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Über dieses Buch

C. Amting Directorate General Information Society, European Commission, Brussels Under the 4th Framework of European Research, the European Systems and Soft­ ware Initiative (ESSI) was part of the ESPRIT Programme. This initiative funded more than 470 projects in the area' of software and system process improvements. The majority of these projects were process improvement experiments carrying out and taking up new development processes, methods and technology within the software development process of a company. In addition, nodes (centres of exper­ tise), European networks (organisations managing local activities), training and dissemination actions complemented the process improvement experiments. ESSI aimed at improving the software development capabilities of European enterprises. It focused on best practice and helped European companies to develop world class skills and associated technologies to build the increasingly complex and varied systems needed to compete in the marketplace. The dissemination activities were designed to build a forum, at European level, to exchange information and knowledge gained within process improvement ex­ periments. Their major objective was to spread the message and the results of experiments to a wider audience, through a variety of different channels. The European Experience Exchange ~UR~X) project has been one of these dis­ semination activities within the European Systems and Software Initiative.~UR~X has collected the results of practitioner reports from numerous workshops in Europe and presents, in this series of books, the results of Best Practice achieve­ ments in European Companies over the last few years.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Spi, Essi, Eurex

Frontmatter

1. Software Process Improvement A European View

Abstract
Enterprises in all developed sectors of the economy — not just the IT sector — are increasingly dependent on quality software-based IT systems. Such systems support management, production, and service functions in diverse organisations. Furthermore, the products and services now offered by the non-IT sectors, e.g., the automotive industry or the consumer electronics industry, increasingly contain a component of sophisticated software. For example, televisions require in excess of half a Megabyte of software code to provide the wide variety of functions we have come to expect from a domestic appliance. Similarly, the planning and execution of a cutting pattern in the garment industry is accomplished under software control, as are many safety-critical functions in the control of, e.g., aeroplanes, elevators, trains, and electricity generating plants. Today, approximately 70% of all software developed in Europe is developed in the non-IT sectors of the economy. This makes software a technological topic of considerable significance. As the information age develops, software will become even more pervasive and transparent. Consequently, the ability to produce software efficiently, effectively, and with consistently high quality will become increasingly important for all industries across Europe if they are to maintain and enhance their competitiveness.
Michael Haug, Eric W. Olsen, Lars Bergman

2. The EUREX Project

Abstract
The European Experience Exchange project (EUREX) was conceived, proposed, and carried out as an ESSI Dissemination Action (see Chapter 1). The overall objective of EUREX was to evaluate the experiences of several hundred ESSI Process Improvement Experiments (PIEs) and to make this experience accessible to a broad European audience in a convenient form. In particular, the goal was to collect and make available to interested practitioners information about Software Best Practice and its introduction in specific problem domains.
M. Haug, E. W. Olsen

3. The EUREX Taxonomy

Abstract
One of the most significant tasks performed during the EUREX project was the creation of the taxonomy needed to drive the Regional Workshops and, ultimately, the content of these Software Best Practice Reports. In this chapter, we examine in detail the process that led to the EUREX taxonomy and discuss how the taxonomy led to the selection of PIEs for the specific subject domain.
M. Haug, E.W. Olsen

Metrics, Measurement and Process Modelling

Frontmatter

4. Perspectives

Abstract
Three perspectives on Software Process Improvement through Metrics are given in this chapter. The views of Norman Fenton and José D. Carrillo Verdun were presented at EUREX Metrics Workshops in the UK and Spain respectively. Terttu Orci was an active member of the Nordic EUREX team and made a study of Metrics Quality in relevant Process Improvement Experiments.
Lars Bergman, Norman Fenton, José D. Carrillo Verdún, Terttu Orci

5. Resources for Practitioners

Abstract
The following is a consolidation of the many resources used by the various PIE teams studied.
Lars Bergman

6. Experience Reports

Abstract
Seven PIEs were selected for presentation in this chapter. They were chosen for the range of interesting and important aspects of Metrics for Improvements in Software Organisations.
Lars Bergman, Helmut Woda, Erik Rodenbach, Frank van Latum, Rini van Solingen, Stefano Cinti, Giandomenico Oldano, Elena Orazi, Christiane Gresse, Barbara Hoisl, Dieter Rombach, Gunther Ruhe, Markku Oivo, Alfonso Fuggetta, Luigi Lavazza, Sandro Morasca, R. Barbati, T. R. Judge, A. Williams, G. Sabbatici, Alenia Rome, P. Panarono, S. Farina, Helge M. Roald, Jens-Otto Larsen, Anthony Powell, Duncan Brown, Gerd Eickelpasch

7. Lessons from the EUREX Workshops

Abstract
Workshops were used by the EUREX project as a principal means for collection and processing of PIE experiences. The workshops were organised by regions in order to facilitate PIE participation both from a travelling point of view and from a language point of view. The partners arranged the workshops in order to develop the common themes in accordance with the EUREX taxonomy. SISU, the Nordic EUREX partner arranged four workshops on Configuration and Change Management, Metrics and Lifecycle, Object Orientation, Components and Reuse, Requirements and Testing, all in Stockholm. The participating PIEs were Norwegian, Finnish and Danish as well as Swedish. An additional metrics workshop was organised and conducted in the UK.
Lars Bergman

8. Significant Results: Benefits, Costs, and Processes

Abstract
In this chapter, we examine several issues that were raised in virtually all of the measurement PIEs: business and technological benefits, measurement related costs, and measurement processes. In each case, we give several examples from the PIEs themselves to illustrate the issues.
Lars Bergman

Process Improvement Experiments

Frontmatter

9. Table of PIEs

Abstract
Table 9.1 below lists each of the PIEs considered as part of the EUREX taxonomy within the problem domain of Metrics and Process Modelling.
Michael Haug, Eric W. Olsen, Lars Bergman

10. Summaries of PIE Reports

Abstract
By setting up the automated framework for code reviewing and selection Denkart will not only have build a mechanism useful for every development process, but we will also gain understanding in metrics (automatically and manually collected) and their relation towards software quality. Furthermore it will raise the quality issue to the level of developers and management which is important regarding the culture change needed to build a quality conscious company.
Michael Haug, Eric W. Olsen, Lars Bergman

Backmatter

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