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Über dieses Buch

This book is a celebration and explication of the body in the world and the ways that our body situates our consciousness as a lived formation, one which is oriented by the experience of music listening. The book examines the relationship between bodies, technics, and music, using the theoretical tools of somatechnics. Somatechnics calls for a recognition of the body in the world as an artefact wrapped up, entangled and produced by the materialities of that world. It traverses discussions on materiality, live music, touchscreen media, the personal computer, and new modes of listening such as virtual reality technologies. Finally, the book looks at music itself as a kind of technology that generates new modes of bodily being.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction: Listening Through the Body

Abstract
The introductory chapter elucidates the nature and direction of this book and lays out the primary assertion: That technics situate and produce the body in the world, and the book focuses on this process in relation to music listening in popular music culture. In order to explore this argument, the introductory chapter outlines the ways in which we can deploy the language and theoretical tools of somatechnics in understanding the relationships between bodies, technologies, and music listening, that is, as a way that the body is wrapped up and ultimately entangled with those technologies. At its core however, somatechnics seeks to expose the invisible nature of the way technicities produce and are produced by the bodymind, thus, the integration of popular music studies with somatechnics presupposes a political aspect to this project.
Laura Glitsos

Chapter 2. Materiality, the Bodymind, and Music Listening

Abstract
This chapter explores the ways in which sensory perception comes to render music as both knowable and pleasurable through the interplay of bodymind with materiality—that is, through the complementary interactions with surface, weight, touch, feel, smell, size, and so forth. The author argues that the changing notions around corporeality, knowability, perception, and materialism come to reshape our relationships to the physical objects of music, and this then shapes listening pleasure more broadly. Following Bartmanski and Woodward (The Vinyl: The Analogue Medium in the Age of Digital Reproduction. Journal of Consumer Culture 15 (1): 3–27, 2015), the author emphasizes that the role of touch and materiality maintains a critical, yet redefined, position in music listening culture despite the emergence of digital music as the dominant listening mode. This approach is then synthesized with a theoretical framework of sensorial somatechnics.
Laura Glitsos

Chapter 3. Liveness in the Age of Digitization

Abstract
This chapter elucidates the various ways in which we might imagine new distinctions (or lack thereof) between liveness and mediatization in the post-millennium digital context by applying theoretical perspectives of somatechnics to certain live music listening practices. The chapter argues that there are certain technics which bring forth and produce listening pleasure, functioning with and within the somatic. Namely, there is a focus on: The technics of time and its significance in the production of liveness and authenticity; the somatechnics of dance as it functions to embody music listening; and the somatechnics of vocality as it functions in the live music space as a vibratory technology. Finally, through the use of Derrida’s work on ‘teletechnology,’ the author examines the emergence of camera phone technology in reshaping, recrafting and reimagining new understandings of liveness, presence and actuality in the realm of live concerts and how those new understandings might be wrought with the language of the body and somatechnics.
Laura Glitsos

Chapter 4. Screen as Skin: The Somatechnics of Touchscreen Music Media

Abstract
This chapter explores the way mobile music devices with touchscreen technology produce new somatechnical figurations that reshape emotional dynamics of music listening. Touchscreens imply the relationship between skin on skin—the skin of our body (in particular the hands) against the skin of the screen. It follows that mobile touchscreen devices suggest a degree of sensuality—in the coming together of bodies, fluids and other organic materials which ‘stick’ to the touchscreen, the language of ‘stickiness’ pointing to Sara Ahmed’s conceptualization of the way affect can “stick” to bodies. The function of skin, both in a corporeal and a discursive sense, cannot be. Skin is not politically benign. By “thinking through the skin,” to use the Sara Ahmed and Jackie Stacey’s words, the author reads mobile touchscreen technology as an exciting new way to imagine music listening in terms of cyborgian relations.
Laura Glitsos

Chapter 5. The ‘Creative Listener:’ Internet, Music, and the Computer-Bodymind Somatechnic

Abstract
This chapter focuses on the Internet as a technology of music listening as it is accessed exclusively through fixed-point personal computers. The author is concerned with how the listener actively and creatively produces their own listening experience as it is mediated through the fixed-point personal computer. It is asserted that the coupling of the bodymind and the personal computer produces a unified field of relations, an artefact which we can examine through the lens of somatechnics. This unified field of relations, what is referred to as the ‘personal computer bodymind,’ or for short the PCBM, realigns and reconstitutes listening pleasure in unexpected ways because it enables unique and creative listening practices contingent upon the functional nature of Internet-computing technologies and they are expressed in the interactive Web 2.0 culture. The chapter argues that the PCBM produces a new ‘type’ of listener: the creative listener.
Laura Glitsos

Chapter 6. Future Bodies, Future Music

Abstract
This chapter reflects on several practices of music listening which have emerged in the past decade and which integrate virtual or mixed realities such as TheWaveVR and 3D mapping at live shows. By doing so, the chapter focuses on where music listening is located and, moreover, where it may continue to venture towards. The author proposes that popular music culture is seeing an emerging trend toward virtual and mixed reality technologies in music listening which play upon notions of ‘the real’ and a general concern with ‘immersion’. Most importantly, this work expounds on what this concern might tell us about the bodymind in the music listening experience and how this is experience continues to be produced by techné. The chapter offers that next-generation virtual reality and ‘mixed reality’ technologies reconstitute the somatechnic capacities of bodymind dynamics in listening practices in a way that foregrounds the site of the body as the ‘ground zero’ of all experiential exchange.
Laura Glitsos

Chapter 7. Conclusion: Music as Somatechné

Abstract
This chapter concludes the arguments put forth in this book by way of exploring a final assertion: That the musical text as it interfaces with the body is the ultimate technicity of listening. At the root of all the techniques and technologies through which music is mediated, it is the primary aspects of music which provide us an ultimate technical gift. From the organization of sounds to the tempo of beats, to the granularity of vocality and the all the details in between—it is music which we might call an ultimate exteriorization in the pursuit of pleasure. The body brings music into being, but simultaneously, this chapter looks at the way in which music brings the body into being.
Laura Glitsos

Backmatter

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