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Strategy, Structure and Performance in a Transition Economy

An Institutional Perspective on Configurations in Russia

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st Since the beginning of the 21 century, three key business trends have been identified with a pronounced influence on future microeconomic and macroeconomic developments across the globe: Firstly, with the advent of the network economy, int- organizational relations and structures are increasingly becoming the object of analysis. Successful companies have extended the concept of an appropriate organizational structure beyond internal relationships to those spanning across the entire business network by taking the country specific institutional context into consideration. Secondly, with slowing growth in the developed markets and abundant growth opportunities in the developing economies, companies are turning to these markets for new business expansion. Finally, during the last number of years, so called ‘emerging giants’, which are strong local players from developing economies, have started to globalize and to expand into the developed markets. Among other reasons, these firms have edged themselves into the limelight by maintaining the right fit between their strategy type and inter-organizational structures in their home markets.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter
1. Introduction
Abstract
Since the beginning of the 21st century, three key business trends have been identified as having a pronounced influence on future microeconomic and macroeconomic developments across the globe (e.g. Prahalad and Lieberthal, 2003, p. 110; Ayios, 2004, p. 21–34; Napier and Thomas, 2004, p. 34; Khanna and Palepu, 2006): Firstly, with the advent of the network economy, inter-organizational relations and structures are increasingly becoming the object of analysis (e.g. Gulati et al., 2000; Ford et al., 2003; Pfeffer and Salancik, 2003). The type and level of inter-organizational structures are potential causes of failure in network organizations, and are thus crucial for a firm’s and its network members’ success. Successful companies have extended the concept of an appropriate organizational structure beyond internal relationships to those spanning across the entire business network by taking the country specific institutional context into consideration (e.g. Schary and Skjott-Larsen, 2003, p 73–106; Cox et al., 2004; Peng and Zhou, 2005). Secondly, with slowing growth in the developed markets and abundant growth opportunities in the developing economies, companies are turning to these markets for new business expansion. Future markets will not only exist in the major developed countries, but also in developing economies like Russia. Finally, during the last number of years, so called ‘emerging giants’, which are strong local players from developing economies (Khanna and Palepu, 2006), have started to globalize and to expand into the developed markets. Among other reasons, these firms have edged themselves into the limelight by maintaining the right ‘fit’ between their strategy type and inter-organizational structures in their home markets.
2. Basics on Strategy, Structure and Environment
Abstract
In the classical Chandlerian view (Chandler, 1962, p. 14), strategy determines structure. However, nowadays strategy and structure are clearly seen as two sides of the same coin (e.g. Hall and Saias, 1980; e.g. Chandler, 1992a; Whittington et al., 1999). Existing (inter-organizational) structures determine the capacity of the organization to pursue specific strategies, and may also entrench managerial interests that shape a firm’s specific strategy type. As a result, strategy and structure are gradually matched through ongoing mutual adaptation. Furthermore, strategy and structure are influenced by the external environment. In the case of transition economies research shows that the institutional context, in particular, is highly crucial (e.g. Hoskisson et al., 2000; Peng 2000; 2003; Hitt et al., 2004; Child and Tsai, 2005).
3. Russia as a Major Transition Economy
Abstract
Chapter 3 discusses Russia as this dissertations’ particular focus of study for a transition economy. More in-depth, Chapter 3.1 informs the reader about general characteristics and the specific transition phases of economies in transition. Based on this, in Chapter 3.2, Russia’s transition to a market economy, including the transition of business networks within the country, is explicitly explained. Chapter 3.3 gives an overview of Russia’s current institutional context by focusing on six dimensions. Finally, Chapter 3.4 provides a summary.
4. Theoretical Framework and Hypotheses
Abstract
In Chapter 4 the theoretical framework of this thesis is derived. The framework should facilitate the analysis of the interdependencie s between a firm’s strategy type and interorganizational structures in relation to company performance, as well as the influence of the institutional context in Russia. Referring to the introductory Chapter 1.2, the main research questions are:
(1)
Which strategy-structure configurations promise the highest success probability?
 
(2)
How should firms strategically position themselves in the Russian market? How do they best connect themselves to their business network partners?
 
(3)
What influence does the perceived institutional context have on these configurations in Russia? Which dimensions of the perceived institutional context are most influential and critical?
a.
What is the influence of the perceived institutional context on strategy type in Russia?
 
b.
What is the influence of the perce ived institutional context on interorganizational structures in Russia?
 
 
5. Empirical data
Abstract
This chapter introduces the empirical data used in this dissertation. First, the data gathering process is described in Chapter 5.1. Following this, an overview of the sample is provided in Chapter 5.2. Then, a descriptive analysis of the status quo and trends of Russia’s business environment is performed in Chapter 5.3. Here, possible insights on the future development of Russia are provided with particular focus on its business environment. Finally, the operationalization of the constructs is discussed in Chapter 5.4.
6. Empirical analysis of the theoretical model
Abstract
The hypotheses derived in Chapter 4 will be tested based on the operationalized constructs. The data collected is statistically analyzed using the following two software packages: SPSS 15.0 and SmartPLS 2.0. These two different statistics programs are used since each has certain strengths and weaknesses, and both have some unique features which are not incorporated in the other. Consequently, the simpler descriptive analysis is primarily done with SPSS using regression analysis, t-tests (i.e., independent-samples t-test and paired-samples t-test), and calculations of mean values. The exploratory analysis is conducted with SmartPLS by using a partial-least square model.
7. Conclusion
Abstract
This chapter contains a summary of the dissertation. Based on the main findings, final comments and recommendations are presented in Chapter 7.1. Finally, future research areas are identified in Chapter 7.2.
Backmatter
Metadaten
Titel
Strategy, Structure and Performance in a Transition Economy
verfasst von
Tobias Weigl
Copyright-Jahr
2008
Verlag
Gabler
Electronic ISBN
978-3-8350-5562-9
Print ISBN
978-3-8350-0874-8
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-8350-5562-9

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