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Survivable Optical WDM Networks investigates different approaches for designing and operating an optical network with the objectives that (1) more connections can be carried by a given network, leading to more revenue, and (2) connections can recover faster in case of failures, leading to better services. Different networks – wavelength-routed WDM networks, wavelength-routed WDM networks with sub-wavelength granularity grooming, and data over next-generation SONET/SDH over WDM networks – are covered. Different approaches are proposed to explore every aspect of a protection scheme such as:

(1) Protection granularity: a. At wavelength granularity. b. At sub-wavelength granularity

(2) Protection entity: a. Path protection. b. Sub-path protection. c. Segment protection.

(3) Routing: a. Single-path routing. b. Multi-path routing.

Tradeoffs between different objectives, e.g., resource efficiency vs. recovery time, are explored and practical approaches are proposed and analyzed.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

With the explosive growth of the data network, optical-fiber technology employing wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) [Mukherjee, 1997, Ramaswami and Sivarajan, 1998, Stern and Bala, 1999] has been researched as well as commercially deployed as the technology that can satisfy our increasing bandwidth requirements because of its potentially limitless capabilities, e.g., huge bandwidth and low signal attenuation [Mukherjee, 2000].
Canhui Sam Ou, Biswanath Mukherjee

Chapter 2. Shared-Path Protection for Resource Efficiency

We consider the problem of dynamic survivable lightpath provisioning against single-fiber failures. Specifically, we focus on shared-path protection because of its desirable resource efficiency resulting from backup sharing. Protection approaches to optimizing resource utilization for a given traffic matrix [Crochat et al., 2000, Modiano and Narula-Tam, 2002, Ramamurthy et al., 2003, Van Caenegem et al., 1998] do not apply because lightpath requests come and go in the dynamic provisioning case. Under such a scenario, a network management system needs to compute two link-disjoint paths—a dedicated working path and a shared backup path—for an incoming lightpath request based on the current network state. We concentrate on computing link-disjoint paths for each incoming lightpath request with the assumptions that existing lightpaths cannot be disturbed and no knowledge of future arrivals is available at the time of provisioning this lightpath request. While we consider full wavelength-convertible networks here, the extension to the wavelength-continuous case is straightforward.
Canhui Sam Ou, Biswanath Mukherjee

Chapter 3. Sub-Path Protection for Scalability and Fast Recovery

As networks migrate from stacked rings to meshes because of the poor scalability of interconnected rings and the excessive resource redundancy used in ring-based protection [MacDonald et al., 2000], mesh-structured protection schemes have been receiving increasing attention [Doshi et al., 1999, Ramamurthy et al., 2003, Iraschko et al., 1998, Van Caenegem et al., 1998, Crochat et al., 2000, Miyao and Saito, 1998, Mohan et al., 2001]. We review the work on WDM mesh protection for a given set of lightpath requests (which is the focus of this chapter), and classify them based on whether they treat the underlying mesh as a whole, or they fragment the mesh into other protection domains [Gerstel and Ramaswami, 2000a], or they split an end-to-end lightpath into different segments.
Canhui Sam Ou, Biswanath Mukherjee

Chapter 4. Segment Protection for Bandwidth Efficiency and Differentiated Quality of Protection

We consider the problem of dynamic survivable lightpath provisioning against single node (crossconnect) and single link (fiber) failures. Specifically, we focus on shared protection (because of its desirable resource efficiency) with the assumptions that existing lightpaths cannot be disturbed and no knowledge of future arrivals is available at the time of provisioning the current lightpath request. While we consider full wavelength-convertible networks here, the extension to the wavelength-continuous case is straightforward.
Canhui Sam Ou, Biswanath Mukherjee

Chapter 5. Survivable Traffic Grooming-Dedicated Protection

While the transmission rate of a wavelength channel is high (typically STS-192 today and STS-768 expected to be deployed), the bandwidth requirement of a typical connection request can vary from the full wavelength capacity down to STS-1 or lower. To efficiently utilize network resources, sub-wavelength-granularity connections can be groomed onto direct optical transmission channels, or lightpaths1. Meanwhile, the failure of a network element can cause the failure of several lightpaths, thereby leading to large data and revenue loss. Fault-management schemes such as protection are essential to survive such failures.
Canhui Sam Ou, Biswanath Mukherjee

Chapter 6. Survivable Traffic Grooming-Shared Protection

The previous chapter explored survivable traffic grooming with dedicated protection. This chapter investigates survivable traffic grooming with shared protection.
Canhui Sam Ou, Biswanath Mukherjee

Chapter 7. Survivable Virtual Concatenation for Data Over Sonet/Sdh

SONET/SDH has historically been the dominant transport infrastructure optimized for reliable delivery of voice and private-line services in metro and backbone networks. They likely will remain in the foreseeable future as the dominant framing layer for supporting integrated data and voice services over optical transport networks to leverage the existing SONET/SDH infrastructure because of the emerging data-over-SONET/SDH (DoS) technologies: namely generic framing procedure [Hernandez-Valencia et al., 2002], virtual concatenation [ANSI T1X1.5, 2001-062, 2001, ITU, G.707, 2002], and link-capacity-adjustment scheme [ITU-T Rec. G.7042/Y.1305, 2001].
Canhui Sam Ou, Biswanath Mukherjee

Backmatter

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