Skip to main content
main-content

Über dieses Buch

This book explores how culture and tradition have impacted the tendency for African women to opt for entrepreneurship. The first section presents literature on the concept of entrepreneurship and introduces traditional African women entrepreneurs—the first-generation, culture-driven entrepreneurs, driven by the need to alleviate poverty within the family. The second section covers the modern, second-generation entrepreneurs driven by such forces as education, globalization, and technology. Further, the author assesses the regional perspectives on entrepreneurship and explores the entrepreneurial ecosystems to determine their relevance to the development of entrepreneurial spirit in Africa and among women in particular. This book expands on knowledge about the role that women play in the socio-economic development of the African continent.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Introduction and First-generation Micro Entrepreneurs

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Global Perspectives on Entrepreneurs and Entrepreneurship

Abstract
The title of this book indicates its focus but does not provide the purpose and approach used in examining this phenomenon in the continent of Africa. The book proposes to examine the ecological factors that drive or motivate women in Africa to opt for entrepreneurship.
Chi Anyansi-Archibong

Chapter 2. Africa: Entrepreneurs and Entrepreneurship in the Continent

Abstract
The continent of Africa is fast evolving economically, socially, technologically, and globally. As the continent moves toward an entrepreneurial-based economy, earlier perspectives and opinions are slowly but surely changing.
Chi Anyansi-Archibong

Chapter 3. Culture and Traditional Foundations of African Women Entrepreneurs

Abstract
The traditional marriage ceremonies and celebrations have just ended and guests are leaving the bride’s family premises. Nneka, the bride, is with her close friends and family members taking stock of the wedding gifts from both her parents and other immediate community mothers. It is usually the norm or custom in most African countries, following the discussions, agreement, and payment of dowry from the bridegroom and his family, for the bride’s family to spend some of the dowry on gifts for their daughter, the bride.
Chi Anyansi-Archibong

Chapter 4. Regional Perspectives of Women Entrepreneurs: Similarities, Differences, and Contributing Forces

Abstract
Cultures and traditions which defined the African woman’s status and gendered roles on the surface indicate more similarities than differences among women status across the regions. The tendencies for the first-generation women entrepreneurs and their multiple roles have more in common regarding the type of industries or businesses they operate. The potential impact of the culture-induced social structures in the five key regions of the continent and the implications for women entrepreneurial activities are explored in relations to the generally identified traditional characteristics of the African woman including limited access to education, marginalized, early marriage, family caregiver, denied property inheritance, and in most cases become vegetable farmers, small retail traders, with domestic skills.
Chi Anyansi-Archibong

Chapter 5. Challenges, Opportunities, and Interventions for Women Entrepreneurs

Abstract
Dr./Mrs. or Chief/Mrs. Nike Okundaye or yet “Mama Nike” is used by most of the people who have come to know her and her work. One will think that with all the above titles that Mama Nike is one of the privileged African educated women, unfortunately, this is not the case.
Chi Anyansi-Archibong

21st Century Second-generation Entrepreneurs and Entrepreneurial Development

Frontmatter

Chapter 6. Characteristics of Second-Generation African Women Entrepreneurs: Education, Technology, and Globalization Effect

Abstract
Research reports, publications, and magazines describe and attest to the resilience, courage, motivation, and other characteristics of the current generation African female entrepreneurs. And as much as the challenges of the first-generation and culture-induced entrepreneurs still linger into this present era, there have been notable improvements in female education, training, access to finance, mentorship and networking.
Chi Anyansi-Archibong

Chapter 7. Africa: Prospects for Entrepreneurial Development

Abstract
Aliko Dangote, Africa’s richest man and industrialist cautioned African leaders about its constant blame on lack of financial capital as a major hindrance for its development.
Chi Anyansi-Archibong

Chapter 8. An Inclusive and Diverse Entrepreneurial Ecosystem for Africa

Abstract
The African Union (AU) and its allies have been holding series of discussions on the need and potentials of achieving a single African market, Africa Continental Free Trade Agreement (ACFTA).
Chi Anyansi-Archibong

Chapter 9. Africa’s Diaspora: Prospects for Women Entrepreneurs

Abstract
It is interesting to note that as much as Africa is not fully developed (economically and socially) nor free of the ever-present political conflicts, its citizens in the diaspora are always thinking of her, especially the women.
Chi Anyansi-Archibong

Chapter 10. Future of Women Entrepreneurs in Africa

Abstract
Chisolum was not sure what the future will be when she lost her husband at the age of 35. They had four children with the oldest barely celebrating her seventh birthday and the youngest barely five months old. Her future and that of her young children at that moment of unforgettable tragedy were bleak and almost non-existent. Her husband died unexpectedly from a fire outbreak at the petroleum company’s rig where he worked as an engineer.
Chi Anyansi-Archibong

Chapter 11. Conclusions and Trends

Abstract
It is apparent that the rhythm of the drum beat for African women is changing very fast for several reasons and in various ways. Just as the Kossi proverb (African Missionaries Calendar, 2004) indicates, “if the rhythm of the drum changes, the dance steps must adapt.” The roles and status of the African woman are changing and they are adapting quickly and steadfastly to the new roles.
Chi Anyansi-Archibong

Chapter 12. Profiles of Select African Women Entrepreneurs: Their Stories, Successes, Inspirations, and Challenges

Abstract
This chapter presents the profiles of select women entrepreneurs. The selection is random and designed to showcase African women’s engagement in different sectors of the economy as well as their respective personal attributes. The selection is not based on financial success and financial net-worth but on the diverse entrepreneurial attributes and the characteristics they represent.
Chi Anyansi-Archibong

Backmatter

Weitere Informationen

Premium Partner

    Bildnachweise