms are here to stay.
Althaf Shajahan, Fawaz Kareem

Territorial Intelligence Project: Governance for Megalopolis Urban-Rural Linkage Pattern: Comparative Study Between Po River Valley Megalopolis Region, Italy & Chennai and Kolkata, India

Abstract
Megalopolis or Mega-city is a new scale that should not be defined by population numbers. We are in a new dimension, a new DNA. In the context of Megalopolis and regions where the scale of the urbanization goes beyond the traditional definition of a Metropolis, defining an effective governance structure and strategies is a challenging yet fundamental goal. Information technology plays a vital role in building the global Megalopolis, as the virtual infrastructure and data allow a city to be strategic at the international scale while advancing inhabitants’ daily life at the local scale. In this chapter we attempt to define the governance strategies in the mega global cities in two steps: first, to trace the dynamics between the various stakeholders in the mega-project that is often complex and less hierarchical and provide a framework where the genome of a Metropolis is evident. The second step emphasizes the importance of the direct relationship between the governance structure and the territorial contexts and intelligences.
Antonella Contin, Pedro B. Ortiz, Valentina Galiulo, Raana Saffari Siahkali, Alessandra Pandolfi, Paola Campi, Sravya Lutukurthi, Ravali Sathiwada, Kushal Kumar, Piyush Girgaonkar

Tokyo

Frontmatter

Tokyo Smart Global Megacity—Smart Sustainable Energy Solutions

Abstract
Tokyo, is a uniquely placed to be the one of the only smart global mega cities in Asia, leads the path of technology for numerous aspects especially energy and the relevant infrastructural technology, nuclear power energy sector among others. Standing tall among veteran landmarks of London, Paris, New york and the later additions of Sydney, Shanghai etc. being the global mega city since 90’s and continuing now for almost to over three decades with speaks loudly of its inherent strength to be consistent and sustainable merits as well. Pioneering with best of information technology the nation has paved the path for nuclear energy; a need arising, as the country lacks with natural resources. For a global mega city to operate large quantity of energy is of required; from sources to network distribution to consumption, energy efficiency and its related impact of carbon emissions to zero carbon as the need of the hour with climate change on the horizon. The city has been steady for number one ranking among the global mega cities now for over three decades just speaks volumes for the consistency of nature of growth and governance at large. The thrust of the paper is to demonstrate, with case example of Tokyo, how the mega city positions energy as the sector the crucial nexus to the one for climate change, by firmly arranging it into its policy framework and for the future as well; also it looks into how Tokyo has made energy efficiency solutions are smart and sustainable. The take away of the chapter also overreaching into how may be from the organizational structure governance arrangement can optimise use of technological and social smart grids and consumption solutions patterns at large.
Sharma Krishan Anjali, Suwa Aki, Inagaki Kenji

Mumbai

Frontmatter

Smart Mega Global City: A Roadmap of Mobility as a Service for Mumbai

Abstract
Mumbai has attained the attribute of being the global economic hub and financial epicenter of India. Mumbai has emerged as the largest Urban Agglomeration (UA) in India and has 18.4 million in 2011. By 2030, Mumbai will be the fourth largest in the world, as per UN-Habitat statistics. The research focused on Greater Mumbai’s economic stature in the context of national and regional economic development, followed by identifying the main actors for its growth story, reviewing the establishment of Mumbai as an economic hub, and finally envisioning it as a smart global megacity. Further, Mumbai already has multiple modes of transports readily available. It already has established the travel behavior of a user dependent on multiple modes of transports as well as governed by the user’s spending capacity and willingness to spend. The research also focused on a detailed framework of implementing Mobility as a Service (MaaS) for Mumbai by integrating the technology and the innovation with the help of Information and Communications Technology (ICT). Necessary policy recommendations are also suggested for the long-term economic health and sustainable mobility of Mumbai.
Amit Chatterjee, Premjeet Dasgupta, Gaurav Vaidya

Assessment of Mumbai to Serve as a Smart Global Mega City

Abstract
This chapter performs the SWOT analysis for Mumbai to evaluate its preparedness to serve as a smart global mega city. It suggests how its strengths could be leveraged to rise to the opportunities while its weaknesses and threats need to be overcome. The available opportunities could be utilized to help the megacity emerge as the key player not only in the country’s but also the global economy by redefining its role as a financial and tourism hub, while reviving its industry in the key sectors. It goes on to discuss how the Mumbai Port Trust plans to redevelop the lands with it on the eastern front accordingly. Further, the infrastructure in various service verticals needs to be augmented to serve its populace better by deploying ICT and IoT. Its agglomeration with other metrocities in the Mumbai Metropolitan Region, supported by a second sea port and airport in Navi Mumbai, is positioned to emerge as a global economic hub.
Priya Mendiratta, K. V. R. K. Ravi Kumar

New York

Frontmatter

An Overview of Climate Protection and Resiliency Planning in the New York Megacity Region

Abstract
The megacity of New York has increasingly emphasized on sustainability, resiliency and climate protection goals in its urban policies and planning initiatives since the turn of the 21st century. Hurricane Sandy in 2012 became a major tipping point in the city’s initiatives for proactive climate adaptation and mitigation planning. New York has not only continued its global economic dominance by fostering innovation, entrepreneurship, cultural diversity, and inclusion; but also has pledged to protect its residents, built up areas and critical infrastructure from rising sea levels, coastal flooding, and storm surges by investing billions of dollars in the coming decades. The strategic plans, PlaNYC and OneNYC embrace New York’s unique assets and aim to promote an inclusive governance to achieve its sustainability goals. The strong political and community will to build a resilient city is demonstrated through its ambitious commitment of reducing carbon emissions with technological, social and behavioral changes, advancing climate risk assessment technologies, integrating climate protection measures in every aspect of local and regional planning, and adopting technologically advanced as well as natural adaptation measures to protect the region from climate risks. This chapter presents an overview of New York metro region’s multifaceted urban policies and planning initiatives since the 2000s that extensively engage public agencies at local, regional and state levels with multiple stakeholders, and local communities to achieve urban resiliency. While this megacity has indeed demonstrated many success stories; the extent to which it can address equity, affordability and inclusiveness issues will determine the success of the city in the decades to come.
Sudeshna Ghosh, Sweta Byahut, Calvin Masilela

Hongkong-Shenzhen

Frontmatter

Towards a Smart Megacity: Hong Kong and Shenzhen

Abstract
The Pearl River Delta in Guangdong province of China contains some of the fastest growing cities in the world. Enjoying locational advantage as a gateway to China, the cities in the region favor the biggest investments, trade and growth. Having long been a transshipment port in its colonial period, Hong Kong grew rapidly between the 1960s and 1990s with development of industry and manufacturing, and established itself as an international financial hub. Just across the border, Shenzhen experienced exponential growth since its designation as a Special Economic Zone (SEZ) in 1980 as a result of China’s economic reform and “open door” policy starting in 1978, attracting Hong Kong and foreign investments that enabled the development of its manufacturing sector and more recently its tech sector. Instead of competing with each other, as neighboring cities Hong Kong and Shenzhen can be viewed together as a megacity within the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area (GBA). With their complementing population, skills and economy, the integration towards a megacity with smart thinking would bring greater synergies and benefits to the two cities. This section assesses the two cities with the Smart and Sustainable City Framework and examines how Hong Kong and Shenzhen viewed together as a smart megacity would benefit both cities and is better for the people as well and could also help drive the smart and sustainable development of the GBA. Following the assessment and analysis, suggestions as to how the two cities can collaborate further on various aspects including physical, socio-economic, environmental, community and administrative integration are also addressed briefly. As the “one country, two systems” of Hong Kong as a Special Administrative Region (SAR) of China is set to expire in 2047, the integration will not only result in more collaboration between the two cities, but a much smoother transition after 2047.
Sujata S. Govada, Hei Lau, Suhasini Kotala

Kolkata

Frontmatter

Smart Global Megacities Spatial Strategies for Kolkata Metropolitan Region

Abstract
Metropolitan cities are the drivers of the economy. Some of these metropolitan cities have merged into mega cities. As these are centers of attraction it is pertinent to govern these centers so as to harness their full potential. There is no clear guideline or precedence of governing the mega cities in the country. Through this research attempt has been made to understand the structure, governance systems and the issues of the mega cities. The largest city centers that have been existing and experimented in governance are the metropolitan cities and regions. Metropolitan governance in India is polycentric and fragmented system with limited coordination. This research discusses the governance systems of the metropolitan cities and their issues as well to create a comparison with those of the mega city. It has been put forth that the existing governance system is suboptimal and requires a research and discussions as a way forward for the newly emerging mega cities. Some suggestions have been made to improve the governance of these mega cities.
Prabh Bedi, Mahavir

Conclusion

Frontmatter

International Collaborative Research: “Smart Global Mega Cities” and Conclusions of Cities Case Studies Tokyo, New York, Mumbai, Hong Kong-Shenzhen, and Kolkata

Abstract
This chapter has two parts. In the first part, objectives, and the organizational details of the international collaborative research project “Smart Global Megacities” are discussed. In the second part are presented in consultation with the team leaders of the city study, their general conclusions of the study Smart Global Megacities.
T. M. Vinod Kumar
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