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Über dieses Buch

This translation brings a landmark systems engineering (SE) book to English-speaking audiences for the first time since its original publication in 1972. For decades the SE concept championed by this book has helped engineers solve a wide variety of issues by emphasizing a top-down approach. Moving from the general to the specific, this SE concept has situated itself as uniquely appealing to both highly trained experts and anybody managing a complex project. Until now, this SE concept has only been available to German speakers. By shedding the overtly technical approach adopted by many other SE methods, this book can be used as a problem-solving guide in a great variety of disciplines, engineering and otherwise.
By segmenting the book into separate parts that build upon each other, the SE concept’s accessibility is reinforced. The basic principles of SE, problem solving, and systems design are helpfully introduced in the first three parts. Once the fundamentals are presented, specific case studies are covered in the fourth part to display potential applications. Then part five offers further suggestions on how to effectively practice SE principles; for example, it not only points out frequent stumbling blocks, but also the specific points at which they may appear. In the final part, a wealth of different methods and tools, such as optimization techniques, are given to help maximize the potential use of this SE concept.
Engineers and engineering students from all disciplines will find this book extremely helpful in solving complex problems. Because of its practicable lessons in problem-solving, any professional facing a complex project will also find much to learn from this volume.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

17. Correction to: Systems Engineering

Reinhard Haberfellner, Olivier de Weck, Ernst Fricke, Siegfried Vössner

SE-Principles

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Systems Thinking

Abstract
Systems thinking and the systems engineering process model are important principles of systems engineering (Fig. 1.1).
Reinhard Haberfellner, Olivier de Weck, Ernst Fricke, Siegfried Vössner

Chapter 2. Process Models: Systems Engineering and Others

Abstract
The systems engineering process model described below contains a series of recommended actions and guidelines that have proven their worth in practice and constitute an essential component of the systems engineering methodology. Its integration into the systems engineering concept can be seen in Fig. 2.1.
Reinhard Haberfellner, Olivier de Weck, Ernst Fricke, Siegfried Vössner

The Problem-Solving Process

Frontmatter

Chapter 3. Systems Design

Abstract
In systems design (Fig. 3.1), we differentiate between:
Reinhard Haberfellner, Olivier de Weck, Ernst Fricke, Siegfried Vössner

Chapter 4. Project Management

Abstract
The place of project management within the framework of the systems engineering concept can be seen in Fig. 4.1. Project management is part of the problem-solving process, which we divide into two parts:
Reinhard Haberfellner, Olivier de Weck, Ernst Fricke, Siegfried Vössner

Systems Design as Systems Architecting and Concept Development

Frontmatter

Chapter 5. Systems Architecting

Abstract
As in our earlier treatment, we divide systems design into systems architecting and concept development (Fig. 5.1).
Reinhard Haberfellner, Olivier de Weck, Ernst Fricke, Siegfried Vössner

Chapter 6. Concept Development

Abstract
Concept design involves developing a selected architectural design in a more concrete and detailed fashion. This may make it necessary to make architectural decisions at the subsystems or system element level. Example: overall vehicle architecture, drive train architecture, safety systems architecture, etc.
Reinhard Haberfellner, Olivier de Weck, Ernst Fricke, Siegfried Vössner

Case Studies

Frontmatter

Chapter 7. The Systems Engineering Basics in Our Systems Engineering Concept

Abstract
In the following pages, the application and interpretation of the methodology are presented using three case studies. The first case study, “Home Construction,” is simple and is presented in all phases. The second, “Airport,” is substantially more complex. We only examine the preliminary study phase. The third, more recent case deals with a very interesting urban planning (overriding design of city areas with different owners) and within it a very attractive Science Tower (in terms of function and technology in addition to its architecture).
Reinhard Haberfellner, Olivier de Weck, Ernst Fricke, Siegfried Vössner

Chapter 8. Case Study 1: Private House Building: Additional Domicile

Abstract
The following case study is based on a project that one of the authors carried out using the principles presented here – not strictly and formally, but hopefully recognizable in the logic.
Reinhard Haberfellner, Olivier de Weck, Ernst Fricke, Siegfried Vössner

Chapter 9. Case Study 2: Airport Planning

Abstract
The following example illustrates a more complex case: design of an entire airport.
Reinhard Haberfellner, Olivier de Weck, Ernst Fricke, Siegfried Vössner

Chapter 10. Case Study 3: Smart City and Science Tower, Graz

Abstract
In this case study, we describe a very interesting urban development project (Smart City Graz) which includes an attractive construction project, in terms of aesthetics and in terms of technology (Science Tower).
Reinhard Haberfellner, Olivier de Weck, Ernst Fricke, Siegfried Vössner

SE for Practice

Frontmatter

Chapter 11. Seven Basic Recommendations

Abstract
Our systems engineering model consists of the components indicated in Fig. 11.1.
Reinhard Haberfellner, Olivier de Weck, Ernst Fricke, Siegfried Vössner

Chapter 12. Typical Weak Areas in Projects (Stumbling Blocks)

Abstract
Difficulties, weaknesses, and deficiencies in projects in accordance with various key subjects are listed in Table 12.1. It reflects the experiences of the authors and their project partners in countless client projects. It can be comforting to learn that nobody is left alone with these and similar difficulties, but is in good company, even with well-respected firms.
Reinhard Haberfellner, Olivier de Weck, Ernst Fricke, Siegfried Vössner

Chapter 13. Activities Checklists

Abstract
The conceptual approaches described in Parts I through IV are summarized and linked to one another below as checklists in an incremental process. For each of the six checklists, the particular project phase (Fig. 13.1), purpose, object (of the abstract research or the concrete work), and results are described.
Reinhard Haberfellner, Olivier de Weck, Ernst Fricke, Siegfried Vössner

Chapter 14. Characteristics of Successful Project Management

Abstract
In his comprehensive, empirical analysis, W. Keplinger formulated the characteristics of a successful project. His results are summarized below:
Reinhard Haberfellner, Olivier de Weck, Ernst Fricke, Siegfried Vössner

Methods and Tools (M&T)

Chapter 15. Survey of Methods and Tools

Abstract
Below we show, in an encyclopedic format, common methods and tools (M&Ts) that, on the one hand, support the work of systems design (architectural design and conceptual design) and, on the other, the work of project management.
Reinhard Haberfellner, Olivier de Weck, Ernst Fricke, Siegfried Vössner

Chapter 16. Encyclopedia/Glossary

Abstract
An → arrow in the text refers to a corresponding key word in the encyclopedia.
Reinhard Haberfellner, Olivier de Weck, Ernst Fricke, Siegfried Vössner

Backmatter

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