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Über dieses Buch

This book gives a comprehensive overview on Software Product Management (SPM) for beginners as well as best practices, methodology and in-depth discussions for experienced product managers. This includes product strategy, product planning, participation in strategic management activities and orchestration of the functional units of the company. The book is based on the results of the International Software Product Management Association (ISPMA) which is led by a group of SPM experts from industry and research with the goal to foster software product management excellence across industries. This book can be used as textbook for ISPMA-based education and as guide for anybody interested in SPM as one of the most exciting and challenging disciplines in the business of software.

Hans-Bernd Kittlaus is the Chairman of ISPMA and owner and managing director of InnoTivum Consulting, Germany. Samuel Fricker is Board Member of ISPMA and Professor at FHNW, Switzerland.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

1. Introduction

Abstract
Why do we write another book on software product management (SPM)? And what is so special about product management for software compared to other products?
Hans-Bernd Kittlaus, Samuel A. Fricker

2. Management of Software as a Business

Abstract
Product management has become an established discipline in many industries since Procter and Gamble introduced it in 1931. During the last decades, most software product companies—such as Microsoft, IBM, and Google—have implemented Software Product Management (SPM). So did a few corporate information technology organizations in essentially all industries, as well as some companies that produce software embedded in software-intensive products and services. The role of software product manager has emerged during this time as being of strategic value since it is crucial to the economic success of a product.
Hans-Bernd Kittlaus, Samuel A. Fricker

3. Product Strategy

Abstract
The pace of technological change in the past several decades has been faster in the IT industry, specifically in the software sector, than in any other industry. This development makes it necessary for the organizations concerned, both software vendors and corporate IT organizations, regularly to make far-reaching decisions under uncertainty that have considerable financial and even survival consequences. Yet, in spite of the fast pace of change, companies with a clear strategic view are the ones that prove to be successful in the long term. In recent years, SAP, Apple, or PTC have been excellent examples. This does not mean that at these companies all product ideas are succesful or that every product strategy produces the desired results. It does also not mean that strategy definition is strictly top-down without experimentation. However, it does mean that these companies routinely manage to reach agreement on and consistency in their corporate vision, corporate strategy, product strategies (or product platform and family strategies) and more short-term implementation plans by means of iterative processes that sometimes require a great deal of time and effort. So the companies realize faster what works, and what does not work, can avoid waste, and move on in a more focused and more aligned way.
Hans-Bernd Kittlaus, Samuel A. Fricker

4. Product Planning

Abstract
Product planning is a core activity of a software product manager as described in the Software Product Management Framework. In this book, we differentiate the following processes:
  • Roadmapping: the strategic and long-range planning of how a software product shall evolve.
  • Product Requirements Engineering: the collection, analysis, and documentation of the software product’s requirements.
  • Release Planning: the definition of the detailed contents and schedule of a forthcoming product release.
Hans-Bernd Kittlaus, Samuel A. Fricker

5. Strategic Management

Abstract
Strategic Management is an activity within an organization with the objective to define, plan, agree, implement and evaluate the organization’s strategy. It is part of the responsibility of executive management who can delegate preparatory work to staff functions. Strategic Management includes a number of elements related to software product management (see the ISPMA SPM Framework in Sect. 2.5). Software product managers are typically not responsible for any of these activities, but they either participate in them, e.g. portfolio management, provide inputs, or make use of their outputs, e.g. product analysis.
Hans-Bernd Kittlaus, Samuel A. Fricker

6. Orchestration of the Organization’s Functional Areas

Abstract
It is part of the concept of an “enterprise” that people with different abilities, experiences, and skills work together as employees to reach common goals. Typically this cooperation is governed by a division of work so that the individual strengths of each employee can be optimally utilized. The task of management lies in the definition and communication of the goals—strategic to operational—to create organizational structures that lead and support the cooperation, to check the progress towards the goals frequently and to intervene whenever necessary. In this sense, software product management is a comprehensive management task to its full extent focused on one or several software products.
Hans-Bernd Kittlaus, Samuel A. Fricker

7. SPM Today and Tomorrow

Abstract
Companies are usually founded to participate in the economy as organizations that exist in the long term. In spite of all modernistic focus on the short term, it must be a key objective of any executive management to make the company’s success sustainable. Based on this concept of sustainability, this book emphasizes the importance of state-of-the-art software product management for the success of companies that have software(-intensive) products in their portfolio.
Hans-Bernd Kittlaus, Samuel A. Fricker

Backmatter

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