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Über dieses Buch

This book provides a general introduction to the topic of buildings for resistance to the effects of abnormal loadings. The structural design requirements for nuclear facilities are very unique. In no other structural system are extreme loads such as tornadoes, missile and loud interaction, earthquake effects typical in excess of any recorded historical data at a site, and postulated system accident at very low probability range explicitly, considered in design. It covers the whole spectrum of extreme load which has to be considered in the structural design of nuclear facilities and reactor buildings, the safety criteria, the structural design, the analysis of containment. Test case studies are given in a comprehensive treatment. Each major section contains a full explanation which allows the book to be used by students and practicing engineers, particularly those facing formidable task of having to design complicated building structures with unusual boundary conditions.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Nuclear Power Plant Facilities and Regulatory Guides

Abstract
A number of nuclear power stations exist worldwide. This chapter concentrates on British, American, Canadian and European research and commercial reactors and nuclear power stations. The directory exists on the past, present and future planning for the NPS and are continuously being updated. In this chapter carefully selected nuclear stations with various design parameters have been clearly dealt with.
M.Y.H. Bangash

Chapter 2. Loads and Material Properties for Nuclear Facilities – A General Survey

Abstract
The probable failure assessment of structures for nuclear power facilities has bearings on the choice and postulation of the loads and load combinations, since the exact magnitude of the loads encountered in nuclear power plant design cannot be easily predicted. The loads are normally treated as random variables. These loads are generally defined in terms of probability of strength in different components/elements of structures for a nuclear facility.
M.Y.H. Bangash

Chapter 3. Dynamic Finite Element Analysis

Abstract
A great deal of work has been published on finite element techniques.
This chapter presents the linear and non-linear dynamic finite element analysis intended to be used for nuclear facilities. Plasticity and cracking models are included. Solid isoparametric elements, panel and line elements are included which represent various materials. Solution procedures are recommended. Programs ISOPAR, F-BANG and other computer packages are recommend for the dynamic non-linear analysis of structures for nuclear facilities with and without cracking.
M.Y.H. Bangash

Chapter 4. Steel Pressure Vessels for Nuclear Facilities

Abstract
Steel pressure vessels have been used to contain reactor designed for various nuclear power facilities in the world. The dimensions, loadings and materials used are dependent on the type of reactor systems adopted in the nuclear facilities. Some are core left standing covered by radiation shielding or embedded in thick concrete walls and slabs. A typical reactor pressure vessel for PWR is shown in Plate 4.1 Table 4.1 indicates design limit stresses for various pressure parts. This chapter begins with the general design criteria for pressure vessels. These vessels are first treated as thin shell surfaces. The equations of equilibrium of the element shell of revolution have been established. Equations are derived for cylindrical shell surfaces of the vessel.
M.Y.H. Bangash

Chapter 5. Concrete Reactor Pressure Vessels

Abstract
This chapter attempts to review the state of the art of methods of analysis and design of the concrete reactor pressure vessels and their components. Existing vessels have been examined for elastic, inelastic and cracking conditions.
M.Y.H. Bangash

Chapter 6. A Complete Manual Design Analysis of Concrete Containment Vessel (Building) Using American Practices and Codes

Abstract
A comprehensive analysis is related to these structures has been given in this text: Design loads, material properties and other design specifications and parameters have been thoroughly explained. In this chapter, preliminary design calculation for the containment based on limits state concept are given using U.S Regulations and codes. One typical case of BELLEFONTENUCLEAR PLANT of the TVA is considered. Design calculations for other kinds of PWR shall be carried out on the same line using new design parameters and guidelines. For detailed analysis a reference is made to the following comprehensive paper by author.
M.Y.H. Bangash

Chapter 7. Concrete Containment Subject to Aircraft Crashes and Seismic Effects and Over Pressurisation

Abstract
A comprehensive analysis of the containment using numerical techniques has been given in this text. More examples are given in the author’s following book: ‘Shock, Impact and Explosion’, Springer This time Size well B containment vessel (Fig. 7.1) is taken as an example. Figures 7.2, 7.3, 7.4 and 7.5 show typical reinforcement system. Figure 7.6 shows a secondary dome provided to protect the primary containment from the external hazards and public from the internal hazards. The same containment is taken as an example to assess its behaviours in the seismic environments and an over pressurisation.
M.Y.H. Bangash

Chapter 8. Bonded Reinforcement in the Concrete Reactor Pressure and Containment Vessels

Abstract
The quantity and disposition of main bonded reinforcement in the Hunterston— ‘B’ P C P V is taken as a typical case study. In this chapter covering only main and local bonded reinforcement are covered. An attempt has been made to discover the need and function of main bonded steel in the prestressed concrete cylindrical pressure vessel. The same is adhered to the containment vessel. At present there is no established method available to determine the amount of such steel needed in the vessel and to adjudge its performance during working and overload conditions of the vessel.
M.Y.H. Bangash

Chapter 9. Concrete Nuclear Shelters

Abstract
There is increasing current concern about safety from nuclear hazards, including nuclear blasts and radiation. There will be greater involvement in protecting people against such hazards. A nuclear shelter is just one of many ideas to protect and shield a person from the effects of nuclear explosions. These structures can range from a deep buried rigid structure to a concrete framed box covered with soil.
M.Y.H. Bangash

Chapter 10. Elemental Design Analysis for Auxillary Structures Associated with Nuclear Facilities

Abstract
In this chapter design calculations are given for auxiliary structures associated with nuclear facilities. They are divided into three parts. Part A deals with the design analysis of steel elements using steel Euorcode EC-3. Part B deals with the design analysis of concrete elements based on Eurocode EC-2. Parts C is developed entirely based on the design of a nuclear laboratory. It is assumed that the dimensions and thicknesses of various elements are in accordance with the nuclear requirements and have satisfied the radioactive and the radiation parameters normally adopted by the respective experts. Any necessary changes and alterations needed must be adhered to the demands imposed by those experts. Part C can only claim on the structural design analysis of the structural elements of the nuclear laboratory, using British Codes such as BS 8110, BS 5950 and other codes.
M.Y.H. Bangash

Backmatter

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