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Über dieses Buch

TEX is the program for printing high quality mathematical text to which all others are compared. It is flexible enough to be used on many different computer architectures and operating systems ranging from microcomputers to mainframes. In a relatively short period of time it has become the standard tool for mathematical typesetting at practically all major universities. The versality of TEX has allowed it to be used in a wide variety of applications; for example, it is used for publishing scholarly journals which adhere to the highest typesetting standards, and also to publish student papers and theses. This book is designed for the complete newcomer to TEX. It starts by showing how to typeset simple text that mostly uses the defaults predefined by TEX. By use of graded exercises, the situations covered slowly become more complex and include many different types of mathematical constructions and tables. In the end it is possible to handle almost any standard mathematical situation. The different tables presented in this book allow it to be used as a quick reference. The similar features of TEX are gathered together whenever possible to give an overview that is a good foundation forbecoming more proficient and for doing more creative typesetting. This book can be used either as a tool to learn just enough TEX to write standardmathematical papers of modest complexity or as a building block to prepare for more ambitious typesetting projects.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

1. Getting started

Abstract
To begin with we shall assume that TEX has been set up on your computer and you now want to start using it. In this section we will look at the exact steps that are necessary. We’ll look at some samples to see how things work, and we’ll look a little bit at the philosophy behind using TEX.
Michael Doob

2. All characters great and small

Abstract
There are lots of characters and symbols available to the TEX user. It’s really exciting to have the chance to use these different styles of type, so much so that it is surely tempting to overdo things a bit at first. In this section we see how to use the different fonts available in an easy and efficient manner.
Michael Doob

3. The shape of things to come

Abstract
In this section we want to see how to make text have different shapes or sizes. We may use TEX with the default sizes, of course, just as we have been doing so far. We’ll now become more creative with our output. As we go along, we’ll be able to make more subtle changes when desired. In discussing the size of various parts of a page of text, there are several units of measure we can use.
Michael Doob

4. {Groups, {Groups, {and More Groups}}}

Abstract
The concept of gathering text into groups allows TEX input files to be greatly simplified. A new group is started by the character {and terminated by the character}. Changes made within a group will lose their effect when the group terminates. So, for example if {\bf three boldface words} appears in your text, the opening brace starts the group, the \bf control word changes to a boldface font, and the closing brace finishes up the group. Upon completion of the group the font being used is the one in effect before the group started. This is the (easier) way of having a few words in a different font. It’s also possible to have groups nested within groups.
Michael Doob

5. No math anxiety here!

Abstract
TEX is at its best when typesetting mathematics. The conventions for doing this are many and complex, and the ability of TEX to take them into account makes the production of high quality, attractive mathematical output possible. If you plan to produce papers with mathematical symbols in them, this section will give you all the basics necessary for creating beautiful output in almost all circumstances; TEX may be used without any mathematics, of course, and if this is your goal, then the following two subsections are probably sufficient for your needs.
Michael Doob

6. All in a row

Abstract
It’s not uncommon to want to put a table in the middle of some text. Fortunately TEX makes it easy to do this. In fact there are two separate methods of aligning text. The first is by using the tabbing environment. This is similar to setting the tab stops on a typewriter. Each line is handled individually, according to set tab columns, but with greater flexibility than that provided by a typewriter. The second is the horizontal alignment environment which typesets the whole table at once using a prescribed pattern.
Michael Doob

7. Rolling your own

Abstract
In this section we’ll create new control words. The making of these new definitions, also called macros, is one of the most powerful techniques available in TEX. For the first application of this facility, we’ll see how a new definition can save a lot of typing by substituting short strings for long ones.
Michael Doob

8. To err is human

Abstract
In some ways TEX is not completely divine. TEX will respond to invalid input by giving an error message to the screen if you are using it interactively and will also send that message to the log file. Because TEX is very complicated, the actual point where the error is detected may be deep within the program, so a full report of the error may be rather long and involved. Not only that, TEX will try to recover from errors, and will report what was done in that process. For this reason, the reading of error messages may be a little difficult and somewhat intimidating for the uninitiated. The key is to know what is important from your perspective and what can be safely ignored. So let’s look at some typical errors and the messages that they generate.
Michael Doob

9. Digging a little deeper

Abstract
In this section we look at a few topics that allow TEX to be used with greater flexibility or efficiency. As the documents being produced get longer, different techniques can help make their creation easier.
Michael Doob

10. I get by with a little help

Without Abstract
Michael Doob

Backmatter

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